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335th. ANNUAL REPORT of the TOWN OFFICERS 



The water color on the cover depicts Fork Factory Hill, 
an area soon to be developed on Route 109 at the Dover 
line. The scene is typical of old stone walls throughout 
the Town. Painting by Ron Lister, town employee and 
author of Painting with Pastels . His paintings have been 
displayed throughout New England as well as in the Medfield 
Public Library during 1985. 



335th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1985 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1985medf 



The 1985 Annual Town Report 
is dedicated to 



THE VISITING NURSES 



who served the Townspeople as 
early as 1916. Over the years, 
they have provided various and 
sundry health care, continued 
to provide skilled nursing care 
and a word of cheer to the sick 
who were housebound, conducted 
flu clinics and blood pressure 
clinics, and in earlier years 
were the school nurses. 

Among the dedicated Visiting 
Nurses, past and present, we 
honor are Ruby Erwin, Madeleine 
Harding, Honey Whitney and 
Marilyn Whelan. 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1985 
Assessed Valuation 1985 
Tax Rate 



Area 

Miles of Highway 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet 

Medfield is in the following Voting Districts 

10th District 

Representative to Congress 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 







10,330 






$480,357,350 


1/1/85 - 


6/30/85 


21.50 


7/1/85 - 


12/31/85 


14.60 

14.43 Square Miles 

68 . 09 


180 feet 


above mean 


seal level. 



Barney Frank 

114 Floral Street 

Newton, MA 02158 



Robert F. X. Casey 
11 Pacella Drive 
Dedham, MA 02026 



Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex District 
State Senator 



8th Middlesex District 



David H. Locke 
15 Ordway Road 
Wellesley Hills, MA 02181 

Andrew S. Natsios 
234 Courtland Street 
Holliston, MA 01746 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United States Senators 



Edward M. Kennedy 
J.F.K. Memorial Building 
Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Boston, MA 02203 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1985: 



Democrats 1309 
Republicans 1409 
Independents 3365 



TOTAL 



6083 



IN MEMORIAM 



Thomas F. Clancy 

Registrar 1953 - 1964 
Special Police Officer 1953 - 1957 



Charles Laverty 
School Teacher 1956 - 1985 

Amy F. Fiske 

Library Aide 1984 - 1985 

Laura Huntington Smith 

School Teacher 1956 - 1958 

Library Trustee 1960 - 1975 

Charter Commissioner 1971 - 1974 

Historical Commission 1973 - 1984 

Town Historian 1981 - 1985 



Ralph C. Copeland 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



Term Expires 
1986 



Nancy J. Preston 
Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 
Nancy J. Preston 



Ann B. Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 
William F. Nourse 



Susan N. Thornton 
Melville J. Mills 
William Walsh 



Gay W. D'Amaro 
William A. Hajjar 
Robert A. Kinsman 
F. Paul Quatramoni 
Barbara J. Tupper 



TREASURER 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SELECTMEN 



ASSESSORS 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Michael Howard 

Patricia S. Kallio 

Elizabeth L. Martin, Resigned 

Susan A. Parker 

Richard Fitzpatrick* 

Gretchen B. Childs 

Marilyn A. Connors 



PLANNING BOARD 



Daniel W. Nye 
Joseph Parker 
Sarsfield Brennan 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
John Gagliani 



1988 



1987 



1986 



1986 
1987 
1988 



1986 
1987 
1988 



1986 
1986 
1987 
1987 
1988 



1986 
1986 
1987 
1987 
1986 
1988 
1988 



1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 



*Elected to fill vacancy until election 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



Term Expires 



Mary V. Gillis* 
William J. Heller 
Robert W. Miller 
Paul Allen, Resigned 
Sandra Fitch 
Christopher Lennon 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Jane N. Kelly, State appointed 

Mark C. O'Connor 

Peter A. Gaines 

Richard M. Denton 

William D. Walsh, Resigned 

Diane Nightingale 



FIRE CHIEF 



Joseph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann 

SERGEANTS 



1986 
1986 
1986 
1987 
1987 
1987 



September 10, 1986 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 



Patrick W. Clancy 



Ronald E. Kerr 
POLICE OFFICERS 



George W. Kingsbury 



Anthony A. Bertone 
Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Stephen P. Grover 



Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr , 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT PATROLMEN 



Dana Friend 
Ruth E. Gaffey 
Shawn Garvey 
Richard Kelcourse 
John Mayer 



James Nagle 
Michael Riggs 
Doreen Ryan 
John W. Wilhelmi 



^Elected to fill vacancy until election 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
SELECTMEN 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR Term Expires 

Michael J. Sullivan 1986 

SUPERINTENDENT - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kenneth P. Feeney 1986 

TOW ACCOUNTANT 

Michael J. Sullivan 1986 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles Fuller, Jr. 1986 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Carol Ann Nye 1986 

Edward J. Toomey 1987 

Neil MacKenzie 1988 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Michael J. Rogers 1986 

H. Tracy Mitchell 1987 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 1988 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Leland D. Beverage, Associate Member 1986 

John A. Rose, Jr. 1986 

Harry C. Merrow 1987 

John D. Williams 1988 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Malcolm Gibson 1986 

TREE WARDEN 

Malcolm Gibson 1986 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 

John P. O'Toole 1986 



DOG OFFICER Term Expires 

Louise Papadoyiannis 1986 

Jennifer A. Shaw 1986 

Stephen M. Shaw 1986 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Karen MacGregor 1986 

Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M. , Assistant 1986 

POUND KEEPER 

Roy Owen 1986 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 1986 

Anthony Calo, Local Inspector of Buildings 1986 

Walter R. Nye, Gas Inspector 1986 

John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 1986 

Michael Wright, Acting Assistant Gas Inspector 1986 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 1986 

Walter R. Nye, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 1986 

Michael Wright, Acting Plumbing Inspector 1986 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 1986 

Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 1986 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

Joseph L. Marcionette 1986 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

John T. Ganley 1986 

Mary MairEtienne 1987 

Roberta Kolsti 1988 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 1986 

G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 1986 

COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 



Nancy J. Preston 1986 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Patricia A. Rioux 1986 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Patricia A. Rioux 1986 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 

Patricia A. Rioux 1986 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

Austin C. Buchanan & Assistant, Edward M. Hinkley 1986 

9 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP Term Expires 

Anthony A. Bertone Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 

Richard D. Bishop William H. Mann 

Robert W. Brady John Mayer 

Patrick J. Caulfield Michael Mushnick 

Patrick W. Clancy James Nagle 

Robert Currie Robert E. Naughton 

Dana Friend Carol Ann Palmieri 

Ruth A. Gaffey Michael Riggs 

John T. Garvey Patricia A. Rioux 

Shawn Garvey Kevin W. Robinson 

Lawrence Goldman Robert D. Roy 

Stephen H. Grover Doreen Ryan 

Ronald E. Kerr Raymond J. Wheeler 

George W. Kingsbury John W. Wilhelmi 

Eileen O'Brien Robert G - v - Taylor 
SCHOOL TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS AND POLICE MATRONS 



Gretchen B. Childs 




April 


1986 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 




April 


1986 


Priscilla Mahoney 




April 


1986 


Elisabeth T. Mann 




April 


1986 


Susan A. Medina 




April 


1986 


Mary T. Nyren 


POLICE MATRONS 


April 


1986 


Gretchen B. Childs 




April 


1986 


Jessie A. Erskine 




April 


1986 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 




April 


1986 


Priscilla Mahoney 




April 


1986 


Mary I. MairEtienne 




April 


1986 


Elisabeth T. Mann 




April 


1986 


Susan A. Medina 




April 


1986 


Mary Nyren 




April 


1986 


Carol Ann Palmieri 




April 


1986 


Patricia A. Rioux 




April 


1986 


Mary Solari 




April 


1986 


SPECIAL POLICE 


OFFICERS - BEN FRANKLIN SECURITY 







Ronald A. Taddeo 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICER - ROCKY WOODS 

Stephen E. Bassett 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS - MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 

Charles Coffone Robert McGrath 

James Gibson Greg Plesh 

Joseph Harkins, III Leo J. Prince 

Valerie Jones John Rogers 

Will ram J. Marchand, Jr. 



10 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Leo Acera 
Albert Baima 
Walter J. Barnes 
Bruce A. Berry 
Edward Blais 
Lawrence Brackett 
Leo N. Brennan 
Albert Brown 
James Brown 
Herbert Burr 
James Campbell 
William Carlson 
Joseph Carvalho 
Vincent Cellucci 
Clinton M. Clark 
Joseph Concannon 
Robert E. Currie 
Robert Dixon 
Kenneth W. Dunbar 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Shawn P . Garvey 
John Holmes 
William D. Jones 
Samuel Johnston 
George Katapodis 
Edward Kerwin, Jr. 
Edward Kerwin, Sr. 



Robert J. Larkin 
Alfred Leverone 
James Love joy 
Roderick MacLeod 
William Meau 
George P. Michel 
Hugh Mick 

Frank S. Newell, Jr. 
William F. Nourse 
Christopher Paige, Jr. 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Gene Piken 
William R. Reagan 
Walter F. Reynolds, Sr, 
David Riggs 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Warren Robinson 
Joel Rosenfeld 
John Ryan 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Carl Sheridan 
Kenneth E. Silva 
John F. Sullivan 
Herbert Talerman 
Ann B. Thompson 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Triefol 
John E. Varnum 
Thomas Ward 
John Wenger 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Fredrick C. Temple 

Ben Korbly 

Hilda Needle 

Mary Downing 

Arthur L. Farrar 

Constance Scribner, Resigned 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member 

Susan Mastronardi, Associate Member 

Nancy Munroe, Associate Member 

Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 



Term Expires 



April 


1986 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Robert F. Sylvia 

Burgess P. Standley 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. 

Harry A. Kelleher, Associate Member 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 



April 1986 

April 1987 

April 

April 

April 

April 



1988 
1986 
1986 
1986 



11 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 



Pauline A. Coulter 
Robert Coulter 

rly Hallowell 
.es H. Rayner, 
Christie A. Shoop 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Bruno J. Palumbo 



Jr 



Term Expires 

April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 



MEDFIELD REPRESENTATIVE - BAY CIRCUIT GREENBELT 



Jesse Matuson 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Stephen W. Cook 
Gay D'Amaro 
Francis A. Iafolla 
Stephanie J. Loer 
Susan A. Parker 
William F. Pope 
Patricia Quintina 
Rosalie Shirley 



April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



R. Edward Beard 
Herbert P. Boyle 
Richard Foley 



Robert H. Gibbs 

James W. Jackson 

Daniel O'Halloran, Associate Member 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 



Jane B. Archer 
Oliver R. Brooks 
James W. Jackson 
Thomas M. Reis 
Robert K. Sawyer. 



Jr. 



April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1986 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Francis J. Cusack 
Robert Savage 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 
Nancy Temple 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 



Fred W. Clarridge, Jr. 
Lorraine G. Holland 
Doris E. Keller, Resigned 
Thelma Meader 



Daniel W. Nye 
David L. Owen 
Roy C. Watson 



CHARLES RIVER WATERSHED PROJECT - MANAGEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Harry A. Kelleher 



April 1986 



L2 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Deputy Director 

Richard Ostrander, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Stephen Wood, Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

George Wood, Radio Operator 

Gene L. Piken, Radio Operator 

Ruth A. Gaffey, Shelter Manager 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 



Term Expires 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 



CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 



Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Captain 

Bruce Berry, Sergeant 

Albert Brown, Sergeant 

Herbert Talerman, Range Sergeant 

Raymond Burton, Jr. 

Robert Currie 

Ruth A. Gaffey 

Jonathan Gifford 

Lawrence Goldman 

Thomas Hamano 

Judith C. Harris 

Patrick S. Harris 

James T. Kashalena 

John Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

James P . Nagle 

Tara Ann Nagle 

Christopher S. Paige, Jr. 

Gene L. Piken 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Robert J. Sessa 

Armando R. Viera, Jr. 

Leonard Vitale 

Stephen Wood 

Doreen A. Ryan 

George Wood 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 
Martin McLaughlin 
Paul G. Murphy 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 



Sarsfield Brennan 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



DRAINAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 



William H. Mann 



April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


Robert Kenned} 


r 


Robert Kinsman 



13 



M IV GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 



John Carmichael 

. Ellsworth 
rie Bl] sworth 
ret P. Mollis 
ond 0. Hollis 

L . Owen 
Ven 
Harold Pritoni 



II 



April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



John Bradstreet, Resigned 

Lee Howell 

John F. Guthrie 

Robert A. Kinsman 

Douglas Campbell 

Betty A. Kaerwer 

Bernard Monbouquette 

David Morrish 

Stephen Bassett, Associate Member 

John H. Beale, Associate Member 

Richard W. Bryant, Associate Member 

Edmund P. Hammond, Associate Member 

Hanson C. Robbins, Associate Member 

Jesse Matuson, Associate Member 



April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Paul E. Hinkley 
Ann B. Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 
William F. Nourse 



April 1986 
April 1986 
April 1987 
April 



1988 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Robert Currie 
William H. Mann 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Dr. James D. Sullivan 
Michael J. Sullivan 



April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 

April 1986 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 



John P. 0' Toole 
Anthony Calo, Assistant 



April 1986 
April 1986 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 



Robert H. Janoch, Jr. 

STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 458 MAIN STREET 



April 1986 



Jane Archer 
Walter M. Frank 



John Gagliani 
Thelma Spicer 



Roy C. Watson 
14 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



Edith A. 


Beale 






Robert H 


. Janoch. 


, Jr. 




David H. 


Martin, 


Resig 


ned 


Donald Senger 






Jesse L. 


Matuson 






David Bivolcic 







HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Laura H. Smith, Deceased 

Donna Terzian 

Eleanor M. Anes 

Robert J. Mannino 

Ann S. Mentzer 

Nancy L. Codispoti 

Donald J. MacDonald 

David L . Owen 

Robert A. Dellaselva, Associate Member 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Stephen Buckley, Jr. 
Robert J. McCarthy 
John Gagliani, Resigned 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Charles H. Peck 
Anne Lee Howell 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Charles W. Jenks , Jr 
Harry A. Kelleher 
Edward J. MacDonald 



Ellis Allen, Resigned 
Richard G. Connors 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Daniel Hogan 
Richard Middlesworth 
Robert W. Miller 
H. Tracy Mitchell 
Eric O'Brien 
Ann B. Thompson 



LAND MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 



April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1989 


April 


1990 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1986 
1986 
1986 
1986 
1986 
1986 
1986 
1986 
1986 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan April 1986 

MEDFIELD-NORFOLK PRISON PROJECT SCREENING COMMITTEE 
Arthur L. Farrar April 1986 



15 



MEDFIELD TOWN HISTORIAN Term Expires 

Laura H. Smith, Deceased April 1986 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

Margaret E. Bancroft April 1986 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Paul Curran April 1986 

Edward J. Fralen, Jr. April 1986 

Robert J. Larkin April 1986 

Police Chief William H. Mann April 1986 

Frank Mayer April 1986 

Irene L. O'Toole April 1986 

Fire Chief Joseph E. Ryan April 1986 

James F. Tubridy April 1986 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Ann B. Thompson April 1986 

PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 

Nancy J. Preston April 1987 

MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 

Nancy J. Preston April 1986 

PESTICIDE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Ellis N. Allen April 1987 

Dr. John H. Beal April 1987 

Dr. William M. Jackson April 1987 

Graeme Justice April 1987 

Robert A. Kinsman April 1987 

Alan D. Paul April 1987 

POLICE RADIO SYSTEM STUDY COMMITTEE 

Werner Kiessling Robert Naughton 

William H. Mann Charles Seavey Gene Piken 



REPRESENTATIVE TO "OUTER 64" MBTA COMMITTEE 
Gregg R. Streamer April 1986 

ACTING RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 
Edward J. Toomey April 1986 

JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Sarsfield Brennan April 1986 



16 



TRANSFER STATION LIAISON COMMITTEE 



Term Expires 



Kenneth M. 
Kenneth P. 
Michael J. 



Childs 
Feeney 
Sullivan 



Jr. 



128 WEST ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Thomas J. Donovan 



Nancy Acker-Wolfhagen 
Rick Aronstein 
Denise Barton 
Andrea Brockelman 
Julie Burke 
Lisa Cassidy 
Gay D'Amaro 
Joe DiGiovanni 
Eric Doucette 
Bart Garrison 
Mary Gillis 
John W. Heller 
Thomas LaPlante 
Patricia Lee 
Jim Leonard 
Jeff Lewis 
Sally MacDonald 
Heidi MacKinnon 
Molly Miner 
Barbara Ruzzo 
Vinnie Snipas 
Chris Swezey 
Derik Theriault 
Rob Wallace 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 



REDISTRICTING AND POLLING LOCATION COMMITTEE 



Gay D'Amaro 
William Dunlea 
Richard G. Connors 
William H. Mann 
Nancy J. Preston 
Ann B. Thompson 



April 1987 

April 1987 

April 1987 

April 1987 

April 1987 

April 1987 



SOUTH STREET COMMITTEE 



Edward J. Brabazon 
Sarsfield Brennan 



David Temple 



Daniel Fritzsche 
Joseph Parker 



17 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX 
COLLECTOR 

DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter Bartkewicz June M. Doucette Debra Greene 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
ASSESSORS 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor April 1986 

C.B. Doub, Assistant Assessor April 1986 

Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor April 1986 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN 
ACCOUNTANT 

Irene L. 'Toole. Assistant Accountant 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN 
CLERK 

Nancy S. Franke, Assistant Town Clerk 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF 

SELECTMEN 
CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL 

COMMITTEE AND 
MODERATOR TO REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE isib^i^i 

Albert C. Chouinard June 30, 1986 

18 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE 
CHIEF 

Term Expires 

Ellis N. Allen, Deputy Fire Chief 

Charles G. Seavey, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

George DeVenanzi, Lieutenant 

William Kingsbury, Lieutenant-Clerk 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE OUTREACH PROGRAM 

Lois Cardell April 1986 

William H. Mann April 1986 

Diane Wallace-Sangren April 1986 

Virginia Cusack April 1986 

Carol A. Nye April 1986 

Thomas M. Reis, Associate Member April 1986 

AGENTS 



William R. Domey, P.E. Engineer /Agent April 1986 

John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent April 1986 

Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant April 1986 

BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Jean P. Clark A. Ritchey Stagg, M.D. 

Madeleine I. Harding James D. Sullivan, M.D, 

Nancy C. Kashalena Rev. Robert L. Wood 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 
Tidal B. Henry April 1986 



19 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 



William Neeb 

Francis J. Cusack 

A. Lennox Brodeur, Resigned 

Fredrick Temple, Resigned 

Werner F. Kiessling 

Janet Taylor 

Neal Olsen 

Edith Beale 

Don Harding 

Robert Savage 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Martin J. McLaughlin 
Willard Roy 
Robert Gatti 



Term Expires 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1986 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1987 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


April 


1988 


November 30, 


1985 


November 30, 


1986 



November 30, 1987 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PLANNING BOARD 

MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



John Gagliani 

Robert A. Kinsman 

Nicholas J. Scobbo, Jr., Resigned 

Edward J. Brabazon 

Donald Church 

Sarah Schmid 

Paul Galante, Jr., Resigned 

Connie Jones 

Juliana Alasso 

Loretta Fader 

Robert M. Strong 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Ralph Costello 

Donald H. Harding 

Charles E. Mitchell, Resigned 

Richard Moon 

Daniel W. Nye 

Juliana Alasso 

Philip Bonanno 



BICYCLE PATH COMMITTEE 



Gregory Beedy 
George Bruns 
Richard P. DeSorgher 
Daniel V. Fritzsche 
Diane McCullough 
Margaret McLaughlin 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
David F. Temple 



June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1987 


June 


28, 


1988 


June 


28, 


1988 


June 


28, 


1988 


January 


15, 


1986 


January 


15, 


1986 


January 


15, 


1986 


January 


15, 


1987 


January 


15, 


1987 


January 


15, 


1988 


January 


15, 


1988 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 


June 


28, 


1986 



20 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1985 



21 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Town continues to grow gracefully with more renovated buildings 
lining our Main Street and business district, while orderly growth continues 
throughout the Town. 

1985 brought many major matters to the fore among which were increased 
insurance costs, final disposition of former St. Edward's Church, Cable TV 
installations, Medfield State Hospital programs, earth removal projects and 
study of South Street Extension. 

Selectman Larkin was absent from our January 22nd meeting when he 
attended the Presidential Inaugural of Ronald Reagan, at the invitation of 
Congressman Barney Frank. It was indeed an honor for Selectman Larkin and 
the Town. 

PERAMBULATION 



One of our more pleasant duties is to perambulate the Town bounds with 
our neighbor Selectmen which is required every five years. On October 19th 
we met with representatives of Millis, Norfolk, Dover and Walpole and found 
all bounds to be in the positions designated. The Selectmen of the Town of 
Sherborn advised they would perambulate on their own and will send us a re- 
port. 

NEW JURY SYSTEM 



Since the early beginnings of Medfield and the court system in Norfolk 
County, it has been the duty of the Selectmen to annually prepare a list of 
residents as potential jurors and each month the Clerk of the Board drew the 
names of those who would serve. The last jurors to be drawn by the Selectmen 
were drawn in December. Now every resident 18 and over is eligible to be 
drawn and when selected will be notified by mail by Norfolk County Superior 
Court to appear for one day only. One's obligation is over, unless assigned 
to a jury. This marks the end of another phase of local government. 

DISPOSITION OF FORMER ST. EDWARD'S CHURCH 

A judgment was received on February 19th that the judgment of the court 
in the case of Robert J. Shannon vs. Board of Appeals was reversed and a new 
judgment was entered stating that the Board of Appeals did not exceed its 
authority in its decision to deny certain variances. We were advised on 
March 12th that Mr. Shannon had appealed this judgment to the Supreme 
Judicial Court; we were notified April 2 that Mr. Shannon's application for 
further review was denied. Later that month, we were advised Mr. Shannon 
planned to construct low and moderate income housing on the lot. The pur- 
chase and sales agreement expired on April 23, 1982, however. On June 25th 
we received a temporary restraining order, prohibiting the razing of the 
building. A complaint was filed to direct the Town to convey the property 

. Shannon. Affidavits were presented to the Court from the Fire Chief, 
detailing fire hazards and the Police Chief, listing safety hazards in op- 

22 




SELECTMEN LARKIN, SELECTMAN THOMPSON AND SELECTMAN NOURSE 




CONGRESSMAN BARNEY FRANK MET WITH SELECTMAN LARKIN AND SELECTMAN THOMPSON 
TO DISCUSS FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT PROVISIONS. 



23 



position to the motion. On October 1, Town Counsel advised that Mr. Shannon 
will not appeal the judgment of Superior Court and the Board agreed the Town 
will not pursue recovery of costs against Mr. Shannon, which was provided in 
the judgment. 

On October 15, old St. Edward's was demolished. The corner stone was 
given to the new St. Edward the Confessor Church and the crosses were 
offered to the Baptist Church and new St. Edward's for use on their re- 
spective churches. 

FUTURE USE OF PROPERTY 



In October we appointed an ad hoc committee to study the reuse of 458 
Main Street and to present recommendations. Early in January the Committee 
presented its findings which are included separately in this annual report. 
The Selectmen submitted an application to the Council on Arts for a grant 
for a landscape architect. Additional funding to create a park and parking 
spaces behind the Memorial Public Library will be sought at the Annual Town 
Meeting in 1986. 

CABLE TV 



A provisional license was granted Massachusetts Cablevision Systems, 
Inc. on January 31st and a final license granted on August 20th. At year's 
end, the Town was substantially wired for cable service and the majority of 
the homes desiring service were on line. Again a committee with a great 
deal of expertise worked long and hard to provide this new service to the 
people of Medfield. 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL PROGRAMS 



Throughout this year, the Selectmen worked alongside our legislators, 
many residents and families of patients, known as the Alliance, to prevent 
a person found innocent of murdering his parents by reason of insanity from 
being transferred from a medium security facility of the Corrections Depart- 
ment to the Medfield State Hospital. Our efforts were in vain. It was a 
frustrating experience to find our opposition and fears for our residents 
went unheeded. 

The Medf ield-Norfolk Prison Project, limited to 36 persons and limited 
by certain criteria, provided labor for various projects within the 
community. This work proceeded after a majority vote of the Board in the 
affirmative and continued in to 1986. 

A proposal was heard to increase the prison population to 105. 

The future use of the 400+ acres and approximately 45 buildings is un- 
known at this time. We will continue to work toward being heard and opting 
for the best for the entire community. 

SOUTH STREET RECONSTRUCTION 

On March 11th, we received plans drawn by the Norfolk County Engineers; 
again on May 21st we reviewed the plan with the Bicycle Path Committee. The 
entire plan shows the construction within the right of way as laid out in 
1955 with the exception of Town-owned conservation land. Our primary con- 
cern is one of safety. The Committee's aim is to make the center of town 
accessible to school age children by bicycle. The Bicycle Path Committee 
would ultimately like to see the bike path continued to Route 27 to Curve 

24 



Street and to continue on a sidewalk on South Street over the railroad tracks 
to the Ralph Wheelock School (Elm Street). The Selectmen voted to proceed 
with plans for South Street, showing a 28-foot width and also a bike path 
and authorized the committee to meet with abutters and to come back with a 
full report. The South Street Committee's report is included elsewhere in 
this annual report wherein the majority recommend reconstruction. An article 
will be on the warrant at the Annual Town Meeting to vote on this important 
matter. 

FEDERAL LEGISLATION 



After 1986 we will no longer have federal revenue sharing funds to re- 
duce the Town's overall costs. This funding has been used for many years to 
reduce insurance costs. The federal government continues to mandate programs, 
however. The Fair Labor Standards Act was amended so that it now affects 
municipalities. It becomes effective in April 1986 and will have serious 
consequences, affecting the manner in which we can use our manpower and man- 
dating excessive costs of increased rates of overtime pay, while requiring 
complicated bookkeeping. 

INCREASED INSURANCE COSTS 

We had difficulty getting a quotation for public official liability 
insurance, reflecting problems in the insurance industry resulting from ex- 
cessive awards; and not because of town actions. We were fortunate to pur- 
chase a 3-year policy covering the School Department. Our package insurance 
was in jeopardy when the company at first refused to honor the second year of 
a 3-year policy. The matter was resolved in the Town's favor. Our automobile 
insurance costs doubled for this fiscal year even though we had an excellent 
insurance rating. Our worker's compensation insurance was placed with 
Massachusetts Inter Local Insurance Company who represents a group of Mass- 
achusetts municipalities. Group insurance premiums continue to rise also. 
The future of municipal insurance costs is discouraging to say the least. 
Although our insurance rating is good, in part because of our local prac- 
tices, we suffer from the follies of others and must meet these obligations. 

REDISTRICTING 

A Redistricting and Polling Location Committee was appointed March 26th 
in accordance with requirements set by the Secretary of State. Under the 
direction of the Town Clerk, it reported back on September 10, 1985, at which 
time we voted to accept and approve the local plan, to become effective 
January 1, 1987. This includes four precincts as follows (a map is included 
outlining the precincts) : 



ecinct 1 


2650 inhabitants 


2 


2396 


3 


2638 


4 


2646 



TOTAL 10330 

The average number is 2581. The smallest precinct has the potential for 
growth because of a development proposal at Main Street at the Dover town 
line, and on North Street at the former Marcionette-Kingsbury property. 

TOWN HALL IMPROVEMENTS 

The efficacy of Town Hall was improved with the installation of a new 

25 




26 



state-of-the art telephone system which permits paging, conference calls and 
the use of speaker phones. 

Word processors were utilized for the first time and promise to provide 
innovative approaches to reduce the volume of paper work required to conduct 
the day-to-day business of town government. 

TRANSFER STATION 



We voted to award the bid to Sciaba Construction Company at a cost of 
$794,200., subject to assignment of the land from the Human Services 
Administration since 3.76 acres was to be transferred from the Corps of 
Engineers for this purpose. This was finalized early in 1986. 

ELECTIONS 

On October 22nd, the Selectmen met with the remaining members of the 
Park and Recreation Commission and elected Mary Gillis to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Paul Allen; and on December 4th, Mark C. O'Connor 
was elected to fill the vacancy on the Housing Authority caused by the res- 
ignation of William Walsh, both terms to expire at the next election. 

HURRICANE GLORIA 

On September 27th the Town was brought to a virtual standstill with the 
onslaught of Gloria. It was the first such emergency in many years. The 
Town forces, - highway, police, fire, tree and civil defense, worked along- 
side local Boston Edison crews as well as crews from as far away as Chicago, 
to bring the power back on line. Certain areas of Town suffered longer than 
others. We will meet with power line officials who are preparing reports to 
explain their lines into Medfield and their emergency plan, so that the re- 
turn of power can be expedited in the future. 

TRIBUTES 

Laura Huntington Smith was a revered lady in our Town and was greatly 
missed by her many friends and admirers, following her demise in April. She 
was well known as a descendent of the early founders of the Town. She gave 
much to this community during her lifetime as a teacher, historian and 
librarian as well as contributing to the makeup of our present charter. 

John Bradstreet was honored with a plaque presented by the Selectmen 
commemorating 32 years of public service as a member of the Finance Committee, 
Planning Board and Conservation Commission. 

Ellis N. Allen, Tree Warden resigned after 34 years of service to the 
Town. A proclamation was issued recognizing his valued service. Ellis, too, 
was a descendent of the early settlers. His service as Tree Warden followed 
that of his Grandfather, George L. Allen, which combined totalled 76 years, 
an enviable record of public service. 

In May the Board of Selectmen, town employees and friends paid tribute 
to Pauline M. Goucher, Administrator Assistant^ f or 25 years of dedicated 
service to the town. She has worked with 18 different Selectmen and 2 Town 
Administrators during this period, and has been instrumental in assuring an 
orderly transition throughout the years. 

In July a proclamation was issued honoring Virginia Kinter upon her 
retirement as Deputy Collector of Taxes, after 15 years of valued servxce. 

27 



On Memorial Day the Town once again displayed its patriotic spirit, 
carrying on a long standing tradition. The Gettysburg Address was delivered 

:ss Janet Timmerman, a 7th grader whose delivery made the speech ex- 
tremely meaningful. The addition of the fife and drum corps and the Mass- 
achusetts National Lancers made the parade a memorable event for those 
participating as well as the folks lining the parade route. 

The Medfield Day celebration under the auspices of MEMO (Medfield 
Employers and Merchants Organization) was a great success and a joyful oc- 
casion which brings our townspeople together. We hope the custom continues. 
The Christmas Parade is another annual event we look forward to each year. 
It was an exceptionally wonderful parade this year. Our appreciation is ex- 
tended to the many townspeople who worked so hard to provide these local 
events. 

We are pleased to report that the 1984 Annual Town Report was awarded 
third prize by the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association. All who contri- 
bute to the report share in this award. 

The town boards, officers, employees and volunteers who work together 
to make Medfield the fine community we call home are commended for taking 
pride in Medfield and working toward present and future successes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann 8. Thompson, Chairman 

RobzAX J. LaAkln, Clerk 

WWLLtm F. hlouAMi 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




DORCAS, OWEN, THE FRIENDLY AND EFFICIENT RECEPTIONIST AT TOWN HALL 
UTILIZING NEW TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



28 




SELECTMAN LARKIN, CHAIRMAN OF MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE, AND SELECTMAN THOMPSON 




■ 

JANET TIMMERMAN, WHO DELIVERED THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS ON MEMORIAL DAY, AND 
MICHAEL J. SULLIVAN, TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

29 



STREETS, WATER, AND SEWER 
DEPARTMENTS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Herewith is respectfully submitted my Annual Report for the year ending 
December 31, 1985. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 



Resurfacing : Yearly preventative maintenance involved repairing streets by 
means of grader, patch and the stone seal program. The Highway Department 
put on 1,784 tons of hot top and 600 tons of stone in 1985. 

Drainage : Rocky Lane drainage was started and will be finished in 1986. I 
wish to thank Barbara Leighton for the drainage easement. 

Community Gardens : We had another good year at the gardens. Don't forget 
to sign up in March for the new year. 

Pleasant Street Sidewalk : The sidewalk from Oak Street to Metacomet Park 
was completed in the Fall of 1985. 

Fire Roads : Fire roads were kept clear by the Highway Department and small 
tree plantings were made. 

Tennis Courts : Cracks in the Pleasant Street courts and vandalism to the 
nets were repaired in the Summer of 1985. 

Snow : We had a mild winter with only 11 snowstorms and 27 call-outs for 
sanding and salting operations. We turned $16,536.50 back to the General 
Fund. Total accumulation for the year was 3 1% inches. 

Landfill : The Highway Department started capping the Phase II area of the 
Landfill and will continue into 1986. In December we moved into Phase III. 
It now appears, with the compaction we will get at the Transfer Station, we 
may get five years of use out of the Landill. 

Transfer Station: We broke ground on the new Transfer Station in October 
1985 and will be opening in June 1986. 

Orchard Street Bridge : In the Summer of 1985 the bridge was open to through 
traffic after some delays in the construction. 

Demolition : Old St. Edward's Church on Main Street was demolished in October 
by a private contractor. The Highway Department filled in the foundation 
and hauled the granite foundation back to the Highway Garage. 

Hurricane Gloria : Late in September, Medfield experienced its first Hurri- 
cane since 1955. It started blowing around noontime and peaked around 4- 
5 P.M. All roads were cleared for emergency vehicles with at least one 
lane open by 9:00 P.M. of the same day. Unfortunately, some people lost 
electricity for 5 days. The debris removal following the storm took the 
Highway Department 6 weeks. 

30 





LANDFILL REACHES ITS LIMIT WHILE TRANSFER STATION IS UNDERWAY 



31 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

The Treatment plant is now 10 years old and major overhauls of return 
pumps showed the age. 

Composting ; This summer the Highway Department build a composting pad 
for the sludge at the Treatment Plant. The operators at the Treatment Plant 
immediately started the new process. The composted material will be used as 
fertilizer at the Landfill for the final cover. 

State Hospital Tie-in : On December 10th the State Hospital came on line 
at the rate of 90,000 gallons per day. This will add approximately $68,000 
in revenue to the Town. 

Dover Septage ; Treatment of Dover septage will add approximately 
$28,000 in revenue. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 



In 1985 the Water Department installed 66 new services. According to 
our pumping records we pumped 267,750,000 gallons from 4 wells. The well ex- 
ploration has been narrowed down to a well site on the North side of Town on 
State Hospital property. Test results will not be ready until 1986. 
Complaints of rusty water during 1985 on Bridge Street have prompted an 
article in the Town Meeting of 1986. 

We have had both a good year and a bad year; the latter marked by a 
severe accident to John D. Williams, member of the Water and Sewerage Board 
since 1947. The accident has hospitalized Jack since August of this year. 
The prognosis is not encouraging, but we are ever hopeful that he will im- 
prove. Jack's contributions and dedication to the Town of Medfield are 
greatly missed. 

In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to Frances Brennan, Gertrude 
Simpson and Nancy Franke, secretaries whose work contributes to the success- 
ful operation of the several departments. 

Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman; Charles Evans, Water and 
Sewer Foreman, and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of the Treatment Plant, and 
all the men of the various departments are commended for their excellent 
public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

K<tmio£h P. Fe.en£(/, Superintendent 



32 




ORCHARD STREET BRIDGE 




? ■ 



* 



TYPICAL OF "OLD MEDFIELD" IS CAUSEWAY STREET VIEW AT THE BRIDGE 

Photo by Laila Kain 
33 



SOUTH STREET COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The South Street Committee was appointed in July, 1985, to consider the 
South Street woadway reconstruction plan and make recommendations for Town 
Meeting action. The plan to be considered was that proposed in 1955 and 
amended from time to time, the most recent amendment being by the Norfolk 
County Engineer's office earlier in 1985. 

The South Street Committee studied the plan, met with practically each 
and every abutter, met with the County Engineer and the Town Planning Board, 
and submitted its recommendations and comments in January 1986. 

A majority of four members recommended proceeding with design and con- 
struction of an improvement project to reconstruct a wider, straighter, road- 
way with a sidewalk, curbs, and proper drainage, all built to Town standards. 
The recommendation included ensuring maximum sensitivity to aesthetics and 
protection of abutting property consistent with safety. Safety was the over- 
riding issue with the majority, citing heavy traffic volume, poor lines of 
sight, inadequate width, poor drainage, no shoulders, and a high accident 
rate. 

The minority recommendation was to preserve the roadway as it exists, 
rather than widen and rebuild it. The fear of increased speed and the desire 
to maintain the character of the roadway were cited as key factors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EdwaAd ZKabazon 

ScvufazZd Bfinnnan 

Va.YU.2JL VnJXz&cko,, Chairman 

Jo6zph VankoA 
V civ id Tmplz 

SOUTH STREET COMMITTEE 



M 



COMMITTEE FOR THE RE-USE OF 
458 MAIN STREET 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following contains our recommendations for Re-use of the former St. 
Edward's Church Property and design criteria. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The property at 458 Main Street offers the town the unique opportunity 
to coordinate the Library, the Historical Society Building, the abutting 
properties, and the Town Hall into an aesthetically pleasing site. It is 
recommended that a professional landscape architect be retained by the town 
to provide a design consistent with the design criteria suggested in this 
report. 

RECOMMENDATION FOR RE-USE 



Based on opinions expressed by town residents, town Boards and through 
surveys, the consensus emerged that the property should be devoted largely to 
green space attractively and appropriately designed for use by the community. 
A desire for limited parking for municipal and library purposes was also ex- 
pressed. Such limited parking would offer space for the handicapped, the 
library staff, library patrons, and the Historical Society. A sign at the 
entrance to the parking area should specify this area's purpose. 

DESIGN CRITERIA 



The overall design should be in keeping with the surrounding buildings 
and the "textures" used in the area in front of the Town Hall. Any structure 
or item placed in the park should be designed for permanence. Special needs 
or problems of the handicapped should be addressed. 

1. Parking 



A. The Committee recommends that the area between the library and the 
Historical Society and the area directly behind the Historical Society be 
designated for parking. 

B. One space should be reserved for handicapped. 

C. A sign specifying the area's purpose should be erected at the 
entrance. 

D. Landscaping should be used around the parking area to soften the 
impact of the hardtop. 

2. Landscape Materials 

A. There should be an aesthetically pleasing combination of flowering 
and shade trees, flowering and evergreen shrubs, grass, and bark mulch where 
appropriate. The two dogwood trees in the front of the property and any 
other trees on the periphery of the property should be saved. 

35 



B. Placement of the landscape materials should be such that the area 
can |, ( v the mowing equipment used by the town. 

Buffer Zones should be placed where appropriate between abutters and 
the town property for lighting, noise and visual purposes. An attractive 
fence with landscaping in front of it should be placed around the property 
t where walkways enter the property. 

D. Access to water throughout the area is a necessity. 

3. Gazebo 

Based on opinions expressed at public meetings, it is the recommendation 
of this committee that a gazebo of appropriate size be used as the focal 
point of the green area. It should be aesthetically consistent with sur- 
rounding structures, be accessible to the handicapped, and be lighted. A 
brick patio area with benches around the gazebo should also be considered. 

■alkways 

A. Should be made of brick (City Hall Pavers as used in front of the 
Town Hall), laid in sand, and maintained with stone dust. 

B. Should give access to the property and buildings there-on from Main 
Street, Pleasant Street and Lord's parking lot following the anticipated 
natural pedestrian flow. 

5. Lighting 

A. The area must be well enough lighted to make it safe. All lighting 
should take into consideration encroachment on the abutters. 

B. Pole lights similar to those in front of the Town Hall (New Orleans 
Gas Lights which have particular significance in Medfield's history) should 
be used wherever possible to provide lighting. 

C. Auxiliary lighting should consist of spotlights and/or inconspicuous 
ground lighting along the walkways. 

6. Benches should be placed where appropriate. 

7. Attractive trash receptacles should be placed where necessary. 

8. Granite Berms should be used where appropriate. 

9. The 3 outside ground air conditioning units belonging to the library 
should be hidden from view by landscaping. 

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS 

1 . Placques 

It is recommended that an appropriate plaque be placed in the park com- 
memorating all war veterans and one which designates the historical signifi- 
cance of this site. 

2. Name for the Park 

Two names were recommended: Heritage Memorial Park and Medfield Memorial 

36 



Park. This committee suggests a town contest to name the park. 
3. Funding 

A. Memorial gifts and other contributions should be solicited from 
private citizens and civic and service organizations for landscaping and 
other items. 

B. The Medfield Prison Project should be utilized for laying the brick 
sidewalks and for providing any other appropriate assistance on this project. 

C. The committee recommends seeking additional funding at the 1986 Annual 
Town Meeting, if necessary, to ensure that sufficient funds are available to 
complete this project in 1986. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John GagLiani, Chairman 
Jam kh.Qh.QJi, Secretary 
WalXeji Vmrnk 
Thzima SplcoA 
Roy Wcut&on 




37 




~~.j£fr^ 1 • 

AND THE CHURCH CAME TUMBLING DOWN 



38 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my fifteenth Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

We have had another busy year. We experienced three incendiary build- 
ing fires within a four day period in June, which taxed my department to the 
limit. We are very thankful for the excellent training that our personnel 
have received. Because of the well trained firefighters there were no in- 
juries to the men or anyone else at these fires. 

We awarded the bid for our new Brush Fire Engine and hope to have it by 
Spring. We are pleased to report that our present equipment is in good run- 
ning condition. 

We have added two new members to the department since my last report. 
They are Stephen Klotz and David 0' Toole. 

Again this year I am urging the residents to properly mark their houses 
with numbers that are large enough to be seen from the street. Mailboxes 
should be marked by those people who live on the outskirts of town. 

Our smoke detector inspections have increased. I would like to remind 
the residents who have battery operated detectors in their homes that they 
should change the batteries annually. 

I have completed quarterly inspections in all schools and the Nursing 
Home and have inspected all businesses and multiple apartment buildings 
throughout the year. 

I would like to thank the other Town Departments for their cooperation 
this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jo.6e.pfi E. Ryan, 
Fire Chief 



39 



RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1985 

Buildings 15 

Brush & Grass 65 

Automobiles 13 

Rubbish 2 

Gasoline Washdowns 5 

Highway Accidents 6 

Electrical 30 

Investigations 115 

Oil or Gas Burners 11 

Mutual Aid 6 

Outside Assistance 9 

Accidental Alarms 49 

Chimneys 7 

Searches 1 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 2 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 5 

Oil Storage Permits 46 

Blasting Permits 26 

Model Rocket Permits 11 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 51 

Woodburning Stove Inspections 28 

Motor Oil Storage Permits 

Ammunition Permits 

Trains 

Lock Outs 5 

Water Problems 4 

Bomb Scares 

Pumping Cellars 

Box Alarms 152 

Still Alarms 210 

False Alarms 11 

Station Duty 

Landfill 

Televisions 

Rescues 1 

Ovens 4 

Details 7 

Fence 3 

Outdoor Burning Permits 774 

Explosive Permits 

Inspections 98 

Propane Gas Permits 11 

Black Powder Permits 7 

Smokeless Powder Permits 8 

Fire Marshal Reports 21 

Bonfire Permits 1 

Derailments 

Resale Inspections 225 



40 




CHAIRMAN 
SENATOR DAVID LOCKE AND SELECTMAN/ANN THOMPSON AT TOUR OF MEDFIELD STATE 
HOSPITAL WITH STATE AND LOCAL OFFICIALS 

Photo by Laila Kain 




FIRE CHIEF RYAN 
41 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

PERSONNEL 

We had no changes in the uniformed personnel during 1985. We did, how- 
ever, have difficulty hiring interns for the fourth position on desk duty. 
John Ryan of Millis worked from January through March. From April through 
August, we had to use part-time officers and regular officers. Since 
September, Paul Sicard of Westwood has worked as an intern. John Wilhelmi, 
Carol Ann Palmieri and Patricia Rioux have worked as dispatchers, but Miss 
Palmieri resigned in December. Several applications were received, but no 
one was hired by year's end. This causes quite a problem covering all desk 
shifts as we continually have open shifts in uniformed positions due to in- 
service schooling, vacations and holidays. We also could not find another 
intern to work when Paul Sicard returned to school the first week of January 
1986. 

Rose Mattozzi resigned as our part-time secretary in August. Georganne 
Iverson-Kelly was rehired in this position. 

TRAINING 



All regular officers attended in-service training between September 1984 
and March 1985. Again this year, all officers will have attended one week 
each of in-service training between September 1985 and March 1986. The 
school used by the Criminal Justice Training Council began in Dale Street 
School, moved to Foxboro in January 1985. Sergeant Clancy continues to be 
on the Board of Directors of the training academy and assists in establish- 
ing proper programs for the week of training. This term, firearms training 
is included as well as suicide prevention as required by state statute. 

All permanent intermittent officers have attended a reserve/intermittent 
course. The course is for one evening per week for fourteen weeks. Special 
officers and auxiliary police officers are now attending also. 

Sergeant Kerr attended a Sergeant's course in management at the train- 
ing academy in Foxboro. 

EQUIPMENT 

As is customary, we replaced two cruisers again in 1985. Fortunately, 
we haven't had any major breakdowns recently. 

The department received $150,000 at the Annual Town Meeting to buy a 
complete new radio system. Engineers from the Motorola Radio Corp. have 
been working on the plans and shortly, we should receive a quotation showing 
prices of various equipment and the design of items needed to outfit us with 
a new system on the 470 frequency. It will take 5-6 months for delivery and 

42 



installation after it is ordered by the Selectmen 

I was able to apply for and receive a grant of $3,000 towards the pur- 
chase of an intoxilizer to replace our outmoded 7 year old breathalyzer. The 
unit was received in October and officers are attending school as spaces be- 
come available. 

Our computer in the station connecting to the Criminal Justice Infor- 
mation System has been in place and working fine, allowing us rapid infor- 
mation on automobile listings and warrant information on fugitives. I have 
been looking into the computer systems available to use in the station to 
revamp our records and remodel our dispatching and logging of activity. Many 
departments have changed from a paper system to a computer system for more 
efficiency and less paper work. 

I am still pursuing the Enhanced 911 emergency telephone system for 
Medfield. The 911 phone has been in use in Medfield for emergency calls 
since 1971 but in the near future E911 should be available wherein the police 
dispatcher will be able to determine the address and phone number of the 
caller immediately upon receiving a 911 call. This will greatly reduce the 
chance for error and allow a quick response to those that may excitedly call 
and hang up before relaying their address to us. 

Traffic lights have had very little problems during 1985. A new control 
system, paid for by 1984 capital equipment funds, was installed at Main and 
North Streets and has worked fine. I have requested funds for replacing the 
controls at Main, Spring and North Meadows Road. Once we have that done, we 
will not have as much chance of long breakdowns as is the situation now. 

The department as a whole had no major problems, no extended sick or 
injured leaves and crime was down slightly. We seem to be very busy just 
covering our patrol areas and assistance calls. 

On September 27 when Hurricane Gloria paid us a visit in Medfield, it 
was gratifying to have many police officers and dispatchers report to work 
to help our regular shifts. Many others were extremely helpful to me; the 
EMT'S , Auxiliary Police, Tree Warden, Highway and Fire Departments and many 
citizens who called or stopped in to offer the use of a chain saw, four- 
wheeled drive vehicle or trucks. Bob Ness and his son, Ken, kept the de- 
partment supplied with coffee throughout the day. 

With all the new areas being developed in town, and the numerous days 
off by officers for training, vacations, etc., I have again requested 2 ad- 
ditional officers to be added to the department. The Fair Labor Standards 
Act may cause considerable problems for me in regards to bookkeeping as it 
appears there is a lot of recordkeeping required and I only have a part-time 
secretary to do all police records, correspondence and ambulance billing 
records. 

Thank you to all who assisted the department and me throughout the year; 
all Town Departments, Town Hall Employees and the Selectmen. 

Again, I wish to thank the Auxiliary Police and their director, Vin 
Cellucci, for all their help during the year, especially on Medfield Day. 
They volunteered many hours at parades, Halloween, 4th of July and during 
emergencies. Their help is greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WlLLlam H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 

43 



STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1985 ARE AS FOLLOWS : 

ents Reported 250 

Personal Injuries 34 

Pedestrian 2 

Fatalities 1 

Hit and Run 60 

Bicycles 5 

Ambulance Trips 306 

Arrests 140 

Arson 9 

Assistance 

To other Departments 315 

Motorists and Stranded People 318 

General 786 
Automobiles 

Reported Stolen 12 

Stolen Vehicles Recovered 15 

Citations Issued 461 

Breaking and Entering 31 

Attempted 6 

Burglar Alarms Answered 745 

Bomb Scares 1 

Civil Matters and Family Problems 60 

Closed Homes Checked 66 

Court Attendance 132 

Disturbances 31 

Emergency Calls 278 

Fires Responded to by Police 97 

Doors Found Unlocked or Open 158 

Window Found Unlocked or Open 17 

Persons Held in Protective Custody 23 

Funeral Escorts 46 

Investigations of Miscellaneous Complaints 1,264 
Larceny 

Under $100.00 93 

Over $100.00 79 

Bicycles 13 

Motor Vehicles 12 

Shoplifting 16 

Attempted Larceny 21 

Lost Children Reported 2 

Lost Children Found by Police 3 

Malicious Destruction of Property 242 

Mischievious Acts 138 

Missing Patients from State Hospital 62 

Missing Patients Located by Police 19 

Missing Persons Reported 30 

Missing Persons Located 7 

Messages Delivered 33 

Permits Issued 

Gunsmith 

Ammunition 2 

Firearms Dealer 2 

Firearms ID Card 51 

Pistol Permits 75 

Bicycle Registration 53 

Stolen Bicycle Recovered 4 

Power Failure 22 

44 



Sudden Deaths Investigated 

Summons Served 

Suspicious Vehicles 

Suspicious Persons 

Suspicious or Annoying Calls 

Injured Adults 

Injured Children 

Assaults 

Wires Down 

False Alarms 

Suicide and Attempted Suicides 

Commitments 

Accostings 

Indecent Exposure 

Rape 

Attempted Rape 



7 

31 

114 

106 

81 

15 

10 

15 

13 

12 

1 



3 

2 








CHRISTMAS PARADE 1985 



Photo by Laila Kain 



45 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The year 1985 was not as busy as some years in the past. A total of 
306 trips were logged, 134 to Leonard Morse Hospital, 61 to Norwood Hospital, 
54 to Glover Memorial Hospital, and 36 to Framingham Union Hospital. Forty- 
five of our trips were from the State Hospital. We sent mutual aid to Millis 
3 times and received mutual aid from Millis 18 times and once from Dover. 
Twenty-two EMT'S participated in our ambulance service during 1985. We are 
always looking for new volunteer EMT'S, especially during summer months and 
during the daytime. We have lost several of those participating in 1985 due 
to relocation or job changes. 

The ambulance was once again on display at Medfield Day and blood 
pressures taken of anyone wishing it by Ann Thompson, Joan Kiessling and 
Glen Jackson. Many hours of CPR instruction have been given during the year 
to any citizens that wish it. It is our desire to teach CPR to everybody in 
town. The ambulance was also brought to schools to make the young people 
familiar with it. 

Ann Thompson continued to schedule coverage and covered many shifts 
herself and also recorded type and time of trips in her computer, making it 
considerably easier for me. Thanks to all the EMTS. but especially to Ann 
Thompson and Bob Currie who conducted training sessions throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W-LlLLam H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 



46 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense Director for the year 
ending December 31, 1985. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act as a liaison 
between the Selectmen and the Town Departments. The Civil Defense Director 
is also in charge of the Auxiliary Police under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and Halloween, our 
Auxiliary Police and Radio Operators were again requested to assist in the 
following events: 

- Memorial Day activities 

- Traffic control June 1985 road race 

- Traffic control for the Medfield Day (MEMO DAY) and 
Christmas Parade activities. 

During Hurricane Gloria, September 27, 1985, we were called into service 
to open the shelter at the Dale Street School which was powered with elect- 
ricity by one of our generators. We patroled the roads of the Town and re- 
ported damage and hazards to the Town via radio, and were ready to provide 
electricity with our second generator where an emergency existed. On the 
following day, we made arrangements for showers to be available at the Jr. 
High School and maintained the building during those hours for those people 
who were still without power. 

I wish to express my sincere thanks to the men and women of the Auxiliary 
Police for their cooperation throughout the past year, also, to the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael Sullivan and his staff, Police Chief Mann, Fire Chief Ryan 
for sharing his quarters for our E.O.C. Room and the Highway Department and 
our many other friends . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vincent M. C&llucci, 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



47 



DWARE 'nc 1 

RICAL SUPPLIES 

TOYS -PAINTS 


[ Moon *. J 
kPMMSj 


r ■ - - — ' "JErw"^ ; 



PREPARATIONS FOR HURRICANE GLORIA 





ALL IS QUIET DURING THE EYE OF THE STORM, HURRICANE GLORIA 

48 




jtS, 



m& 




AND ITS AFTERMATH 



UN 




49 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



tie Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Animal Control Officer for the year ending 
December 31, 1985. 

1985 has seen some good changes. Fewer dogs run loose in Medfield. 
Dog owners are beginning to realize the leash law is for their own good. 
We still have those few owners who continue to show disregard for the leash 
law but the problem has lessened. 

Over eleven hundred animal related calls were logged and answered. 
These ranged from raccoons swimming in pools, tropical birds flying through 
the pine trees to horses in the streets in the early morning hours. We 
still have a cat problem and as in the past have found it necessary to re- 
quest the aid of the Animal Rescue League. 

As always, our special thanks to Chief Mann for his support and under- 
standing. To the Medfield Police Officers, without whose assistance we 
could not function, you have our sincerest thanks and appreciation. 

There are two people who make a difficult job easier; Jenny Shaw and 
Steve Shaw. You have my thanks. 

For all our friends who have made donations over the past year, you 
are very much appreciated and needed. 



Citations 127 

Adopted 11 

Put to sleep 2 

Cats killed 40 

Dogs killed 5 

Bites and scratches 7 

Individual dogs licensed 1,069 
Kennel licenses 19 

Respectfully submitted. 

LoiuJtd Va.pa.do y-lcinnJJ> 

Animal Control Officer 



50 



THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report for 1985. 

Thirteen dog bites, 2 cat bites and 1 mouse bite were reported. In all 
cases, except for the mouse and one dog, all animals were quarantined. All 
quarantined animals showed no sign of illness after 10 days. The dog not 
quarantined was an unknown animal in the area and all efforts made to locate 
it were unsuccessful. The mouse was observed but not quarantined upon direct 
orders from the State Laboratory, the reason being that mice are not rabies 
indicated rodents. 

All livestock in Medfield have met with all the rules and regulations of 
both town and state. At the time of inspections we had 47 horses, 3 ponies, 
2 donkeys, 15 sheep, and 7 cattle. All barns meet with regulations for water, 
air flow and cleanliness. All horses had been innoculated for encephalomyetis 
prevention. 

I wish to thank Animal Control Officers, Louise Papadayannis, f or her 
assistance during the year. I also wish to thank Mae Otting for her con- 
tinued assistance for which I am most grateful. 

I am honored to serve the Town of Medfield, its people and its 
animals . 

Respectfully submitted, 

KaAtn Ma.cGiQ.goti, 
Animal Inspector 

Vfi. WllbuA SaJUnA, 
Assistant Animal Inspector 



51 



THE WATER & SEWERAGE 
BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand Gallons Used 
Thousand Gallons Sold 

Water Revenue Received: 

Water Rates 
Water Services 

Expenses 
Debt Services 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

Total Units 

Added Units 

Sewer Use Charge 

Sewer Installation Permits 

Sewer Installers' Fee 

Septic Waste Disposal Fees 

Expenses 



1984 


1985 


1986 


Actual 


Actual 


Estimated 


2,910 


2,950 


3,000 


56 


40 


50 


352,851 


367,758 


400,000 


271,301 


276,869 


300,000 


$271,301. 


$240,780. 


$300,000, 


3,587. 


3,264. 


3,000, 


219,016. 


227,639. 


237,000, 


800,000. 


800,000. 


800,000, 


766 


818 


850 


58 


52 


32 


$ 145,000. 


$131,724. 


$150,000. 


1,500. 


1,420. 


1,500. 


400. 


475. 


500. 


21,099. 


25,282. 


26,000. 


$ 166,381. 


$ 178,199. 


$200,000. 



52 



TREE AND INSECT 
PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calender year ending December 31, 1985. 

On September 27, 1985 we were hit by Hurricane Gloria. This was a rough 
way of breaking me in as your new Tree Warden, since we didn't have a tree 
crew. With many thanks to the men of the Highway, Water, and Sewer Depart- 
ments, we were able to keep the roads open during the storm, and clean up 
afterward. Thanks to some funds we were able to hire outside tree crews to 
remove the dangerous hangers and broken or split limbs, along with the many 
piles of brush on the roadside. 

Since the Tree Department had no equipment prior to Hurricane Gloria, 
all routine pruning and removal of dead or dying trees had to be postponed. 

Hopefully with next year's budget we will be able to get back on a 
regular pruning and planting program, as many of the towns trees are in need 
of care, in order to keep the streets and sidewalks safe for public travel. 

The Dutch Elm Disease seems to be slowing down in its destruction of 
the town Elms but it sometimes seems like a losing battle. 

Diseased Elms are removed before the next growing season, and some of 
the more prominent Elms are pruned. The usual sprays were applied for the 
Elm leaf beetle and for the Elm bark beetle. 

We did some spot spraying for Gypsy Moths on the east side of town at 
the end of May. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Malcolm J. Gibson, 

Tree Warden 

Superintendent of Insect Pest Control 



./■0*& 




53 



THE NORFOLK COUNTY 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven technologies into 
a system of mosquito control that is rational, safe, effective and economi- 
cally feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Source Reduction Work: Our primary efforts are concentrated on the 
draining of shallow, standing, stagnant water and the maintenance of exist- 
ing flow systems which contribute to mosquito breeding sources. 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 4,147 feet 

Drainage construction by wide-track backhoe 4,106 feet 

Larviciding: Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development 
is the next most effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 194 acres 

Catch basin larvicide application 197 count 

Adulticiding: The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes 
necessary when they are numerous, annoying or threatening to residents. 

Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 69 acres 

Adulticide U.L.V. from trucks 12,416 acres 

Surveys, inspections and monitoring in support of our programs include 
locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections and field- 
work evaluations leading to better drainage. 

The Project received 26 calls from residents for information and 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. SmiXh, 
Superintendent 



54 



THE PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Just when we thought that the supply of developable land in Medfield 
was dwindling, six residential subdivisions containing a total of sixty-six 
single-family lots and two site plans for fourteen condominium units were 
approved in 1985. Many of the lots approved will be difficult to develop due 
to ledge, water table, drainage, wetlands, soil conditions and other physical 
characteristics . 

Seven industrial and commercial site plans were approved and one indus- 
trial subdivision was approved, rescinded and resubmitted. 

The Planning Board is also currently revising its Land Subdivision Rules 
6^ Regulations . These are the engineering and design guidelines used by the 
Board for the construction of roads and other improvements within subdivisions, 

The following describes in some detail the activities of the Planning 
Board during 1985: 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS : 

The 1985 Annual Town Meeting approved an amendment to the Zoning Bylaw 
permitting a family apartment in a single-family dwelling under certain con- 
ditions with a Special Permit from the Board of Appeals. Other changes in 
the Zoning Bylaw were under Section 12, a new requirement for restoration of 
property if earth is removed illegally and under Section 14.9, adding one 
more associate member to the Board of Appeals, making a new total of three 
members . 

Seven streets were accepted as public ways; namely, Jefferson Way, Garry 
Drive, Hummingbird Way, Oriole Road, Blacksmith Drive, Fieldstone Drive and 
Larkspur Lane. 

The town meeting unanimously voted to rezone a parcel at the corner of 
West and West Mill Streets from IE to RU. 

INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT: 



1985 was a busy year for Medfield in the area of commercial and indus- 
trial development, considering the relatively small amount of commercial and 
industrial land still available for development. 

The Planning Board reviewed the following commercial and industrial site 
plans: 

A parking/drainage plan for a small industrial site on North Meadows 
Road was approved. 

A revised Site Plan for office/retail space at 458 Main Street was 
approved. 

55 



: expansion o( the Ml'M Industrial building at the corner 
•ws Road and West Street was approved. 

A site plan Eor Nedfield Industrial Park was approved. 

Lte plan Eor the enlargement of E.C. Adams Company was withdrawn. 

A site plan for Mobile Excavating was withdrawn. 

An industrial subdivision was approved for Medfield Technology Park; 
however, this subdivision was rescinded by the Planning Board and an ap- 
plication for resubmission has been received. 

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT : 

The Board approved six residential subdivisions during 1985; namely, 
Wampatuck Subdivision, 35 lots; Doe Acres Subdivision (Hickory Drive), 9 
lots; Tocci-Dorfman (Hickory Drive, 5 lots; Castle Hill Subdivision (Deer- 
field Drive), 9 lots; Country Meadows Subdivision (Briar Hill Road), 5 lots; 
Jorie Lane Subdivision, no lots in Medfield; and Sheep Farm Lane (off Kaymark 
Drive) 1 lot and Cranmore Road within Belknap Estates, containing 7 lots, 
has been reactivated. 

Two site plans for multifamily units were approved; seven condominium 
units at 73 Spring Street and seven units at 10 West Mill Street. 

Twenty-two plans under Subdivision Control not required were signed by 
the Board in 1985. Twenty-eight lots were released for building within sub- 
divisions during 1985. (See Schedule.) 

The Board held four Scenic Way hearings, one for Noon Hill Street, to 
allow the removal of a portion of a stonewall which was to be replaced; one 
for a Causeway Street driveway; two for the same Pine Street driveway. 

OTHER BUSINESS : 

Members of the Planning Board served on several other Town committees, 
including the Capital Budget Committee, the Solid Waste Disposal Committee, 
the Bicycle Path/South Street Committee, Drainage Study Committee, School 
Reuse Committee and Reuse of Church Property Committee, as well as being 
liaisons with the Board of Selectmen, Warrant Committee, Board of Assessors, 
Superintendent of Streets, Water and Sewer Board, Housing Authority, 
Hazardous Waste Committee, MPIC, Central Business District, Park and Rec- 
reation Commission, YAC Recreational Review Commission, the Board of Appeals, 
School Committee, Sign Advisory Board, Historical Commission, Conservation 
Commission, Board of Health, Building Inspector, Landfill Committee, De- 
velopment and Industrial Board and Industrial Authority. 

Six appointments were made to the MPIC and two appointments to the 
Sign Advisory Board. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assis- 
tance of other Town Boards and Departments during the year, with special 
thanks to Town Counsel, Charles Fuller, Jr., Zoning Enforcing Of ficer /Build- 
ing Inspector, John O'Toole, Street Superintendent Kenneth Feeney, Street 
Foreman, Robert Kennedy. 



56 



Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 8:00 p.m. at the 
Town House and are open to the public. Appointments with the Board must be 
made by the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Requests for information or 
appointments should be directed to the Planning Administrator, Mildred E. 
Willis, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S(VU> fael-d P. Bimnan, Chairman 
JoA&ph R. VankQJi, JJl. , Vice Chairman 
MaAgtVieA E. BancAO&t, Secretary 
Jokn K. Gagliavii 
Va.Yu.dL W. Nye. 




NEWLY RENOVATED MEDFIELD DEPOT 



57 



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58 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1985 the Sign Advisory Board has continued to review all applica- 
tions for sign permits as well as continue its policy of advising and assist- 
ing applicants on questions pertaining to signage. 

The Sign Advisory Board has also brought to the attention of the Zoning 
Enforcing Officer any violations of the code. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Helm K. \j)QA.\\QJLt, 
Jilttd Alo660 

ViviLip Bonanno 

Ralph CoUello 

Donald H. Ha/iding 

CkaAlm> E. MUchzZl, RzAlgnzd 







59 



.V* 'JW,J* 





60 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1985 the Appeals Board conducted thirty-three hearings and made 
decisions on the following applications for variances, special permits and 
other appeals: 

GRANTED: Special Permit to build in the Flood Plain. 

Six Special Permits to work in the Watershed Protection District. 

Special Permit for carnival. 

Three variances from rear setback requirements. 

Four variances from front setback requirements. 

Two variances from side setback requirements. 

Variance from buffer requirement. 

DENIED: Special Permit for Cluster Development. 

Special Permit for working within the Watershed Protection District. 

Special Permit to allow construction trailer. 

Variance to allow a lot of insufficient size. 

Variance to allow a three-family on a lot of insufficient size and 
frontage. 

Variance to allow a two-family on a lot of insufficient size. 

Variance to allow a driveway for more than five cars within 150 
feet of an intersection. 

Appeal from action of Board of Selectmen for Earth Removal Permit. 

The applicants withdrew a request to change a two-family house to a 
three-family and a request for a special permit to work in wetlands. 

The Board of Appeals welcomes Associate Member Charles N. Peck, and 
the members of the Board look forward to working with him in the years ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RoboJdi F. Sylv<ta, Chairman 
BuAge-6-6 P. Stan.dl.zy, Member 
Ralph C. Good, 3n. , Member 
SandAa G. MunAZy, Associate 
WoJVty A. KzlZzhzA, Associate 
Cha/llzA W. Pzzk, Associate 

BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



61 



BICYCLE PATH COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Bicycle Path Committee was established in June 1983 by the Planning 
Board in response to concerns for safety and to seek available state and 
federal money for bike path construction. The Town's street map was re- 
viewed and a "Master Plan" showing approximately 10 to 12 miles of proposed 
bike paths was developed. One street, South Street Extension, was selected 
as the first priority and plans were developed showing a bike path along this 
street. However, it was discovered that a bike path would not adequately 
solve the many vehicular and pedestrian problems on that street. Further- 
more, due to the meandering of the street within the Town. 1 ' s layout, con- 
struction of a bike path would need crossings and could not be entirely 
compatible with the roadway widening proposed in 1955. 

In 1985, several members of the Bicycle Path Committee served on a new 
committee, the South Street Committee, to continue work for the improvements, 
not only of a bicycle path, but of an overall roadway reconstruction. Once 
improvements for South Street are agreed upon and approved, the Bicycle 
Path Committee will be ready to review the "Master Plan" and select a 
second priority. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VcuvldL VtvLtz&dhz, Chairman 
Gizg Bczdy 

GZ.0KQQ. &VlUH6 

RlchaAd VoSongheA 
WoxqoazX McLaugkttn 
Viand HcCullougk 
Jo6tph VankoA 
David Tmple. 



62 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Trustees of the Memorial Public Library is pleased to submit 
its report on the 1985 year. 

The Trustees thank Library Director, Jane Archer, and her staff for 
another year of fine programs, quality resource selection, and friendly 
service. Book circulation increased, as did use of the reading areas and 
meeting room. The new video cassette collection proved popular. The Library 
hosted a festival of George Inness prints. Cooperation with Medfield schools 
was emphasized and a monthly newsletter for users was started. 

The above was accomplished with responsible financial management within 
the limits of our approved budget. The Trustees thank the town for its 
support of a Town Meeting floor motion to sustain funding for book purchases. 
For our part, we have tried to properly maintain the facility and implement 
cost saving measures for energy and periodicals. 

We recognize with appreciation continued financial support of the Library 
by such groups as The Friends of The Library, Medfield Council on The Arts, 
local civic and business organizations, and individual citizen contributions. 

The ongoing and future needs and direction of the Library are being 
shaped by input from the townspeople through surveys conducted this year on 
the level of services, parking needs, and the role of the library in Medfield, 
as well as less formal conversations with Trustees and Library staff. 
Several priorities have been identified. 

We will strive to increase utilization of our Library through promotion 
of resources and programs, expanded hours, and examining parking needs. 

The needs of children demand our attention for quality and quantity of 
materials and supportive programs. 

Sustained and increased funding of adult materials is required to ad- 
dress our role as a popular adult reading facility and as an adult indepen- 
dent learning center. 

Lastly, we desire to leverage our resource base by using computers to 
access the collections of neighboring libraries. Our plan is to join the 
Minuteman Network of libraries in the greater Framingham/Wellesley area. 

We close by again thanking our supporters, patrons, and employees and 
look forward to serving you in 1986. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HldiazZ Hou)a/id, Chairman 
GlUchan Child* 
fAaxityn Connote 
VojOlLqJji KaLLio 
Elizabeth Ua/utin 
63 Satan VaAkoji 



THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The library continues to grow in both number of books owned and number 
of books borrowed. In 1985, circulation increased by over 3,000 from the 
previous year. The range of materials available to be borrowed also grew as 
video cassettes were added to the collection. At year's end 43 titles had 
been purchased thanks in large measure to a grant from Corning and special 
funding from Lawrie Rhoads of FDC Packaging Company. The video collection, 
which contains children's and adult classics and contemporary award winners, 
is extremely popular with the 43 titles circulating over 2,400 times during 
the year. 

It was discovered during the year that the collection also lost titles, 
as an inventory pinpointed 740 books that were missing. An appeal to the 
community brought back a small number, but the rest are still at large. Un- 
fortunately library theft is a common problem, and many towns have been 
forced to install electronic security devices. Our Trustees looked into the 
matter and feel that the expense is too great at this time. 

To help make up for these losses, many townspeople donated books or 
money to the library. Over $1,000 was contributed to the library's gift 
fund in 1985, and many new and used books were given to the library. For all 
this community support we again say thank you. 

An increase in the library's book budget was approved at Town Meeting to 
bring it more in line with per capita book expenditures in surrounding 
towns. Also, money for more staff time was approved so that additional 
assistance could be given to students after school. 

The meeting room continued to be heavily used throughout the year by 
community organizations and for library sponsored programs. Over 1,500 
people attended events that took place in this room. Library programs in- 
cluded lectures on how to start a mail order business, how acupuncture works, 
and how to build a coin collection or invest in rare coins. Classes spon- 
sored by the library included computer programming, work processing, cal- 
ligraphy, and parenting of preschoolers. A slide show of London and an after- 
noon of classical music also were enjoyed by many. A computer users group 
was formed by those who own a personal computer in order to share ideas and 
information. 

The library program which highlighted the year occurred in April with a 
celebration of George Inness, famous American landscape painter who lived in 
Medfield from 1859 to 1864. The celebration was planned to coincide with 
the opening of the Inness exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 
fork. Funding from the Medfield Council on the Arts made it possible 
to invite Nicolai Cikovsky, Jr., noted Inness authority and curator of 
American Art at the National Gallery in Washington, to give a lecture and 
slide presentation to an overflow crowd. The present owners of the Inness 
homestead, John and Jo-Anne Hooper, graciously opened their home so that 
townspeople could see where Inness had lived and painted. An exhibit of 
photographs of Medfield in the 1860's, assembled by Dot Aronson of the 

64 



Medfield Historical Society, was featured in the library's meeting room and 
contributed to the special event. 

The Friends of the Library continued to give active support to the 
library by sponsoring programs, underwriting the cost of museum passes and 
the rental collection, and by raising money for the library. Membership in 
the Friends almost doubled during the year as more townspeople made the com- 
mitment to a stronger library which can be shared by all. The annual used 
book sale remained a popular event and raised higher revenues than ever be- 
fore. Thanks must be extended to the many people who donated books for the 
sale, for without you it could not have been a success. Numerous programs 
sponsored by the Friends included how to trace your family tree, how to do 
cross-stitch embroidery, how to make cut and pierced lampshades, how to make 
a statice wreath and how to make a boxwood Christmas tree. For children, 
they sponsored a magic show, a Halloween make-up workshop, and a make-your- 
own Christmas ornament program. 

The Children's Room also experienced an increase in circulation during 
the year, as parents and young people continue to enjoy the pleasures of 
reading. Knowing that babies and young toddlers respond to works before they 
can speak, led to the development of a quality collection of sturdy board 
books and picture books to be read and shared with the very young. A shelf 
with books on parenting was also established thanks to a grant from New 'N 
Town. 

Children's Librarian, Connie Jones, continued to be an important liaison 
with the community at large as she helped Girl Scouts with reading projects, 
worked with the high school child development clsss, conducted visits of the 
library for various nursery schools and school classes, and provided infor- 
mation on day care programs in Medfield. 

Activities for children were held throughout the year beginning with 
Saturday afternoon movies in the winter, weekly Toddler Time Sessions during 
the spring and fall, and special summer events for preschoolers and school 
age children. Among the f unfilled sessions were making paper sculpture, de- 
signing your own board game and learning sign language, which was a big hit. 

As we look to 1986, it is important to note that significant changes 
are occurring in libraries which will greatly enhance their usefulness. 
Many libraries are entering the titles of all the books they own into a 
computerized database which can be accessed by a computer terminal at the 
home library. In our geographic area, 20 libraries have formed the Minute- 
man Library Network which has a database of close to a million titles. The 
Medfield Library has the opportunity to join the Network as a quasi-member 
which means that we would be able to access their database even though our 
collection would not be included in it. Anyone needing a book not owned in 
Medfield could immediately find out who does own it and if it is on the 
shelf or checked out. A relatively small sum of money will be requested at 
the 1986 annual Town Meeting to provide access to these million titles. 

In closing, there are so many people and organizations I wish I could 
publicly thank for the support they have given during the year. It has 
truly been overwhelming and without all of you the library would not be the 
wonderful community resource that it is. A most sincere thanks to each and 
every one of you. Also, my sincere appreciation is extended to the Library 
Trustees who provide leadership, guidance, and support and most especially 
to the library staff who make all of you feel so welcome when you come to 
the library. Every day, they are the ones who recommend interesting books 
and answer your questions. The entire community was deeply saddened when 

65 



. ^ur high school library aide, lost her life before Christmas. 
>Sb be a brighter year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane kuchzn., 

Library Director 



STATISTICS FOR 1985 



Total volumes owned 

Total materials circulated 

New books purchased 

New borrowers registered 



30,304 

75,601 

1,536 

970 




JAY SULLIVAN CHOOSING HIS LIBRARY SELECTIONS 



66 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL 
COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission submits herewith its thirteenth 
Annual Report for the calendar year 1985. 

The Medfield Historical Commission, appointed by the Board of Selectmen, 
is a legislated body mandated under state law. The primary duty of the 
Commission is to oversee the preservation, conservation, and restoration of 
all properties of historic significance. 

Activities of the Historical Commission included: 

1 . House Inventory Program 

This program continues to be an ongoing effort to create a detailed 
record of the historical properties in Medfield. The Commission maintains 
on file and continues to update this listing of historical properties. 

2 . The Historic Signs Program 

This program researches applications of individuals with historically 
significant property. Once verified, signs noting the original owner, the 
the date of the property, and often the original owner's occupations, are 
prepared on a cost basis for display on the outside of the property. This 
program has become quite popular with numerous individuals requesting ap- 
plications at the Commission's booth during Medfield Day. 

3. Historic Trail Brochure 



This Historic Trail Brochures continue to be available to the 
public. The brochure is a walking tour and guide to the architectural 
heritage of the town center. The brochure takes you from the 17th century 
English Yeoman style Peak House to the 19th century Queen Anne, Eliza Thayer 
block. It points out Colonial, Federal, Greek Revival, Victorian, and High 
Victorian Italianate style structures. Most of the properties are private 
residences and are not open to the public. Also, Sunday Services are still 
held in each of the churches on the tour. Copies of the brochure are avail- 
able free of charge at the Town House, the Memorial Public Library, and at 
the Commission's booth during Medfield Day. They are also used by classes 
in the Wheelock, Junior and Senior High Schools. 

4. Preservation Award Program 

Henrietta Maloney was awarded the 1985 Medfield Historic Preserva- 
tion Award, honoring her efforts for the continuing restoration and preser- 
vation of the 1888 Thayer-Monks Business Block, 479 Main Street, Medfield. 
The award was presented to Ms. Maloney at a Board of Selectmen's meeting. 



67 



I d- 
! rom 

■:ram 

ram on the History of Medfield continues 
Le to the public. The 150-slide presentation shows the 
■n 1649 to the present and is available to any in- 
inization in the town of Medfield. In addition, the 
;ram was shown at the Medfield Public Library this past year 

ing and was duplicated and donated to the Medfield Public School 
immission plans to present the program once again at the 

h istoric Preservation Reference Materials 

Through its membership in the National Historic Trust, the Commission 
is kept aware of all current publications in the field of historic preserv- 
tion. By special arrangement with the Medfield Memorial Public Library, all 

as of sample items received by the Commission are put on deposit with the 
Library and are available for use by the public. 

8. St. Edward's Park 

The Commission is actively involved in helping to determine the 
future of the old St. Edward's Church lot on Main Street, now vacant. The 
Commission would like to see the property transformed into an Historic Park 
which honors the center of town. 

9. New Historic Slide Program 

The Commission is preparing a slide program, "Medfield Connections- 
=ts-Musicians-Patronesses, 1860-1930", focusing on the prominent American 
artists of the Barbizon and Impressionist schools who painted under the 
guidance of George Inness when he lived in Medfield. Included will be 
artists and musicians who were summer residents of Mrs. Sewall's Boarding 
House on Main Street and the art academy on Spring Street. Any photographs 
for copy or information from townspeople concerning this program will be 
appreciated by the Commission. 

In Memoriam 



Laura Huntington Smith (1898-1985) 

Laura was a dedicated historian and the Commission's second chair- 
man. She spearheaded the reproduction and preservation program of the Town 
Is. She will be missed by all of us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. VzSolQk&i, Associate Member Robert M. ManJU.no, 3H. , Chmn, 
.^ociate Member Nancy Codibpoti, Secretary 

SoZva, Associate Member David L. Omn, Treasurer 

Elzanon. Aaei 
Donald J. McDonald 
Donna TeAzian 
Ann S. MentzeA 
68 



TRIBUTE TO 
LAURA HUNTINGTON SMITH 



Small in stature but a towering human being whose energy and personality 
touched and inspired many lives. 

Laura's family goes back to the earliest founders and her interest in 
the history of the Town of Medfield and as a curator and librarian for many 
years of the Historical Society, as well as a Charter member of the 
Historical Commission, is known to all. She was the proud descendant of such 
persons as the Reverend Daniel Sanders who was a past President of the 
University of Vermont and a former minister of this meeting house, as well 
as Walter Janes a founder of the straw manufacture business in town and for 
whom Janes Avenue was named. 

Laura could be found at the Society's headquarters sorting records or 
helping new members become familiar with the names and places that were her 

Medfield. 

The Annual Report for the year 1976 was dedicated to her in appreciation 
of her efforts on behalf of the many Town Boards on which she served. 

Even after she had retired from the teaching profession, she would still 
help any student — grammar, high school, college or other whenever called 
upon to assist in a history project; of course, correcting the grammar along 

the way. 

Dilligently pouring through old dusty books in the cellars of the Court 
House in Boston, she traced back early deeds, and in so doing helped get the 
Peak House on the National Register of Historic Places. While serving on the 
Historical Commission, she was the driving force behind such projects as the 
restoring and preserving of the burned early records of the town. Most im- 
portant was her part in the reprinting, in 1975, of W.S. Tilden's "History 
of Medfield", without which most of us would have hard put to become as 
familiar with the colorful and fascinating past that is Medfield. At the 
time there were only a few tattered and frayed original copies available and 
she recognized the importance of this volume as an accurate and detailed 
history and genealogical research book. She was obviously correct as it is 
now in its second printing and is being requested by researchers and is 
mailed to them to all parts of the country. 

Who can forget the welcoming smile, and of course, the blue hat perched 
firmly upon her head as she walked down Main Street, usually to the Town 
Hall, off again on another project. 

Laura, We love you, 

We respect you, 

We miss you, 

Be at rest. 

Ann S. MzntzeA, Medfield Historical Commission - Medfield Historical Society 

Written for the Memorial Service for Laura Smith at the First Parish 
Unitarian - Mav 2, 1985. 

69 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging consists of five members appointed by the 
Selectmen. The current council members who were appointed in August 1985, 
continue to be responsible to provide services to the approximate 1,200 
Medfield residents who have reached 60 years of age. We are assisted by two 
part-time salaried assistants, Executive Director, Harry T. Michell and 
driver of the MiniBus, Mrs. Millie Kennedy. Mr. Mitchell is available Monday 
through Friday at the Town House to answer questions about Council programs, 
and other related concerns such as, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, fuel 
assistance, etc. Mrs. Kennedy arranges and provides MiniBus transportation 
daily to the meal site, weekly to local and out-of-town shopping areas, and 
as needed for Council health and social programs. The Council is represented 
by two members on the Board of Directors of the King Philip Elder Services, 
Inc., area agency on aging. 

This past year 400 hot lunches have been served Monday through Friday at 
the First Baptist Church meal site, and home-delivered by volunteers. A 
potential increase in the number of home delivered meals (32 - 36 daily) is 
anticipated in view of shorter hospitalization for Medicare patients. This 
program also provides socialization for those who come to the meal site, and 
awareness of the physical condition of the homebound. 

A grant request for funding for a larger transportation van was sub- 
mitted and has been awarded to the Council. The "Friends of the Medfield 
Seniors, Inc." has generously donated additional funding for this project. 
A new van which has been purchased and will be available in the near future, 
will have ties for 2 wheelchairs and easy, convenient access for our senior 
population. Undoubtedly increased transportation needs in Medfield' s grow- 
ing senior population will have an impact on the Council's budget allocations. 

Other grants have allowed us to continue the arts and crafts program de- 
veloped and taught by Terri Roy at the First Baptist Church site. "HOPE", 
the monthly newsletter is mailed to 900 senior households, postage courtesy 
of the "Friends of Medfield Seniors, Inc.." A bi-monthly exercise program 
is available at the meal site. 

A new program which was introduced this year, made available counseling 
and discussion sessions of day-to-day problems concerning senior residents 
and their families. Under the sponsorship of the Cutler Center in Norwood 
this has been well received. 

A grant request has been submitted to provide funding for necessary 
renovations at the Pfaff Center to permit its use by Medfield Senior 
residents. The Council looks to the development of a single site for all 
Senior programs and social functions. 



70 



Our goal for the next year is to continue the existing successful pro- 
grams, and to introduce additional programs to include a larger senior pop- 
ulation. We most enthusiastically support the utilization of the Pfaff 
Center as a single site for all Medfield Senior functions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A/vtkuA L. TaAAOA, Chairman 

\KoA\j Downing, Secretary 

Ban Konbly 

HUAa. Uaadla 

Vfizd Temple., Treasurer 




DEDICATED HISTORIANS SEARCH THROUGH RUBBLE OF FORMER ST. EDWARD' s CHURCH 



71 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 
COORDINATOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following are just a few facts of what happens in or through the 
.:inator's Office. 

We have received a grant to replace our existing MiniBus during the next 
year. One of the best things about this new vehicle is that it will have 
more seating and easier access as well as tie downs for 2 wheelchairs. Of 
course the safety factor of a new vehicle and its parts are also an important 
feature. 

The past year the present vehicle made nearly 12,000 trips of varying 
degrees. That is a lot of stop's and go's. This grant will mean a savings 
to the town of approximately $35,000 with a sizeable amount of this being 
contributed through the efforts of our "Friends of Medfield Seniors, Inc." 
Most of their monies are raised by selling membership tickets each year for 
S2.00 to anyone that is interested. The Friends also pay for all the postage 
needed to mail our monthly newsletter, "HOPE", and most of our other mailings 
too. So you see it is important for everyone to be a "Friend." 

Another grant we received this year was to keep an arts and crafts 
program going and the Fit as a Fiddle Program also. These programs are small 
and only a part of what we try to do but they have a very important place in 
our attempt to look after the needs of our senior population. 

_ help set up and advertise clinics, meetings, lunches, transportation 
and any other needs our residents have a need for. We welcome all Senior 
Citizens who would be interested in having the lunches and joining in on the 
fellowhip of the club. Call the Town House for more information. 

Did you know that of the more than 10,000 residents in Medfield there 
are nearly 1,200 of them that are 60 years of age or older. Granted, most 
people from 60 to 70 do not need or want many of these services we provide, 
but we are here just in case. Just think of the impact seniors could have 
on elections, town meeting or any other event if they felt the need to join 
hands. Don't forget, most of you will be joining this elite group in the 
future. 

We never have enough volunteers throughout the year and yet it is sur- 
prising to know that you or your neighbors help us deliver food, hot lunches, 
medicine, provide trips to hospitals and doctors when our bus is unavailable, 
answer phones, make phone calls and visits and fold, staple, and address 
letters and much more. 

There is no way we can thank everyone by name but I do thank you for 
your time, your concern, your parties and your love for each other. That's 
what makes Medfield special. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hoaalj T. iMtcheJUl 

COORDINATOR 

72 



MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report 
for 1985. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is authorized by and operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, 
which is known as the Housing and Urban Renewal Law. The Authority is en- 
tirely funded through the Executive Office of Communities and Development of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; it does not receive any funds from the 
Town's appropriations. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is made up of five Commissioners, four of 
whom are elected for a five year term. Their terms are staggered so that 
only one Commissioner is elected each year. The fifth Commissioner is ap- 
pointed by the Governor for a five year term. 

The Authority is directed on a day-by-day basis by its Executive Director, 
Marie K. Roberts, P.H.M. John P. O'Toole is responsible for the physical as- 
pects of the Authority's property. The dedication of Mrs. Roberts and Mr. 
O'Toole is easily recognized by observing the well run and well maintained 
housing authority. 

The Commissioners and Director have attended workshops and conferences 
on housing needs throughout the year and will continue to do so in the future. 
Programs are continually being evaluated in order to determine their adapt- 
ability to the Town of Medfield. 

In 1985, the Executive Office of Communities and Development reviewed 
energy conservation data submitted by the Authority. Analysis revealed that 
there was a substantial reduction in over-all energy consumption due largely 
to tenant cooperation. A grant was awarded to the Authority to be used for 
the improvement of quality-of-lif e for the tenants. 

A full scope audit was conducted by the Office of the State Auditor for 
the period October 1, 1983 to September 30, 1985. The Authority is pleased 
to report that the Auditors found all accounts in order and no discrepancies 
were found. 

The Authority received with regret the resignation of William D. Walsh 
in October. It was gratifying that several Medfield residents expressed an 
interest in filling Mr. Walsh's unexpired term. In a joint election with 
the Selectmen, Mark O'Connor, Esquire, was appointed to the Authority. 

The Authority acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance 
of other Town Boards, local organizations and the support of the entire 
community. 

Questions pertaining to public housing may be directed to the Executive 
Director, Marie K. Roberts, P.H.M. at her office (359-6454) between 9:00 a.m. 

73 



and ru lys through Thursdays. The Medfield Housing Authority meets 

on the third luesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. in the office at 30 Pound 

The general public is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jam hi. KelZy, Chairman 

VqXqa A. Gainer, Vice-Chairman 

ZichaAd M. Vinton, Treasurer 

V-ianz H-iqktinqaJiz, Assistant Treasurer 

Ma/ik C. O'Connoi, Secretary 




MILL BROOK AT NEBO AND FOUNDRY STREETS 



Photo by Laila Kain 



74 



THE ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS 
COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Architectural Barriers Committee hereby submits its 
Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

The Committee has been meeting periodically through the year, following 
through on many of the projects, which were already in progress, such as the 
"curb-cut" project. 

They have continued to work with the School Department regarding handi- 
capped accessability problems. Bus-riding for children on crutches was dis- 
cussed. 

Merchants have been contacted and are cooperating with their handicapped 
parking spaces. 

The Medfield Building Inspector, Jack 0' Toole, was a guest at a meeting, 
and he discussed requirements with the Committee. 

The Architectural Barriers Committee was represented at a meeting of 
residents who were concerned with the future outcome of the St. Edward's 
property, and advised the group to be aware of any access problems for the 
handicapped. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CtVuAtsLe. Shoop, Chairman 
Rob&U L. Coufct&l, Vice Chairman 
BdVCAZy L. HoULoWoJLl, Secretary 
Paottne A. CouIXza 
Va.Yu.dL E. Hogan 
BKano 3. Palumbo 
ChafdLu H. RayneJi, 3k. 
tiichaeZ 3. SuZLLvan 



75 



THE CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. 131, Section 
40) and Medfield 's Wetlands By-Law the Conservation Commission performs a 
regulatory role as protector of the environment. This was a particularly 
active year as far as the number of public hearings was concerned. The 
hearings involved any persons proposing to fill, remove, dredge or otherwise 
alter land within 100 ft. of any wetland. These persons were required to 
file a Notice of Determination or Intent to the Commission. The following 
public hearings were held in 1985: 



1. Ronald Tocci/Mark F. Dorfman 

Doe Acres, residential dwellings, Farm St. 

2. Wendy J. Pruell 

Construction of a recreational pond, High St 

3. Calvin W. Colwell, Hoover Realty Trust 
Residential dwelling, Elm St. 

4. Paul C. Lauenstein, MPM Realty Trust 
Enlargement of existing building, West St. 

5. John McCormick 

Residential dwelling, Grace Dr. 

6. Ralph Costello 
Residential dwelling, High St. 

7. Michael Marhol in /Howard Grayson, Medfield 
Associates, Castle Estates 

Sewer line, North St. 

8. Michael Marholin/Howard Grayson, Medfield 
Associates, Castle Estates 

Drainage system, North St. 

9. Peter Fickeisen, West Mill Realty Trust 
Residential condominiums, West Mill St. 

10. George Yered/Robert Keleher 
Construction of warehouse, West Mill St. 

11. John H. Rosata, Custom Concepts, Inc. 
Residential dwelling, Pine St. 



Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 

Approved with conditions 

Approved with conditions 

Approved with conditions 

Approved with conditions 

Approved with conditions 



12. Ralph Costello 

Residential dwellings, Plain St. & Briar Hill Rd . 

Conservation land may be acquired by the town as a tax deductible gift. 

76 



sale or easement. Residents are encouraged to keep this in mind and contact 
the Commission for further information. This year the town received a gift 
of 2^5 acres of land from Mr. John Lewis of North St. and his two sisters. 
This gift was able to provide a connection of a large tract of conservation 
land and one held in private trust creating a "green belt" area. 

The town along with the Trustees of Reservations owns 477 acres of land 
on Noon Hill. We are in the process of developing a land management program 
with the Trustees in order to generate income and to make the land more 
accessible as a passively recreational resource for the general public. Dur- 
ing the summer the Highway Department under the authority of Ken Feeney was 
instrumental in reconstructing the Holt's Pond dam. The dam had been in a 
precarious state with multiple leaks and the threat of a major flood. 

We regretfully accepted the resignation of John Bradstreet. John pro- 
vided many years of valuable service and will always be remembered by those 
who had the privilege of being a Commission member along with him. Also 
joining the Commission this past year was Jesse Matuson and Stephen Bassett 
as associate members. Other changes were as follows: David Morrish and 
Robert Kinsman became full members from associate member status, and Edmund 
Hammond and Richard Bryant became associate members from full member status. 
Jesse Matuson was appointed as a committee member to the Bay Circuit Green- 
belt Project. 

Another activity during the year was a Norfolk County Conservation Dis- 
trict meeting at the Medfield Town House. Dick Lewis, Chairman, officiated 
at the meeting. Dave Blackmar and Dick Emmet presented their topic: "Tools 
for Groundwater Protection" and were well received by members from Medfield, 
Millis and Dover conservation commissions; Millis Groundwater Protection 
Committee, Medfield Hazardous Waste Commissioner and guests. 

Any interested Medfield resident is cordially invited to attend the 
monthly meetings of the Conservation Commission at the Town House, the first 
Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. Any resident wishing to join the Com- 
mission is invited to contact us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lee HaoelZ, Chairman 
BVinaAd MonbouqueJXn, Vice Chairman 
BeXty A. KaeAW2A, Secretary 
VciVJJd WohXlbh, Treasurer 
Vouglcu> Campbell- 
John GuZfovLz 
Robojvt Kinsman 

JoJshl L. McutuAOVl, Associate Member 
John Bea£e, Associate Member 
Stephen E. Bai,i>oJX, Associate Member 
Edmund Hammond, Associate Member 
Hani, on C. Robb^m, Associate Member 
RicJlOAd W. Bryant, Associate Member 



77 



HAZARDOUS WASTE 
COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Hazardous Waste Committee spent nearly all its time in 1985 examin- 
ing proposals for a bylaw regulating buried fuel tanks. There is great con- 
cern that leaks from these tanks might contaminate the town's water supplies. 
as has already happened in some of the neighboring towns. 

Initially we concentrated on gas stations as the greatest probable 
problem area. But as we have learned more about underground storage, most of 
the concern, and debate, has been about the other buried tanks in town — 
those owned by businesses, industrial companies, home owners, schools, and 
the town itself. There is an alarmingly high probability that these tanks 
will leak after 15 to 20 years of age. The large oil companies already have 
good programs, and the resources, to monitor the leak tightness of the tanks 
they own. The vast majority of the other tanks in town are not monitored at 
all; their owners may not even know how old they are! 

From what we have learned, the best way to monitor these tanks is to 
keep very detailed inventory records of the quantities of material going in- 
to and out of the tanks. Such inventory records are not practical for tanks 
connected to burners, however, a second monitoring method is to period- 
ically test the tanks for leak tightness. The method of performing this 
test is not very simple, air pressure cannot be used and tank expansion and 
temperature changes have to be accounted for. Therefore, the test is ex- 
pensive, $400 or more for a single tank. We have been unable to find other, 
cheaper, methods to monitor buried tanks. 

The bylaw we are proposing for the 1986 Town Meeting has the following 
basic features: 

- Registration of all buried tanks, regardless of size. 

- Construction and installation requirements for new tanks. 

- Inventory record control for tanks containing automotive fuel or 
waste oil. 

- Periodic tightness testing of all buried tanks. 

- Removal of all tanks 20 years old or older. 

- Administration by the Board of Health and the Fire Chief. 

The proposed bylaw is essentially the same as one written by the 
Conservation Law Foundation. 

We look forward to presenting this proposed bylaw. And we hope that 
the town will agree with us that the cost of implementing it will be more 
than outweighed by the protection it will afford our very valuable water 
resources. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vav-id B-ivotcA-C RobeAJi Janock, Chairman 
EdUh Bea£e Je^-ie MatuAon, Vonald SzngeA 
78 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year 1985 again showed continued growth in the work load 
for the Board of Health agents, staff members and our contracting agencies. 
Growth was especially noted in the areas of on-site sewage disposal instal- 
lations due to the need for a great deal of professional expertise in the 
planning and review of proposed septic systems. Our agents and staff found 
themselves spending more time supplying information and on consultation 
services as well as the continuing expansion of the outreach program's re- 
ferral and counselling services. 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH - Sanitation 



Due to new regulations promulgated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Health Agent John Keefe's duties were expanded in 1985. The Massachusetts 
Food Establishment Regulations became effective October 1, 1985. These 
regulations were designed to improve food safety by requiring good food 
handling practices in restaurants and supermarkets. All food service es- 
tablishments and retail food stores located in Massachusetts are covered by 
these regulations. Mr. Keefe has provided education to all Medfield 
facilities including the schools relative to these new regulations. In add- 
ition, Mr. Keefe is required to enforce new state requirements for all re- 
tailers to notify customers of saccharin content in foods for sale. 

As agent for the Board of Health, Agent John Keefe made 126 inspections 
of food service establishments and retail food stores and gave consultation 
and advice to 40 requests and investigated 10 food related complaints. All 
establishments are inspected at least quarterly. As in past years, while 
most establishments maintain their operation within the guidelines of the 
new state regulations, it continues to be necessary in some cases for the 
Board to request representatives of some to appear before the Board for re- 
view of re-occurring non-compliance problems. Various consultations were 
also held with school, highway and fire personnel and administrators as well 
as with State Public Health officials. 

Under the provisions of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code covering 
minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe made inspections of 6 
dwelling units during the year which included random inspections of rental 
housing and inspections resulting from complaints and observations by other 
town inspectors in the course of their work. There were 3 housing violation 
complaints investigated and where violations of the State Sanitary Code were 
found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective action and follow- 
up inspections were made to assure compliance. Mr. Keefe also made 116 mis- 
cellaneous inspections which included the public bathing beach, semi-public 
pools, laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers and the landfill. Twelve 
regular inspections of school cafeterias and 8 inspections of nursery schools 
were carried out thru the year. Total inspections and consultations during 
1985 were 326. 



79 



ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER ! 

The town has experienced another year of growth and expansion. As the 
nutn K row, the load on our environment increases. The Board 

has b( ve and in cooperation with other Boards and Committees, has 

for proper management of our natural resources, particularly 
the protection of our water resources. In doing so, with support from our 
consulting engineer, William Domey and the state DEQE, the Board provided 
. cring assistance to the town residents and reviewed plans for future 
pment. The following is a list of some of the results of the Board of 
Health's efforts to serve the town. 

New plans reviewed 29 

Site plan approvals 5 

Approved designs 19 

On site soil tests 65 

Septic system construction 24 

Construction inspections 84 

Repair permits 9 

Well water systems 1 

Installers' permits 15 

Septage handler permits 20 
Swimming pool review 



L9 



Sewerage complaints were reviewed and investigations were conducted 
throughout the year. Approximately 120 site visits, 47 conferences and 
numerous hearings were held to respond to the 510 requests for service during 
the year. 

In addition, the Board reviewed and supported the efforts of the 
Hazardous Waste Committee to produce a meaningful Hazardous Waste Bylaw. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Karen MacGregor continues her dedicated service as Animal Inspector and 
the Board of Health gratefully acknowledges her very capable assistance in 
that position. Her report is contained separately in this Town Report. The 
Board would like to remind residents that a permit issued annually by the 
Board of Health is required for the keeping of any animals other than house- 
hold pets. Residents are also reminded that all animal bites or scratches 
must be reported immediately to the animal inspector or the Board of Health 
of the town in which the bite occurs so that the animal may be quarantined 
or if necessary, arrangements made for laboratory examination. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 

Restaurants, counter bars and cafeteria food service 14 

Food stores and markets 13 

Temporary food service permits 7 

Catering permits 1 

Mobile food service/ice cream vendors 

Milk licenses - vehicles and stores 

Bakeries 2 

Laundromats 2 

Funeral directors 1 

Horse, animal, farm and stable permits 19 

Veterinary clinics 1 

Refuse and offal carters permits 4 
Wood alcohol permits 



Total permits issued including disposal works construction, wells, 
installers, repairs and septage handlers 128 

The total revenue from the issuance of permits and the fees for the re- 
view of plans was $6,012 for the calendar year 1985 compared to $6,330 for 
1984. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens, Inc. has 
established a longstanding partnership with the Town of Medfield which has 
been the vital link in establishing and maintaining a basic, necessary system 
of services for people who are handicapped. The present wide range of pro- 
grams serving Medfield includes such as Early Intervention for newborn 
babies and infants up to the age of three. A team of therapists serve the 
families in home-based and center-based developmental and therapeutic inter- 
vention. Citizens of town participate in day programs with prevocational 
and vocational training where they learn to maximize their skills and become 
more self-sufficient, perhaps some day to become totally independent of the 
need for services. Some families have been unable to care for their handi- 
capped child as they become older and SNCARC, through its established pro- 
gram of residences and apartments, has been able to satisfy the necessary 
habilitational needs, providing a home and security for the future. 

SNCARC' s resources extend to other areas such as counseling, respite 
care and social and recreational programs. 

SNCAB I 1985 Service Report 

Progra m Clients Served 

Day Habilitation Program 

(serving the most severely handicapped adults) 4 

Vocational Training Services 

(Norfolk Industrial Services) 6 

Early T vcervention Program 
(infants birth to age 3) 

(infants) 5 

(families) 5 

Residential Care Program 3 

Family 3 pport /Rehabilitative 

Therapies/Clinical Services 10 

Respit: C are/Emergency Services 7 

Social- r -e^r eat ional /Transport at ion/ 

Citizen Advocacy Services 10 

Ncrrolk Mental Health Association provides services to the Toxcn of 
Medfield which include vocational rehabilitation and sheltered employment 
for the handicapped , volunteer case-aide and parent aide services to in- 
dividuf who are experiencing especially high levels of stress, crisis or 
needs for one-to-one support, a large and very beneficial Widowed Lifeline 
program, an Intergenerational Care Program bringing young children together 
with ill elderly people in a nursing home, a preventative educational pro- 
gram on parenting called the Parent/lnfant/Toddler Program, and a small res- 
idents ' program for deinstitutions.lized adults who have both chronic mental 
illnesf .nd mental retardation. 

I ;he first seven months of this fiscal year (Town of Medfield funding 
for these services reinstated 7/1/85) Cutler Counseling Center provided 526 



hours . idividuals from Medfield. In addition, Medfield is 

being with 80 "free" consultation hours for the Council on Aging. 

edica, Director of Cutler's Services to the Elderly, has been 
meeting with Harry Mitchell, Medfield' s Elderly Coordinator, and has been 
lead. up of older residents of the town to give them support and 
help them socialize and learn more about available community resources. 

PfBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association, Medfield 's public health 
nursing supplier, increased its home health services in Medfield by 8% in 
1985. In particular, home health aide services increased due to an in- 
creased need for personal care by 12% over 1984. The agency's other 
services: skilled nursing; physical, occupational and speech therapies; and 
medical social workers continue to be available for Medfield residents. 

The above services are usually reimbursed by third party payments such 
as Medicare, Medicaid and private health insurance. However, in 1985, 
Medicare's reinterpretation of regulations substantially affected the eligi- 
bility of individuals receiving services under Medicare. In 1985, the 
Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association provided almost $6,000 in free and 
reduced fee care to residents of Medfield, who in most cases could not be 
covered under Medicare. The Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association will 
continue to provide these services to all Medfield residents regardless of 
their ability to pay. 

Our Public Health Program, which the town supports, is an important 
part of our total organization. Health Promotion visits to the chronically 
ill and the elderly are vital in helping to maintain these persons in their 
homes. In addition, the Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association provides 
appropriate followup for certain communicable diseases as mandated by the 
Massachusetts Department of Health. 

People who are not seen in the home, receive services at our clinics. 
A major component of our clinic services are the monthly Senior Citizen 
Health Clinics which are still held on the first Tuesday at Wilkins Glen 
and the third Tuesday of each month at Tilden Village. During these clinics, 
a well-rounded program of health education is supplemented by blood pressure 
and weight monitoring as well as personalized diet and medication counseling. 
These services are also available during office hours at the Walpole office 
on Monday, Tuesday and Friday mornings between 9 A.M. and 10 A.M. at the 
Blackburn Hall in Walpole. 

The flu clinic was well attended again this year. In addition to our 
screening programs for diabetes, and hypertension, we added a colorectal 
cancer screening program to better serve Medfield residents. 

While our Maternal-Child Health program continues to provide visits to 
newborns and their families, our inexpensive classes have grown substantially 
due to our personalized appoach. A new service that we are providing to 
supplement this program is an infant car seat rental service for assisting 
all individuals with the transporting of infants. This service started in 
December through a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

As we begin a new year of service, we would like to thank those local 
physicians and community organizations who worked closely with our agency in 
1985. Most of all we appreciate the support and sensitivity of Medfield 's 
town officials who assist us in our efforts to better serve the residents. 

82 



Statistics for 1985 with year to year comparison: 

CLINICS 1984 Sessions Patients 1985 Sessions Patients 

Senior Citizen Health Clinic 

Hypertension 

Flu (does not include home visits) 

Colorectal Screening 





14 


443 


24 


464 




2 


226 


1 


169 





1 


144 


1 
1 


134 

5 



IN HOME SERVICES 



17 813 27 -. 772-5% 



1984 1985 



Health Promotion Visits 298 288 

Nursing Visits 1237 1224 

Physical Therapy visits 481 486 

Speech Therapy Visits 10 13 

Occupational Therapy visits 1 66 

Medical Social Service visits 7 6 

Home Health Aide Visits 2440 2739 

4474 4822 + 8% 

FREE CARE $4,000 $5,985 

YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAM 

The Medfield Outreach Program continues to be a position supported by 
the town and administered by the Board of Health and the Outreach Advisory 
Committee. The Outreach Advisory Committee, which consists of Diana Sandgren : 
Virginia Cusack (citizens at large) , Lois Cardell (school nurse) , William 
Mann (Police Chief) , Carol Nye (Board of Health liaison) , and Lois Lambert 
(Director of Pupil Services) continues to meet every four to six weeks in 
the Outreach Office. They review and evaluate the Youth Outreach activities 
and take recommendations to the Board of Health for improving or expanding 
the program as well as providing guidelines for administrative action rela- 
tive to the program. 

The focus of the position has traditionally been, and remains, crisis 
intervention, short and some long term counseling, information and referrals, 
community and client liaison and advocacy. These confidential services are 
offered free of charge to Medfield youth and their families by the Outreach 
Worker, Nancy Acker-Wolf hagen, who has been providing services since her 
hiring in January 1985. 

OUTREACH STATISTICS 



For the year starting January 1985 and ending December 1985, a total of 
96 clients were serviced by the Outreach Worker. Of these, 38% were repeat 
visits with 60% making more than 5 visits to the office and several who re- 
tained longer term relationships of 30 meetings or more. 

These persons received services in the following areas: 

Family related issues 52 

Sexual abuse 3 

Information 17 

Referrals 24 

Alcohol related issues 12 

Other drug related issues 6 

Physical abuse 6 

83 



I u ing issues 8 

related issues 1 

1 

i ity 9 

Work related issues 3 

Depression 10 

• ■rce 12 

Pregnancy 5 

Peer related issues 25 

Diversion 1 

Rent-a-Kid 14 

Emergency housing 9 

Crisis Intervention 29 

In over 50% of the cases, parents and other family members were involved 
in the counseling process. Clients were referred to the Outreach Worker by 
the school (25%) , self referral (55%) , with the remaining 20% being referred 
by other sources such as Juvenile Diversion, local physicians, local ministers, 
state agencies, private counseling agencies and local clubs and groups. 

Committees and Groups The Outreach Worker participates in a number of groups 
on a regular basis including: the Youth Advisory Committee, the Salvation 
Army Advisory Board, the superintendent's Alcohol and Drug Task Force, a 
weekly mental health professionals' resource group, and monthly meetings of 
the Massachusetts Municipal Human Service Workers Association. Nancy also 
aided the Medfield Hunger Action Committee by housing their food pantry in 
her office. 

This fall the Rent-a-Kid program was extended to a full year program out 
of the Outreach Office. At the end of the year there were 21 students regis- 
tered with the program, a number of whom have had several jobs in the 
community. 

School Outreach The Outreach Worker continues to meet with school personnel 
on a regular basis, which includes administrators, school psychologists, 
guidance staff and some teachers at the Middle School, High School and two 
elementary schools. She had the opportunity- to meet and talk with all sixth, 
seventh and ninth grade classes and several of the eleventh grade classes. 
Topics included such as Decisionmaking, Responsible behavior, Substance use 
and abuse. Nancy also has participated in the Students Against Driving Drunk 
chapter at the High School including attendance at a day long resource ex- 
change in Newton. 

Community Outreach The Outreach Worker meets with the police, Juvenile Di- 
version, church staff, Board of Selectmen, outside agencies such as private 
practitioners, doctors, Screening and Emergency Team, Department of Social 
Services, hospitals, etc. to coordinate services and for public awareness of 
the Outreach program. Nancy also held an Open House for the community in 
April and spoke on parenting issues at a meeting of the Divorced and Separated 
group in Medfield. 

Educational Advancement and Supervision Nancy participated in a two-day 
training program sponsored by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training 
Council on rape victimology for the crisis worker and attended an all day 
conference at U. Mass Medical Center on working with families of school-age 
children. 

has maintained a weekly clinical supervisory relationship with 
Alex Ringelheim, MSW of Needham Family Services. She also has been meeting 

84 



bi-weekly with Mark Blogier, MSW of Needham Family Services about clinical 
issues of younger clients. Supervision assures Medfield clients in the 
Outreach program the very best in services. 

The Board of Health would like to take this opportunity to thank its 
agents, staff and Advisory Committee members for their dedicated service. 

The Board normally holds its meetings on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of 
each month at the Town Hall. These meetings are open to the public and 
citizens are invited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wexc V. MacKznzZt, Chairman 
EdwaJid J. Toomzy, Clerk 
CoaoI A. HljQ. 




3? 





85 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

he Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I respectfully submit the report of the Cemetery Department for the 
year ending 1985. 

I feel so much has been accomplished this past year. With the generous 
assistance of the Highway Department personnel all the avenues have been re- 
surfaced and or sealed. This will keep our avenues in shape tc* several 
years without major road work. 

Work on our newest section, B-3, has been accomplished with little im- 
pact on our budget, since all the development has been with the support of 
the many town departments, more specifically, the Highway Department. The 
expertise of the county engineers has been enlisted to help with the survey- 
ing and plotting this new section. It is hoped this will be ready for use 
by spring of 1986. 

In addition to replacing the "household" type riding lawn mower with a 
commercial machine, I have borrowed a second commercial lawn mower until 
next year when we will have funds to purchase our own. There has been so 
much growth in our developed lands that it is necessary to have two com- 
mercial rider mowers in service, in addition to the hand powered mowers. 

There was so much damage caused by the hurricane this past September 
that without the support and help of our new Tree Warden and his department 
we would have been cleaning up (and climbing up) until 1996. 

Keep in mind the need for expansion of your cemetery ,, I feel there is 
no immediate concern, but, if you decide to wait much longer, there will be 
a serious problem. 

Again, I wish to thank all the town departments for their unselfish 
support. Without their help we would not have accomplished so much with so 
little. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Tnacy MUcheJU 
Superintendent 



86 



THE PARK AND RECREATION 
COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Commission in 1985 completed the restoration of the old Youth 
Center with the assistance of the labor provided by the Medfield Prison 
Project and over $12,000 of donated funds, and furnishings from local civic 
and business organizations. The building was rededicated in November 1985 
as the Hannah Adams Pfaff Community Center. The Commission negotiated a 
contract with the Charles River Y.M.C.A. to provide the cost to heat the 
facilities in exchange for usage of the Pfaff Center. The Y.M.C.A., 
sponsored by the Commission provides a summer day camp, before and after day 
care center, exercise and aerobic classes for the community. 

The Commission convened a meeting of all civic, sports and business 
organizations to act as a Board of Directors to study the utilization and 
future planning and to develop the Pfaff Center into a community center 
serving all organizations in the community. 

The Commission established a special committee of all sports organiza- 
tions (Little League, Babe Ruth League, American Legion baseball, Youth 
Soccer, Girls Softball, Men's Softball, Men over the-hill Softball, the 
Chairman of the Commission, Superintendent of Schools and Athletic Director 
to help improve the quality of the playing fields in the community. As a 
result the 56 acre ballfields were redesigned to accommodate the Men's Soft- 
ball Leagues, and two new soccer fields were developed behind the Wheelock 
School. In addition, the Dale Street Memorial School fields were replanted, 
soded and restored to make 1-2 new soccer fields, and 1 regulation Little 
League Field. This committee will meet on a regular basis to help plan 
future improvements and to better coordinate the scheduling and usage of the 
playing fields, both Park and school. 

The Youth Activities Coordinator was extremely active, running several 
dances, bus trips, days at the beach in the summer, and a Halloween Party. 
Perhaps the leading one of his activities is the establishment of a drop-in 
restaurant of the Pfaff Center on Saturday nights for High School students. 
This restaurant provides a place for teenagers to watch sports events, video 
music in an informal atmosphere, and to socialize with their peers in an in- 
formal setting. 

The Commission is also taking steps to develop the Hinkley swimpond 
into an outdoor recreational facility with the help of CETA workers, 
prisoners from the Medfield Prison Project and private contributions. The 
brush areas will be cleared and picnic tables and grills will provide an area 
for groups and individuals to enjoy in the spring, summer and fall months. 

The many other sponsored or supported programs of the commission were 
all highly successful; 

(a) The swimpond 

(b) Medfield Youth Bowling 

(c) Learn to ski 

(d) Little League baseball 

87 




COMMUNITY CENTER IS OFFICIALLY NAMED HANNAH ADAMS PFAFF COMMUNITY CENTER 




PAMELA JONES, REPRESENTING MEDFIELD YOUTH HOCKEY ASSOCATION, 
GAVE JACK HELLER, PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSIONER, WELL EARNED 
. ITION FOP. i J IS DEDICATION TO THE YOUTH 



88 



(e) Babe Ruth baseball 

(f) American Legion Baseball 

(g) Youth soccer 

(h) Summer baseball; Tri Valley League; Lou Gerhig League; Southeastern 

Mass. League 

(i) Tennis programs and instruction 

(j) Volleyball Youth and Adult 

(k) Youth basketball 

(1) Men's Softball 

(m) Miniature boat racing at Hinkley Park. 

The Commission provided an alternative to the closing of skating at Rocky 
Woods, by making an arrangement with "Country Skating" in Walpole to provide 
winter skating and lessons for the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Rob&Ut W. MUUL2A, Chairman 

WWUam "Jack" WtJULVl, Vice Chairman 

and Clerk 
SandAR Vitdh, Secretary 
MaAy G-LULlA , Commissioner 
ChJjp LznnOYl, Commissioner 
E/W.C 0'oVu.e.tt, Associate Commissioner 



CHAIRMAN ROBERT MILLER OF PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION RECOGNIZES MEDFIELD 
LIONS CLUB'S CONTRIBUTION TO YOUTH, JOHN MC CORMACK REPRESENTING MEDFIELD LIONS 




CHAIRMAN ROBERT MILLER OF PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION PRESENTS PLAQUE TO 
BLANCHE MILLARD OF MEDFIELD SENIORS 



89 



THE MEDFIELD PRISON PROJECT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Prison Project originated in 1971 following enabling legis- 
lation, under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 127, Section 49A and 
Section 49B, which authorized the establishment of state school/hospital 
programs. Located on the grounds of the Medfield State Hospital, the pro- 
gram commenced in 1971 as the Medf ield-Norfolk Prison Project. During this 
phase of the program, inmates from MCI-Norfolk were transported daily to the 
hospital to work on the wards, providing direct patient care. 

On May 9, 1976 the program became a residential program with a maximum 
capacity of thirty-six (36) inmates. As such, it became a unique hospital 
program fully integrating the operations of a minimum security correctional 
facility and a state school/hospital program. Despite its uniqueness, the 
Medfield Prison Project is part of a larger network of hospital programs 
aimed at meeting the critical needs of both Corrections and the fields of 
public and mental health. 

Medfield Prison Project utilizes carefully screened inmates from other 
correctional institutions to provide direct patient care and other vital 
services to mentally ill, retarded, aged, infirm and otherwise disadvantaged 
residents. Program participants must be approved via the Department of 
Correction Classification process before undergoing a final interview by a 
hospital screening committee composed of representatives from the Medfield 
Prison Project, Medfield State Hospital and the local Medfield community. 
Eligibility criteria restricts participation to those inmates who are not 
currently serving a sentence for a sex, arson or drug offense. However, 
six (6) lifer slots are available. 

Medfield State Hospital has about two hundred and fifty (250) mentally 
ill and emotionally disturbed patients. It offers full psychiatric diag- 
nostic care and treatment services on both an in-patient and out-patient 
basis. Medfield inmates work a minimum of forty (40) hours per-week in 
assignments throughout the hospital. Assignments vary to some extent, but 
there is an emphasis on providing direct care services to Medfield patients. 
Since most patients are mobile and able to function at a relatively high 
level, inmate assistance is utilized heavily in providing supervision of 
daily living, social, and recreational activities. Program participants 
may also be assigned to work on more specialized group and individual pro- 
grams through the Occupational Therapy Department. While the emphasis is 
on providing direct patient services, an effort is made to utilize as fully 
as possible any special skills an inmate brings to the program in order to 
meet an existing need at the hospital. In addition to regular weekly work 
responsibilities many Medfield inmates are periodically involved in running 
special weekend recreational programs on hospital grounds for retarded 
youngsters from the surrounding community. 

Participating inmates are offered a unique humanizing work experience, 
a variety of training and educational opportunities, and post-release em- 
ployment possibilities. Performing duties comparable to those of mental 

90 



health aides, they work under the direct supervision of mental health pro- 
fessionals and other supervisory personnel. 

The Medfield Prison Project hospital program provides a transition phase 
between more standard incarceration and pre-release; provides valuable assis- 
tance to the Department of Mental Health in the execution of its respons- 
ibilities; and provides the inmate population with a valuable introductory 
work experience in the human service field with additional opportunities for 
further education, training and employment. 

This past year Medfield has benefited, as many other state communities 
have in the past, by allowing prisoners to work on civic projects. Much has 
been accomplished in town with the use of this free labor. Close to 1,800 
hours have been devoted to projects around town, such as: Town Pond - High- 
way Department - Town Garage - Community Center - Church Sidewalk - Schools 
and Library. 

Early in December the Medfield Prison Project successfully achieved 
accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation, which indicates that the 
prison is in compliance with the highest standards nationally. We join select 
company, for less than 20% of the nation's prisons have received this 
accreditation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

khXkuA L. Voaaoa 

MEDFIELD PRISON PROJECT COMMITTEE 




91 



THE YOUTH ADVISORY 
COMMISSION 



To che Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Commission's goals this year are a continuation of last year's. 
The students are working hard on the SADD (Students against Drunk Driving) 
Program. 

We have a new project this year. Walpole is offering a Family Awareness 
program which helps teenagers who are troubled and need to confide in an 
adult. A hot-line is available to them. 

Some of the commission are helping in the success of the new Night Spot 
at the Pfaff Center every Saturday night. They are also working closely 
with the Student Council and School Committee to make them aware of any 
school related problems. 

The Youth Recreational Booklet review progress is underway also. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Waxy V. Glttib 
Nancy kdzoA-bJol&kago-n 
Hick kn.ovibtQA.vi 
Voaibo Banton 
kndJio.a. Bn.ockolman 
JuJUc Bunko 
Ltba Cabildy 
Gay V'kman.0 
Joo VlG-iovanvu. 
Enlc VoucoJXo. 
BanZ GawLbon 
John w. HoJULoa 
Thomab LaPlanto 
VatAtcta Loo. 
J+jm Loo viand 
3oii Low-Lb 
Sally MacVonald 
Hold! MacKinnon 
Molly ULneJi 
BanbaAa Ruzzo 
\Jlnnlc SvU-pab 
CknMb SiAJo.zoy 
Vcnlk ThoAlaulX 
Rob Wallace 



92 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered Medfield 
Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services for the period ending December 31, 1985. The state reimburses the 
town seventy-five percent of the benefits. 

This assistance includes fuel, clothing, food, housing and medical ex- 
penses for Veterans and their families. 

VETERANS' SERVICES 



Hospitalization 1 

Education 5 

Burial Allowance 12 

Social Security 19 

Pension Assistance 33 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 19 
Benefits Administered 10 

I wish to thank town officials for their assistance during the year, 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. CuAAan 
Veterans' Agent 



93 




r' \M 



COMMANDER EDWARD FRALEN OF BECKWITH POST AMERICAN LEGION SALUTES THE VIETNAM VETERANS 

Photo by Lai la Kain 



94 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

Inspections of instruments of weights and measures were performed by 
this Department. Bark and wood regulations were followed by inspecting wood 
and spot checking advertisements. There were a total of 147 final inspections 

The following were sealed by the Sealer. 

BALANCES AND SCALES : 

2 Devices over 10,000 lbs.; 

23 between 10 lbs. and 100 lbs.; 

5 scales of 10 lbs. or less, for a total of 25 Balances and Scales 
sealed. 

WEIGHTS : 

10 Avoirdupois and 48 Apothecary weights were sealed for a total of 
58. 

LIQUID MEASURING METERS : 

3 grease devices and 54 gasoline pumps were sealed for a total of 
57. 

LINEAR MEASUREMENT : 

4 were sealed. 

Total of charges for Inspections of the Sealer for 1985 were $1,235.20. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VouUvica.ol A. Zioux 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



95 



BUILDING 


241 


221 


955 


786 


PLUMBING 


173 


157 


136 


182 


GAS 


116 


120 


169 


153 


WIRING 


267 


243 


532 


530 



THE INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 1985: 

DEPARTMENT PERMITS INSPECTIONS INCOME EXPENSES 
1985 (1984) 1985 (1984) 1985 1984 1985 1984 

$35,880 $20,665 $11,794 $9,547 

5,671 3,708 1,904 2,520 

1,729 1,592 2,325 2,083 

9,125 6,330 7,116 4,043 

The total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections 
for the calendar year 1985 was $52,405 as compared to $32,295 for 1984. 
Expenses for 1985 amounted to 23,139 as compared to $18,193 for 1984. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is 

New Single family dwellings 
Additions to private dwellings 
Renovations to private dwellings 
Additions to business buildings 
Renovations to business buildings 
New Industrial/business buildings 
Reshingling roofs & installation of 

new sidewalls 
Private swimming pools 
Accessory buildings 
Residential garages 
Demolitions 
Tents (temporary) 
Signs 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 
Solar 

Stables and barns 

Multi-family dwellings (1-7 unit & 1-14 unit) 
Carnival 

Temporary trailer 
Foundation 



Occupancy certificates were issued for 39 new residences in 1985 as 
compared to 59 in 1984. 

Inspections for certification of businesses, nursery schools and multi- 
family residences amounted to 40 inspections for 1985. 

96 



listed below: 




1985 
42 


1984 

43 


70 


49 


24 


27 


4 


4 


3 


6 


4 


3 


12 


9 


19 


19 


5 


2 


2 


3 


5 


3 


4 


2 


5 


1 


38 


41 


2 


5 








4 unit) 2 


1 





1 





1 




TOTAL 241 


1 
221 



Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 1985 

New dwellings $6,452,000 
Renovations & additions, pools, shingling 

sidewalls etc. on residential 1,460,803 1,004,193 

New construction business and industry 5,000,000 450,000 
Renovations & additions business 

& industry 421,314 977,595 

Multi-family buildings (21 units) 1,500,000 75,000 

Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the responsibili- 
ty of the local building inspectors. Section 109.1.1 of that code requires 
all permit applicants to have State Construction Supervisor's licenses un- 
less they are the property owner. The office of the Inspection Department 
must keep an accurate registration of license holders in order to assure 
compliance with Section 109.1.1. The building inspectors continue the en- 
forcement of the code by making annual inspections of schools, churches and 
rest homes as well as other places of assembly. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the capacity of En- 
forcing Officer for Zoning and as such devotes many hours to investigation 
and enforcement of the Zoning Bylaw of the Town. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Ryan in the inspection of 
smoke detectors in new construction and additions and renovations were greatly 
appreciated. The Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect the installa- 
tion of solid fuel burning appliances with an ever continuing number of 
residents placing them into their homes. The residents are again reminded 
of the importance of having their wood stove installations inspected and 
certified in accordance with requirements of the Massachusetts State Building 
Code. Additionally, the inspectors and the Fire Chief have initiated an 
additional inspection requirement during the construction of new homes for 
chimneys . 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

As in past years, of the above listed inspections, a number were con- 
cerned with investigation, administration or enforcement in connection with 
violations. Enforcement of 248 CMR 2.00 The Uniform State Plumbing Code and 
the Massachusetts Fuel Gas Code is the responsibility of the local plumbing 
and gas inspectors. Letters and telephone calls were made in relation to 
violations of these state codes as well as referrals to the State Boards of 
Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters. The assistance of Michael Wright as 
Acting Assistant was appreciated once again during the absence of the Gas 
Inspector from time to time during the year. 



97 



WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electrical 
Code as well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of electrical 
installations for which permits are issued. As with the other inspectors in 
the department, re-inspections for violations are made where necessary and 

s and follow-up telephone calls are also made. The assistance of 
Tauno Aalto as Assistant Inspector of Wires during the periodic absences of 
the Wiring Inspector was greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. O'Toolz, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo , Local Inspector of Buildings 
JoAtph F. EhAkslm, Wiring Inspector 
WalX&i R. Nyo., Gas Inspector 
John A. Ro-6£, JK. , Plumbing Inspector 




SELECTMAN WILLIAM F. NOURSE CONGRATULATES ASSESSOR WILLIAM WALSH UPON HIS ELECTION 



98 



Jury List 1985 



JURY LIST 1985 



Robert L. Arnold 
77 Wood End Lane 

Brian T. Ballard 
91 South Street 

Thomas P. Barten 
20 Oak Street 

Thomas M. Battisti 
214 Causeway Street 

Merle L. Becker 
13 Stagecoach Road 

Richard G. Bell 
108 Harding Street 

Mary Ann Birsic 

58 Spring Street - Apt. #3 

Thomas J. Brangwynne 
13 Laurel Drive 

Sarah L. Brickley 
82 Adams Street 

James W. Bright 
44 Evergreen Way 

Paul A. Bright 
20 Ledgetree Road 

Lorraine J. Brown 
12 Fieldstone Drive 

Elizabeth A. Asher 
11 Pond View Avenue 

Richard W. Bryant 
139 Harding Street 

Michael D. Campa 
10 Evergreen Way 

Allison L. Campbell 
4 Fieldstone Drive 

Lester C. Canova 
16 Ledgetree Road 

Anna Carton 
1 Scott Road 

Patrick M. Casper 
35 Pleasant Street 

Linda Cas savant 
318 South Street 

Wendy G. Catenacci 
176 South Street 



Anthony C. Centore 
27 Longmeadow Road 

Sally Anne Childs 
9 Knollwood Road 

Mary E. Clancy 
49 Granite Street 

Mary T. Clarkin 
204 Causeway Street 

David F. Colby 
74 Granite Street 

Robert P. Conlon 
15 Tamarack Road 

Jeffrey W. Cook 

17 Knollwood Road 

Bernadette M. Curran 
20 Flint Locke Lane 

Arthur F. Davey 
5 Bartlett Avenue 

Joseph F. Dawe 
185 South Street 

John Desantis 
56 Green Street 

Ruth M. DeSorgher 
23 Summer Street 

James M. Donovan 

18 Knollwood Road 

Clara E. Doub 

31 Hillcrest Road 

Mary M. Downing 
86 Green Street 

Naomi D. Duff 
11 Shawnee Road 

Thomas C. Entrikin 
30 Hillcrest Road 

Steven W. Eppich 
9 Cross Street 

Joseph F. Erskine, Jr, 
5 Johns Avenue 

James E. Feehan 
340 Main Street 

Herbert G. Ferran 
7 Forest Street 



99 



Jury List 1985 



te C. Petteroll, Jr. 

18 Pound Street 

Robert N. Flagg 
L62 Main Street 

Edwin C. Flaherty 
15 Pleasant Street 

Kenneth A. Fowler 
9 Millbrook Road 

Mark R. Fuglestad 

14 Woodfall Road 

Jan A. Galezewski 
117 South Street 

Edward J. Gattozzi 
4 Crane Place 

John L. Glennon, Jr. 

3 John Avenue 

Michael T. Glynn 
41 Evergreen Way 

Thomas P. Godino, Jr. 
82 West Street 

Karen J. Goematt 
1 Newell Drive 

Sandra S. Gorham 

4 Ledgetree Road 

Ronald J. Graham 

5 Lantern Lane 

Leonard C. Haigh 
41 Rocky Lane 

James H. Hall 
129 South Street 

Donna C. Haney 

604 Wilkins Glen Road 

Robert D. Haxton 
163 Harding Street 

Mary M. Hay 

20 Hillcrest Road 

John M. Hayes, Jr. 
403 Main Street 

N'ormand J. Hemond 
29 Frairy Street 

Richard B. Hopewell 
37 Hatter's Hill Road 

Dorothy G. Ireland 
34 Evergree Way 

Frank M. Jablonski, Jr. 

15 Arnold Drive 

Lucy B. Jackson 

19 Lowell Mason Road 



100 



William M. Jackson 
299 South Street 

Karl H. Johnson 
59 Frairy Street 

Charna Katz 

146 Granite Street 

Robert Edward Kennedy, Jr. 
32 Green Street 

Patricia Diane Knapp 
91 Pleasant Street - C7 

Judith M. Kruntorad 

26 Stuart Street 

Ramona F. LaCount 
144 South Street 

Arthur L. Lomker 
14 Stonybrook Road 

Edward J. Love 

7 Boiling Spring Avenue 

Harry P. Macintosh 
7 Nauset Street 

Francis Mandile 

2 Stonybrook Road 

Christine M. Markowski 

3 Kamark Drive 

Peter F. Martino 
99 North Street 

Leslie Matz 
1 Pine Street 

Kathryn M. McCarthy 
25 Indian Hill Road 

David R. McDowell 

4 North Street 

Margaret Mary McLaughlin 
13 Lee Road 

Robert J. McNeil 
4 Newell Drive 

Valerie Monaco 

7 Lantern Lane 

Deborah L. Morton 
65 Indian Hill Road 

Jay W. Muir 

27 Vinald Road 

Christopher W. Nourse 
50 North Street 

Margo A. Novak 

8 Eastmont Road 

Shirley E. O'Brien 
20 Frairy Street 



Jury List 1985 



Denise E. Phelan 
44 Orchard Street 

Steven C. Plumeri 
56 Indian Hill Road 

John S. Posivak, Jr. 

14 Partridge Road 

John P. Poulakis 

3 Niantic Street 

Robert C. Rechner 
7 Hillcrest Road 

Elizabeth A. Rhoads 
92 North Street 

Charlene M. Rich 
72 Adams Street 

Grace P. Ritchie 
22 High Street 

Heather A. Rogers 
7 Hale Place 

Lynne A. Rucki 
13 Erik Road 

Edwin N. Sanborn 
663 Main Street 

Susan L. Scott 

15 Cheney Pond Road 

Everett R. Shaw 

4 Erik Road 

Laurence David Sheldon 
11 Curtis Drive 

Ross William Simon 
134 Causeway Street 

Dennis F. Simonaitis 
46 Colonial Road 

Lee F. Skillin 

13 Flint Locke Lane 

Kimberly A. Souza 

5 Haven Road 



Robert C. Tilton 
67 Pine Street 

Leonard W. Ulbricht 
11 Hilltop Circle 

Sarah Frances Uvezanian 
15 Dale Street 

William A. Walter 
66 High Street 

Olive E. Welton 
20 Miller Street 

Joanne White 

59 Frairy Street 

Robert E. White, Jr. 
11 Pound Street 

Robert G. Wiley 
9 Oriole Road 

Mary Ann Williamson 
14 Hatter's Hill Road 

John C. Willis 

14 Hearthstone Drive 

Mildred E. Willis 
14 Hearthstone Drive 

Frederick R. L. Wise 
140 Causeway Street 

Christopher Burtt 
24 Stuart Street 

Stephen Guy 

47 Janes Avenue - Apt. #7 

Richard L. Spalding 
13 Juniper Lane 

Ronald H. Taylor 
151 North Street 



Stanley G. Strom 
2 Grove Street 

Bonnie J. Strong 
9 Hillcrest Road 

Lucile F. Sturtevant 
286 North Street 

Joseph Sullivan, Jr. 
89 Pleasant Street - 3C 

John F. Sylvia 

5 Spruce Way 

Richard W. Taylor 

6 Elm Street 



101 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL 

TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Tri-County Regional School District Committee accepted with regret 
the resignation of two of its members: Timothy Greene (Sherborn) and 
Robert Riccio (North Attleboro) . The new members are Arthur Green (Sherborn) 
and Vincent Hoye (North Attleboro). Mr. Hoye was familiar with the operation 
of Tri-County, having been a faculty member for several years. 

The elected officers were: John Hanley (Seekonk) Chairman, Melvin Long 
(Norfolk) Vice-Chairman, Louis E. Hoegler (Walpole) Secretary. John Hurley 
(Medway) was appointed Chairman of the Personnel & Policy Sub-Committee and 
Robert Rappa (Franklin) was appointed Chairman of the Budget Sub-Committee. 
In addition to chairing the Collective Bargaining Sub-Committee, Albert 
Chouinard (Medfield) was named Chairman of the new Reform Review Sub-Com- 
mittee. 

As in the past, the School Committee members continue to provide in- 
valuable direction that lends itself to the constant improvement of the 
quality of education offered at Tri-County. The report that follows sub- 
stantiates that fact. 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

A close working relationship between academic and shop teachers has 
strengthened the curricula in all areas. Not only are the standards and 
college requirements being met, but also relevancy and application are 
demonstrated in a practical way. 

The Math Department has offered a pre-calculus course to those seniors 
planning to attend a technical college. Students in the science classes 
were introduced to concepts of laser technology as well as an updated unit 
on solar energy. Because Halley's Comet is a dramatic event occurring only 
once every 76 years, a mini-course was also added to the science subjects 
this year. The Business Department continued to work closely with the Dis- 
tributive Education Department, adding the latest "state-of-the-art" soft- 
ware in word processing, accounting, and filing systems. 

TECHNICAL DEPARTMENT 

As technology continues to develop, the importance of challenging the 
students in the technical courses becomes increasingly evident. Therefore, 
the seniors in Electronics have been introduced to the Advanced Placement 
course in Pascal with the expectation that they will be adequately prepared 
to deal with the sophisticated nature of the material. 

The emphasis and thrust of both technical and vocational programs has 
been to provide our students with the competitive edge in the work force. 
The Drafting and Graphic Arts curricula, along with Electronics, have 
utilized more complicated software to achieve that goal. Building upon the 
basic introduction last year to the CAD program and the Modular Composition 
Systems, students have progressed rapidly to programming those computers 

102 



with an improved degree of efficiency. 

VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

The largest project undertaken by several vocational trades is nearing 
completion. For the past two years, the Carpentry, Masonry, Electrical and 
Plumbing instructors and students have worked to restore the Attleboro Falls 
Fire Barn. The brick foundation was repaired, and the old chimney was re- 
moved and replaced by the masons. Plumbers have installed a totally new 
heating system including the furnace, kitchen and restroom facilities. The 
exterior and interior office space was worked on by the electricians and 
carpenters, transforming the building into a museum with the upper portion 
utilized by the North Attleboro /Plainville Chamber of Commerce. 

The~ Town of Millis hosted the state Little League playoffs last year and 
Tri-County participated in the preparation by repairing the two dugouts and 
constructing a press booth above the concession stand. 

SERVICE OCCUPATIONS 



Students enrolled in the Distributive Education program were involved 
in the opening of the Dean Cooperative Bank at Tri-County last March. Since 
it was the first bank in Norfolk County and the first cooperative bank to 
establish a school branch, the ribbon cutting ceremony was televised on the 
Channel 5 Evening news. Under the supervision of a Dean Cooperative Bank 
employee, junior and senior D.E. students have functioned as bank tellers, 
offering to the customers full banking services. 

The Cosmetology Department also expanded its offerings to the students 
and to the public it serves. The State Board of Registration in Cosmetology 
made an on-site examination and granted official approval for Tri-County to 
offer a 300-hour esthetician' s certification course. 

The nursery school, operating as an inherent part of the Child Care 
curriculum, continued to be a popular choice for mothers in the communities. 
The donation of a piano and the purchase of an autoharp expanded the musical 
dimensions of the program. 

The "Rainbow Room" enhanced their menu last year and offered its patrons 
a brunch on Fridays. In addition to the daily luncheon menu, a buffet was 
also introduced in order to broaden the students' knowledge of the culinary 
arts. 

The staff and students in the technical and service areas are grateful 
for the support given to them by members of the towns. 

EARLY ADMISSIONS 



An agreement has been worked out between Tri-County and Massachusetts 
Bay Community College whereby qualified high school seniors will be allowed 
admission to the College during the second semester of their senior year. 
Qualifying students must be in the top ten percent of their class and will 
receive credits for graduation at Tri-County as well as credits for one 
full semester at Mass. Bay. They may continue to participate in Tri-County 
athletic teams, clubs and organizations and/or similar activities at the 
College. 

GRADUATION 

On June 2, 213 students were graduated in an impressive ceremony. 

103 



Mr, Wayne Cot tie. President of the Dean Cooperative Bank in Franklin was the 
featured speaker and music was provided by the Southeastern Community Concert 
Band. Medfield students who received their diplomas are: 

Robert Bean Anne Commane Bryant Fay 

Charles Fernald Daniel Gilpatrick Keith Heisler 

Christopher Hersee Mark Higgins Robert James 

Kimberly Lake Ernest Roy Robert Scobie 
Mark Walsh 

ADMISSIONS 

In September, 224 ninth grade students enrolled at Tri-County. Of that 
number, nine were Medfield residents. We are now educating 41 Medfield 
students out of a total enrollment of 874 district residents and 27 non-dis- 
trict (tuition) residents. The Town of Medfield's rate of participation has 
been established at 4.69%. 

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

The lowest unemployment rate of any graduating class was claimed by the 
Class of 1985. Of those 213 students, 54% found employment in their trade 
areas, 20% were employed in other areas, 15% were accepted into college and 
6% entered the military service. The status of 3.5% is unknown. 

Tri-County was proud to have three Commonwealth scholars receiving 
$1,000.00 each in scholarship money at graduation. A total of $18,000.00 
was awarded to deserving seniors, with one student receiving full tuition to 
Central New England College. 

The Pupil Services Department administered the Preliminary Scholastic 
Aptitude Test, S.R.A. Achievement Tests, the Armed Services Vocational 
Aptitude Test Battery, and the Massachusetts Basic Skills Tests. 

The Guidance Department also arranged for "Eddie Was Here". This power- 
ful true story depicting the tragedy of drug and alcohol abuse resulting in 
the loss of a 16 year old life was acted by Tri-County students. The entire 
student body viewed the performance and many returned with their parents in 
the evening. 

The Director of Pupil Services and the counselors are in the process of 
scheduling tours, assemblies, and interviews to select the incoming 
Freshman Class for September 1986. 

SPECIAL NEEDS DEPARTMENT 



During the past year, Tri-County continued to offer a full range of 
special education programs under Chapter 766. 

The Department was the recipient of a Rainbow 100 computer from Digital 
Equipment Corporation for use by the hearing impaired students attending 
Tri-County. Through the use of this computer, students enhanced their know- 
ledge in several academic subjects - language arts, mathematics and 
chemistry to name a few. 

With the acquisition of a telephone modem, the special needs staff was 
placed on-line with the Clark School for the Deaf. This access to unlimited 
information supplies both teachers and students with readily available 
options and alternatives. 

104 



New to the Special Needs Department was the presence of an adminis- 
trative intern who not only received invaluable real experience but also pro- 
vided assistance in many areas, such as grant writing. 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

The athletic teams experienced a very lean year in the win/loss column 
but many outstanding individual performances emerged throughout the athletic 
seasons. 

The girls' programs (basketball and softball) were led by perennial all- 
star LuAnn Cormier of Franklin. LuAnn has been the heart and soul of the 
girls' programs for the past four years. 

The boys' basketball team experienced a winless season. Doug Bowden 
(North Attleboro) was awarded the Most Improved Player Award and the "Cougar 
Award" was given to Steve Wolff (Franklin) . 

The girls' volleyball team, however, was outstanding. Winning nine of 
their sixteen games, they were runner-up in their division. Four of the 
girls were named to the all-star team in the Mayflower League: Holly Hicks 
(Walpole) , Terri Chelebek (North Attleboro) , Elizabeth Wallace (Franklin) , 
and Carolanne Gleason (Walpole) . 

Since this was the first year of participation in volleyball, an even 
better record is anticipated for next year. 

The Tri-County hockey team was a J.V. Squad in 1985 and the future looks 
bright with Charlie Robinson and Chip Bradbury (Franklin) leading the way. 

EVENING SCHOOL 



In addition to the usual adult continuing education courses in the past, 
two new courses were offered: Control Systems for Commercial, Industrial 
and Residential Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning, and Basic Computer 
Programming. 

"The Comet Halley and Other Astronomical Delights" will begin December 
2nd and will end in April 1986, since that will be the best viewing time in 
the Northern Hemisphere. It will be presented as a non-technical, "down to 
earth" approach to finding the comet. This program will not be offered 
again until the year 2061. 

ACTIVITY PERIOD 

Last Spring a group of teachers presented a plan designed to foster 
greater school spirit and encourage more participation in extracurricular 
activities. The "Activity Period" was initiated in the Fall and more than 
400 students chose to become involved. 

In addition to sports such as football, cross-country and volleyball, 
sixteen other activities were available that ranged from "aerobics" to 
"yearbook". The success of these enrichment programs was evidence by the 
increase in offerings and the even larger numbers of students involved at 
the end of the second semester. 

The interaction between students and teachers in nontraditional settings 
has served as catalyst in establishing an even more positive learning atmos- 
phere in the classroom. 

105 



MTV SERVICE 

The facilities at Tri-County were made available for use by a number of 
community organizations throughout the year. The American Red Cross held 
two successful bloodmobiles and the Franklin Life Savers Association offered 
courses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and "choke saving" several times 
during the year. 

BOOSTERS CLUB BINGO 



Through the efforts of Tri-County Boosters Club, led by Mrs. Frances 
DeBaggis, the school was granted permission by the Massachusetts State 
Lottery Commission to serve as an official site for Bingo. Since June 13, 
1985, more than 300 people have been attending the Thursday night games each 
week. The proceeds will be used to benefit the school in general and the 
students in particular. For example, benches for the members of the 
athletic teams were purchased in the Fall and several educational field trips 
were sponsored by the Boosters Club as a result of the bingo games. 

BUDGET 



The assessment to the Town of Medfield for Fiscal Year 1986 is in the 
amount of $130,391.76. That figure represents an enrollment of 50 Medfield 
students (October 1984) out of a total enrollment of 947 or 5.28% of a total 
assessment of $2,469,541.00. 

SUMMARY 

As we move into 1986 and continue to provide the best in educational 
needs to our students, we thank the district residents for their support and 
cooperation. We intend to maintain in the future these high educational 
standards that have earned us that support in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John V. HanZ^y, Chairman 
MbeAt G. CkoiUnaAd, Medfield 



106 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1985 



107 



REPORT OF THE 
SCHOOL COMMFTTEE 



The Medfield School Committee remains committed to providing each of our 
students with a quality education that will allow them to grow and succeed in 
today's world. We feel that through the efforts of our administration and 
teaching staff this goal has again been met for the past school year. 

It is evident to the School Committee, however, that the task of balanc- 
ing educational needs and available dollars is becoming increasingly difficult, 

Declining enrollment has allowed the school system to realize certain 
savings due to the need for fewer teachers. It is recognized, however, that 
savings of this type cannot go on indefinitely and that we may be reaching 
the point where further staff reductions will be harmful to the educational 
process. Be assured, that despite continuing financial constraints, the 
School Committee will strive to maintain the integrity of our educational 
programs and desirable teacher -pupil ratios. 

After two years of study and planning, major school reorganization in 
Medfield became a reality in September 1985. The Memorial School, which had 
served the Town for some thirty-five years was closed for educational use, 
with kindergarten through grade 3 being moved from there to the Wheelock 
School. 

In the spring, the School Committee appointed the Memorial School Re-use 
Committee, to study re-use possibilities and to make recommendations for the 
future of the building. After considering the options of either selling the 
building or leasing it, a recommendation that the facility be leased was 
made, and two potential tenants were presented. The School Committee, along 
with the Board of Selectmen, agreed to lease the building to the South Norfolk 
County Association for Retarded Citizens (SNCARC) , for a three-year period 
with options to extend the lease beyond that time. By continuing to own the 
building, the Town is protected in the event our school population increases 
to the point that the facility is needed again. 

The other aspects of reorganization saw the 4th and 5th grades move from 
Wheelock School to the Dale Street School and the 6th grade move to the 
Junior High School to become part of the new Middle School. The School 
Committee feels this grade structure is educationally sound and will make 
the most efficient use of our school buildings. 

The School Committee would like to commend the administration and staff 
for the outstanding job they did in completing the reorganization move. The 
management and coordination of the move by the Superintendent and his staff 
resulted in a smooth school opening in September, after a hectic spring and 
summer of transporting material and furnishings and preparing classrooms. 
Also a special thanks is due to the many staff members who volunteered their 
own time to help in the move. 

The 1985 school year is the first in which the Town has had a Middle 
School organization. The School Committee last year adopted the philosophy 
of the Middle School for grades 6-8. It is hoped that this will provide a 
better transition between the self-contained classrooms of elementary school 
and the fully departmentalized classes of the High School. 

108 



The Medfield Middle School structure is set up with students within each 
grade being assigned to a team of teachers. Teachers on each team are given 
time to meet and formulate ideas and strategy for teaching students on their 
teams. The School Committee has been pleased with the results of team-teaching 
and looks forward to continued refinements and improvements to the program. 

In the collective bargaining area, the School Committee and the Medfield 
Teachers Association agreed in 1985 to a three-year contract. The contract 
calls for three successive 5.25% salary increases for each year of the 
contract as well as other non-economic changes. This contract will expire 
after the 1987-1988 school year. 

As a result of years of overuse and inattention, due to a lack of funds, 
the condition of our athletic fields has deteriorated over the years and are 
now in less than satisfactory condition. In hopes of remedying this, the 
School Committee, at the April 1985 Town Meeting, asked for funds to begin a 
field rehabilitation program. 

A special article asking for $120,000 was submitted to the Capital Outlay 
Committee, but due to other Town demands, was reduced to $40,000. This 
amount was approved by Town Meeting. The School Committee has chosen to set 
aside this amount and to seek an additional $40,000 at the April 1986 Town 
Meeting. This would provide an amount sufficient to rehabilitate the girls' 
field hockey field behind the Junior High School. The long-range plan is to 
continue to seek funding to develop a football practice field and to rehabil- 
itate the fields behind Wheelock School. 

As part of the effort to improve communications with the community, and 
to provide citizens with a convenient way to address the School Committee, a 
fifteen minute period has been set aside at the beginning of each meeting for 
public participation. This allows any citizen to address the Committee 
without the necessity of being on the agenda. The Committee hopes that 
residents will take advantage of this opportunity to keep the School Committee 
informed as to their concerns. 

The success of our educational program in Medfield is due in no small 
part to the efforts of the many volunteers who provide such a valuable 
service. On behalf of the School Committee I would like to thank all of the 
volunteers who have done so much. Without them our programs would not have 
the richness and quality that we have grown accustomed to. Groups such as 
the School Boosters, the Music Boosters, Community School Association, the 
Lions Club, the Jaycees, the Medfield Women's Association, the League of 
Women Voters and many others, all deserve a vote of thanks from the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

\jtiZZAjam A. Ha j Jan., Chouxman 
F. VauJL Qua&iomoni 
ScuibaAa Jane. Tupp&i 

Gay W. V'AmaAo 
Rob&vt A. KlnAman 



109 



REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

Each new school year brings its own problems and challenges, and 1985 
was no exception. The major thrust of this year's challenge was to continue 
to deliver quality education and to maintain staff enthusiasm and morale 
while adjusting to a grade 6, 7, 8 Middle School reorganization, reopening 
the Dale Street School for grades 4 and 5 and moving grades K-3 from the 
Memorial School to the Wheelock School. 

The most notable effect on progress in the areas listed above was the 
loss of new young staff members. Reductions in staff have not only caused 
the removal of some non-tenured teachers from our classrooms, but also im- 
pacted a teacher who had been teaching here in Medfield for four years. The 
freshness and enthusiasm of new entries to the field of education is gone and 
anxiety about job security is high. Attention is now being turned to ways 
to revitalize and stimulate those staff members who remain. 

The competition for resources continues as we try to meet our specific 
needs. There is steady pressure being placed on our fixed budget from rising 
costs. This is especially true in the areas of salaries and maintenance. If 
it were not for the continued decline in enrollment, the leveling off of 
energy costs and additional State aid, it would have been necessary for us 
to eliminate programs and to have markedly increased our class sizes. 

The education community and the Town were saddened by the death of Mr. 
Charles Laverty on May 15, 1985. Mr. Laverty served Medfield, in various 
roles, for twenty-nine years. He was a teacher of Math, Typing, English 
and Latin. He always gave of himself for students, not only in the classroom, 
but also in student activities and counseling. 

The accidental death on December 20, 1985, of Amy Fiske, a senior at 
Medfield High School, was a tremendous shock and saddened everyone. She 
continues to be in our thoughts and is greatly missed by the entire commun- 
ity. She was extremely talented in the arts and was active in the AFS 
Exchange Program. A scholarship has been established in her memory. 

This year, as in the past, hundreds of hours of service and expertise 
were delivered by volunteers. These volunteers worked at all grade levels 
in support of educational programs and to meet the specific needs of child- 
ren. The Medfield Public School System is indebted to each of these persons 
for giving of their time and talents. These volunteers play an important 
role in helping us to service the young people of Medfield. 

The future looks promising. The School Administration and School 
Committee believe that the staff of well-prepared, dedicated and experienced 
teachers will continue to deliver quality education so that Medfield students 
may compete with confidence with their contemporaries. 



110 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 
Ten Year Comparison of Enrollments, October 1 

76-77 77-78 78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82 82-83 83-84 84-85 



5-86 



SPED 


16 


18 


18 


18 


14 


17 


14 


18 


19 


8 


Kg. 


174 


158 


128 


128 


116 


133 


119 


145 


135 


126 


1 


194 


177 


153 


134 


139 


114 


142 


138 


150 


150 


2 


192 


201 


186 


141 


140 


141 


118 


134 


130 


150 


3 


192 


197 


196 


187 


135 


144 


140 


120 


141 


131 


4 


208 


195 


196 


198 


192 


128 


137 


138 


121 


137 


5 


216 


219 


207 


198 


202 


197 


134 


140 


141 


124 


6 


226 


230 


218 


211 


200 


204 


193 


136 


151 


133 


7 


232 


226 


224 


213 


214 


187 


198 


189 


135 


149 


8 


245 


225 


241 


222 


210 


208 


191 


198 


186 


133 


9 


240 


203 


195 


213 


182 


188 


178 


170 


178 


161 


10 


218 


217 


205 


204 


214 


180 


188 


172 


167 


178 


11 


226 


197 


220 


201 


191 


213 


166 


187 


165 


168 


12 


205 


227 


204 


221 


201 


181 


190 


168 


182 


168 


Totals 


2784 


2690 


2591 


2489 


2350 


2235 


2108 


2053 


2001 


1916 



Respectfully submitted, 
Thomcu, M. ReX6 
Superintendent of Schools 



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120 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NEW PERSONNEL AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



JUNIOR HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL 



*Coffey, Patricia 
Crane, Diane 
Hicks, Donna 
Miner, Martha 
Moretti, John 
Ward, Diana 



September 

September 

June 

November 

January 

September 



Fleming, Frances 

*Hayes, Robin 
McVicar, Cornelia 
Miner, Deirdre 

*Oertel, Martha 

*Wiley, Kaye 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
June 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



PUPIL SERVICES 



*Bannon, Lynda 
Han key, Robert 



LIB/MEDIA AIDES 



September Amato, Carol September 

September *Esper, Theresa September 

Rosenfeld, Rene January 

SPECIAL NEEDS AIDES 



*Gablehart, Ruth 
Miller, Martha 



September 
September 



Medina, Susan 
Miner, Deirdre 



September 
September 



GRADE ONE AIDES 



COMPUTER AIDES 



Dunlea, Cheryl 
White, Linda 



September 
January 



Kenneally, John 
Rose, Teri 



September 
September 



CHAPTER I AIDE 

*Interrante, Janet 

FOOD SERVICES 

Carson, Sadie 
Kenney, Charles 
Morgan, Michael 
Timmerman, Regina 



September 



September 
April 
February 
February 



CUSTODIANS 

Boudreau, Jeffrey 
Eldridge, Frank 
Erb, Daryl 
Fralin, Stephanie 
Kenney, Charles 



June 

January 

February 

September 

October 



Schortmann, Frederick January 



*Part-time employee 
LEAVES OF ABSENCE 



Cook, Janet 
Darcy-Campbell, Karen 
Dolan, Cheryl 
Lee, James 
Meehan, William 
Noble, Judith 
Pope, William 
Rieger, Richard 
Weinstock, Leslie 



Dale Street School 

Pupil Services 

Pupil Services 

Wheelock School 

Pupil Services 

Senior High (Sabbatical) 

Wheelock School 

Custodian 

Wheelock School 

121 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



TERMINATIONS 



TERMINATION AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



JUNIOR HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL 



Callanan, Nancy 
Cardoza, Richard 
Estep, Janet 
Hicks, Donna 



October 
December 
May 
September 



Laverty, Charles(Deceased) 
Mulkern, Michael June 



May 



Fiedler, Carol June 

Hart, Eileen August 

*Holland, Lorraine May 

*Kilgore, Sheila June 

McVicar, Cornelia June 

*Rice, Sandra June 

Smith, Lee August 

*Ward, Diana June 



WKEELOCK SCHOOL 



PUPIL SERVICES 



'Furman, Amy 
Robbins, Constance 


June 
June 


Olshever, Debra 
Starr, Jaclyn 


Septembe: 
June 


GRADE ONE AIDE 




COMPUTER AIDE 




White, Linda 


April 


Deschenes, Mary 


June 


LIBRARY AIDE 








Dunlea, Cheryl 
Sostek, Diane 


June 
June 






FOOD SERVICES 




CUSTODIANS 




Morgan, Michael April 
Simonaitis, Ann February 
Sloan, Marj or ie (Retired) February 
Timmerman, Regina December 


Erb, Daryl February 
Gates, Robert February 
Lazdowsky, Donald January 
Mott, Harold (Retired) January 
Walls, Thomas(Retired) May 



*Part-time employee 



122 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 

SUPERINTENDENT 

FOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with considerable pleasure that I submit my report for the year 
1985. In a year of great difficulties in respect to the budget and to reor- 
ganization, I have enjoyed and am grateful for the support of the Central 
Office, the Business Office, Food Services, Maintenance, and Custodial areas. 
We have also continued to enjoy an excellent rapport with the Town Hall and 
with all Town Boards, for which we are also grateful. It is only with the 
effort of these people that we have survived the year "right-side-up." 

The largest effort of the year was probably the reorganization of the 
schools and the leasing of Memorial School. In reorganizing, we moved 54 
classrooms, involving three schools, plus resource rooms, nurses' offices, 
school offices, three library/lMCs, gyms, etc. This was done with approxi- 
mately seven days of work by a moving contractor, and four added personnel 
for the summer. Getting rooms ready, setting up one new library area, opening 
school areas which had been closed for several years, and the logistics in- 
volved in getting approximately 6000 boxes of materials to their correct 
destination was a challenge we won't soon forget. It is to the credit of 
everyone in the system that this was done with as little upset as was experi- 
enced, and I cannot say enough that our personnel should be extremely proud 
of this achievement. The help of the Medfield Prison Project in readying 
these areas for occupation by painting major portions of Dale Street School 
and other schools was greatly appreciated. 

In the area of budget, we reaped the problems of having passed a budget 
with an increase of 3% the previous year; we experienced deficits in many 
accounts, and only with severe restrictions were we able to complete the year. 
Our new budget will necessarily reflect some of the problems which were 
carried over into this year (1986-87 proposal) . 

Memorial School was closed, and we were successful in gaining a lease 
with the South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens. This study 
was conducted by a citizens' committee which spent much time on the question, 
researching all possible means of using the building. The members of this 
committee brought expertise in many appropriate areas, and their help in 
presenting the School Committee with a report and recommendation is immeasur- 
able. The people of Medfield, as always, were ready and able to help when 
they were called upon. 

Medfield remains one of the few schools in the area that can be proud of 
a Food Service program which continues to pay for itself thanks to the efforts 
of the Cafeteria Director and her staff. They have continued to present 
lunches that draw students, and have also continued their work in association 
with nutrition education in the schools. We experience very high participa- 
tion in the lunch program, and this is due in large measure to the way lunches 
are presented and served. With the closing of Memorial School, the kitchen 
at Dale Street was opened, and we no longer are transporting lunches to any 
building — each school has its own cafeteria and cafeteria staff. 



123 



On the level of accounting and financing, we have instituted a new 
computerized system of accounting, using the Microbudget program. This 
promises to keep us abreast of our finances in a very efficient manner, and 
replaces a machine calculator which was purchased in 1968, and for which it 
was becoming increasingly difficult to obtain maintenance. The new system 
will allow us to update and add systems as they become available and useful. 

The High School roof project was completed in August 1985; this 
completes a project which was begun in 1975, to convert the flat roof which 
had presented major maintenance problems to a tapered roof. 

Minor roof damage was experienced at four of the school buildings from 
Hurricane Gloria; however, nearly all of the damage cost was recovered through 
insurance coverage. 

With the reorganization of the schools, there were problems in bus 
transportation; because of the added grade in the secondary complex, four 
double runs were required, which necessitated very early pickups and very 
late dropoffs in many cases on the secondary level. Without added buses, this 
is the only way the problem could be approached; however, since we plan to 
exchange the early/late buses on February 3rd, at least we can offer the fact 
that the inconvenience will be shared equally. With a proposal for a change 
in school opening schedules in September 1986, this problem will hopefully 
be solved. We are presently in the third year of our three-year contract for 
transportation, and will be looking for a renewal of contract for transporta- 
tion to begin in September 1986. 

Currently, there are several projects being given serious consideration. 
We are studying the telephone system for ways that might make it more 
efficient and cost-effective, and perhaps correct some of the problems which 
have crept into it through sporadic growth over the past twenty-five years. 
We are also studying several ways of further using our computer capabilities — 
for scheduling, attendance, further budget uses, etc. We are also researching 
further handicapped accessibility to our schools, to bring them all to 
proper standards as soon as possible. 

A major capital outlay program is planned for the development and re- 
covery of our playing fields, which have not been cared for as well as most 
of us would like. 

We continue to support the use of our facilities by many Town organiza- 
tions whenever they are available and such use does not interfere with the 
educational use of the facilities. Our gymnasiums and other areas are open 
to use by groups from Corning, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, CYO basketball, men's 
and women's activities, and of course the extensive adult education program. 

I have continued to represent the School Department on community organ- 
izations which relate to the schools; in particular, the Architectural 
Barriers Commission and the Land Management Committee. 

I would again like to thank the people of Medfield for their encourage- 
ment and for their many kindnesses as I approach the third year as Assistant 
Superintendent for Business Affairs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Van E. Hogan 

Assistant Superintendent for 
Business Affairs 
124 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School I respectfully submit our Annual 
Report for the school year ending December 31, 1985. 

The official enrollment of the high school this year was 517. There were 
183 students in the Class of 1985. Of these 72.9% went on to a four-year 
college; 14.7% to a two-year college; 3.2% attended a non-college educational 
institution; 1% enlisted in the Armed Services; 8.2% entered the world of 
work. 

In the Class of 1985, Laura M. Vasaturo was named Valedictorian and 
Jennifer Sarah Cole was named Salutatorian. Seventeen percent of the 
graduates were members of the National Honor Society. 

During the past school year the National Merit Scholarship Corporation 
notified Medfield High School that three of its students were named as 
finalists, three were named semi-finalists and nine received letters of 
commendation in the National Merit Scholarship Program. 

The SAT averages for the Class of 1985 were reported in the fall of the 
current school year. The Verbal Mean Score was 470 and the Math Mean Score 
was 509. Over 92% of the class took the College Boards. 

Our faculty this year consisted of 57 certified professionals. Advanced 
degrees are held by 73% of the staff. Continual professional improvement is 
evident by the many courses which our faculty takes yearly. 

During the past year our Academic Standards Committee, the Student/ 
Faculty/Parent Advisory Committee and the Student Council met on a regular 
basis and discussed many issues of concern. Through the open discussions 
of these committees we have been able to make many positive changes in our 
school. 

This year six girls and eight boys represented Medfield High School at 

Boys' and Girls' State. This annual event gives Medfield High School 

students the opportunity to meet with peers across the state in a mock 
political convention. 

Our departments continued to meet on a regular basis for the purpose 
of standardizing such things as reading and writing assignments, grading, 
testing, and homework assignments. Through an on-going evaluation by the 
administration it is evident that improvements in these areas have been made. 

Many of our high school students were honored by receiving recognition 
for outstanding performance in several subject areas. 



125 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School 
Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the Assistant Superintendent, and 
the many parents and community groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TO4404 P. ¥iZlzd<U 

Principal 




126 



GRADUATION EXERCISES OF 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 

1985 

Sunday, June 9, 1985 - 2:00 p.m. 

PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Class of 1985 

"Pomp and Circumstance" - Elgar Medfield High School Concert Band 

Douglas Godfrey, Director 

INVOCATION Reverend Charles P. Weber 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Medfield High School Concert Band 

WELCOME David M. Giard 

President, Class of 1985 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Thomas M. Reis 

Superintendent of Schools 

HONOR ESSAYS Laura M. Vasaturo and Jennifer Sarah Cole 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Joanne L. Bumpus 

Vice President, Class of 1985 

PRESENTATION TO FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENT Ann Thompson 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

A.F.S. Student Michel Chalifour - St. Myacinthe, Canada 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

D.A.R. Certificate 

Friends of Medfield Library Book Award Marjorie K. Finley 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Award Robert and Carol Ness 

Medfield Teachers Association John Cuoco, President 

American Legion Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 Barbara Morgan 

American Legion Medals Edward Fralin 

Medfield Fitness Association 

Robert S. Belmont Memorial Scholarship Stephen Astle 

Bob Porack Memorial Award Robert Lester Porack 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Lynda St. James 



127 



PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

Ohio University Scholarship 
Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of 
America, Inc . 

Data General Coporation Scholarship 
Dart and Kraft Merit Scholarship 

Johnson & Wales College Scholarship 
Page Realty Scholarship 

Wheelock College Scholarship 
National Honor Society Scholarship 



William A. Hajjar 

Medfield School Committee 

Gay D'Amaro 
Medfield School Committee 

Robert Kinsman 
Medfield School Committee 

F. Paul Quatromoni 
Medfield School Committee 



Student Council Scholarship 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarship 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarship 

Medfield Music Boosters Scholarship 

Corning Medical Scholarship 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship 

Medfield Jaycees Scholarship 

Medfield Jaycees-Women Scholarship 

Robert Luke Memorial Scholarship 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship 



William Meehan 

Elaine Hegedus 

Clarence Purvis 

Elizabeth Finn 

Rose Johnson 

Richard Bishop 

Terry Shiels 

Sue Buckley 

Richard DeSorgher 

Edward Fralin 



Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Scholarship Thomas Kelly 



MESSAGE TO CLASS OF 1985 



William A. Hajjar 
Chairman, Medfield School Committee 



PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

William A. Hajjar, Chairman 

Medfield School Committee 
Thomas M. Reis, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 

BENEDICTION Reverend Virgil E. Murdock 

RECESSIONAL The Class of 1985 

"Consecration of the House"-Beethoven Medfield High School Concert Band 



128 



CLASS OF 1985 



Lee A. Abernethy 
Paul Lawrence Abrams 
Deborah L. Alberta 
*Pamela Ruth Anderson 
Frederick A. Austin 
Craig E. Backer 
Robert S. Bagdasarian 
W. Blair Baldwin 

* //Brian T. Ballard 
Jane A. Bannister 
*Edward A. Barrows, Jr. 
Gregory Belloli 
Keith Nelson Berg 
Kenneth P. Berthiaume 
Tracy D. Bledsoe 
David Eric Bloomquist 
Joanne M. Bonanno 
Michelle Ann Boudette 
Laura M. Bright 

*//Sara F. Brock 

*//Stephen R. Brockelman 

*//Michelle L. Brown 
* Joanne L. Bumpus 
Todd Robert Burchard 
Denise Patricia Burden 
Shauna M. Burke 
Jennifer L. Butler 
Jeffrey R. Caff erelli 
*Ansley Gwen Campbell 
Colleen Mary Cargen 
John F. Carmichael 
Joel M. Cassidy 

*//Susan Michelle Cassidy 
Michel Chalifour 
Madeline Marie Chase 
Donald R. Christy 
Thomas B. Chudzik, Jr. 
Robert Edward Church 
Laura Christina Cipriani 
Thomas Ailing Clarke 
*Maryellen Elizabeth Cola 

*//Jennifer Sarah Cole 
Christine A. Coleman 
Frederic Corsiglia 
James Alexander Cos 
Richard J. Coughtry 
Christine L. Coyne 
Erin Patricia Crawley 
Tanya Renee D' Orlando 
Barbara Dawn Daniels 

*//Dawn Marie Daniels 
Mark Alan DeBerry 



Michelle Denise Dennison 

Elaine M. Dewar 

Johanna Dilorenzo 

Edward John Doherty 

Kimberly Ann Duclow 

Cathleen Mary Dugan 

Jeffrey J. Dumas 

Tracy Leigh Eberling 

J. Stephen Edwards 

Gary M. Fetteroll 
//David L. Finn 

Tammy R. Fitch 

David A. Fleming 

Timothy Craig Foster 

Michelle J. Foucre 

Julie A. Fraser 

Brian E . Frazier 
//Holly Frazier 

Hope Noel Gabelhart 

Patrick F. Gallagher 

Holly Lynn Gates 

Edward D. Gattozzi 

Lisa Ann Gavrilles 

Robert J. Geiger 
*//David M. Giard 
*Lisa Jaime Goodall 

Arthur N. Gorham 

Kathleen Marie Gorman 
*William Charles Gould 

Herbert F. Grace 

Penelope J. Harding 
*//Christine Marie Harney 

Patricia Catherine Haverty 

Janell Haxton 

Michael P . Hayes 

Karen E. Hibbert 

Brian Charles Higgins 

Sandra Delia Higgins 

Gregory J. Hoffman 

Brenda Lynn Iafolla 
*Carol M. Jenkins 

John J. Jones 

Kenneth A. Klein 

Matthew G. Klotz 

Sharon A. Knowles 
*//Paul Lawrence Korff 

Karen S. Kurtzman 

Stephanie Sims LaPolla 

Ilise J. Landesberg 

Eric N. Lars en 

Carmine LaVita 

Julie Diana Leibold 
129 



Denise Patricia Lewis 
*Linda Jean Lorantos 

Vary Luciano 

Paul J. Lyons 
*#David Craig MacDonald 

Tod A. Mack 

John P. Maloney 

Barry Owen Mandell 

Joseph A. Mariani 

Christine Marie Markowski 
Manet Anne Mason 

Edmund Robert Matczak 
*Mark Geoffrey Mathews 

Timothy P. McCormack 

Brenda L. McGee 

Daniel P. McGonagle 

Susan M. McGowan 

Kirsten Leigh McLaughlin 

Maryellen McPhee 

Peter E. Molloy 

Robert M. Moran 

Kristen J. Morgan 

Colleen M. Neary 

Kenneth E. Ness 

John A. Newell 

Laura Marie Newman 
*Brian Allan Norton 

Kathleen P. Norton 

Erin M. O'Brien 

Noreen O'Driscoll 

Thomas L. 0' Grady 

Bonnie E. Patterson 

Andrea Therese Payne 

Paul S. Perrone 

Joyce M. Phelan 
*//Sandra Elizabeth Pierce 
*/>Beth A. Pilch 

Nancy E. Powers 



James L. Priestley 

Amy Louise Putnam 
*Lauren L. Rebello 
♦//Christian D. Rheault 

Melissa Marie Rodriguez 

Kenneth J. Ryan 

Elizabeth Saporoschetz 

Richard Schroeder 

Scott Thomas Seager 

Cynthia Lee Shaw 

Diane M. Shiels 

Karen Elizabeth Simmons 

Katherine Elizabeth Simonaitis 

Eric J. Siroka 

Mary L. Slowey 

Geoffrey W. Smith 

Rhonda M. Suereth 

Kathleen E. Sullivan 

Sharon Sweeney 
//Allison Jean Sylvia 

Jeffrey P . Tate 

Kevin B. Thompson 

Laura D. Tlapa 
*Scott A. Tomsik 

Lisa Ann Tortorici 

Steven William Tragakis 
♦//Barbara J. Tubridy 

John L. Tulloch 

Mark E . Vadney 

David John Valzania 
*//Laura M. Vasaturo 

Oreana T. Wallace 

David M. Weinstock 

Kevin E. Weir 
*//Glen Thomas Whitney 

Mark Allen Whooten 

Donna A. Williams 

Michael G. Wilson 



MARSHALL S 
Karen M. Struck Brian M. Garrison 

// Upper 10% of the graduating class academically 
* National Honor Society 



130 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR 
HIGH/MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Medfield Junior High/Middle School, I respectfully 
submit the Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

This past year saw a major change in the organization of this school. 
Grade six was added to the existing grades of seven, eight and nine. In 
order to reflect the transitional state of the school changing from the 
Junior High School to the Middle School, the School has been called the 
Medfield Junior High/Middle School. 

The team concept was extended from the pilot team project in grade 
seven to one team in grade six, two teams in grade seven and two teams in 
grade eight. Grade nine was not teamed. Each team consisted of a teacher of 
English, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies, all teaching the same group 
of students. The sixth grade team also had a Reading teacher. 

The school year opened with 578 students; 135 in grade six, 150 in grade 
seven, 132 in grade eight and 161 in grade nine. The Tri-Valley Collabora- 
tive was not housed in this school this year. Nine of last year's eighth 
grade students enrolled in the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High 
School and three students enrolled at the Norfolk Agricultural School. 

New staff members to the Medfield Junior High/Middle School included 
the sixth grade teachers from the Wheelock School; Mrs. Frances Fleming, 
English; Ms. Robin Hayes, Reading; Mrs. Martha Oertel, Spanish; Ms. Kim 
McNeill, Resource Room; Mrs. Martha Miller, Library Aide; and Mrs. Kaye Wiley, 
Office Secretary. 

The Student Council, under the advisorship of Mr. Richard DeSorgher, 
continued to be a important part of the school experience. The students 
made generous contributions to projects for the needy, dances, field trips, 
special event days, and opened a school store. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. VoLLglaA Ida 

Principal 



131 



REPORT OF THE 
DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal this will be my seventeenth annual report and the first for 
Dale Street School for grades four and five for the year ending December 31, 
1985. To prepare for the beginning of school, the entire staff (teachers, 
office, maintenance, custodial) worked diligently during the summer to move 
equipment, materials and supplies from the Wheelock School. On Thursday, 
September 5 we opened our doors to 259 students. The classrooms were well- 
organized which provided a pleasant and relaxed atmosphere for the students. 

As part of the New England School Development Council Exchange Program, 
a team of our teachers visited schools in Norwich, Connecticut and Providence, 
Rhode Island. The objective of this visit was to investigate Math and En- 
richment Programs. Classroom activities were observed and teachers, parents 
and students were interviewed. Written reports were completed which included 
guidelines, suggestions, ideas for changes and reaffirmation of practices 
and procedures. 

Teachers from the Hingham School System visited our school to assess 
our enrichment programs and provided feedback and recommendations relative to 
expansion of our activities. They offered ideas for implementing new pro- 
grams for the future. Over twenty school systems in New England participated. 
The success of this experience was fully realized at a meeting in February 
when all schools submitted and shared their reports. This program will not 
only enhance and broaden our curriculum but will also contribute to the 
professional development of staff. 

Additional responsibilities were assigned to me which included Public 
Relations, Chairman of the Curriculum Council and Coordinator of In-Service 
programs. 

Arrangements were made to have a section entitled "Medfield Schools" to 
appear in our local newspaper. This page incorporated school events, activ- 
ities and programs and focused on student achievement and faculty recogni- 
tion and administration news. 

The Curriculum Council acted as advisors to the Superintendent in all 
matters related to the development and maintenance of a comprehensive 
Curriculum for grades K through 12. 

In-Service programs focused on staff development which included work- 
shops in Mat hematics, Science, Reading and Computers, and Instructional 
Materials. An exchange of ideas and recommendation for improvement of 
instruction resulted from these discussions. Parent Conferences, Discussion 
Meetings, Progress Reports and the School Newsletter continue to provide a 
channel of communication between school and home. 

The Intramural Program included activities such as floor hockey, 
basketball, aerobics, computers, school newspaper, and drama. Other events 
were being planned. This was the first year that this program was offered 
to fourth graders. Approximately 150 students from grades four and five 
participated. 

132 



In addition to our general classroom music, students particpated in the 
following programs revealing a high degree of interest and talent: 

Beginner program for grade four included 68 with wind 
and 19 with string instruments. Grade five included 
33 students in the band program and 14 in the orchestra. 
Along with small group sessions once a week, students had 
a large ensemble rehearsal before school. 

This staff was to be commended for their diligent and conscientious 
effort during the reorganization process and for their total dedication in 
attempting to meet the needs of the students. Office personnel provided the 
clerical assistance essential to the operation of the school. The Community 
School Association implemented programs and activities that contributed to 
the total school situation. The support and cooperation of custodial, cafeter- 
ia, and bus personnel was sincerely appreciated. 

The School Committee and Central Administration's leadership and 
direction has given us the educational programs that provide for the total 
development of students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thanh. J. Hodman 

Principal 



133 



REPORT OF THE 
RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the Wheelock School Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

Registrations at the primary level remained consistent with those re- 
corded during the previous school year. The number of sections required to 
insure reasonable class sizes has appeared to stabilize. The figures show 
grade level enrollments recorded on October 1, 1985. 

GRADE ENROLLMENT NUMBER OF CLASSES 

K 125 7 

1 150 7 

2 150 7 

3 131 6 

The centralization of all classes, Kindergarten to grade three, at the 
Ralph Wheelock complex facilitated improved communication between all levels 
of instruction, as well as improved continuity in the presentation of basic 

skills. 

The primary staff continued to impress this administrator with their 
dedication and professionalism. These educators consistently demonstrated 
a commitment to promoting an ideal climate for learning at this level. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

Again this year the school enjoyed excellent parent participation in all 
aspects of its functioning. As a result of the commitment of over two 
hundred parents, previously instituted enrichment programs were able to con- 
tinue, while new and expanded offerings were introduced. The scope of "What's 
It Like," Medfield's program to sensitize its youth to a broad range of 
disabilities, was broadened to cover topics appropriate for children in 
grades two and three. Individualized testing of the entire student population 
to determine learning style preferences and strengths, was completed. 

The Parent Advisory Council established a prioritized list of topics 
and issues to be addressed during the school year. The presentation of a 
series of programs for parents and children relative to child abuse, neglect, 
and abduction was well received and widely attended. Parents were advised 
as to appropriate ways to protect their child and video identification was 
offered through corporate funding. The PAC also sponsored a discussion 
series for parents and children addressing substance abuse. A record number 
of parents attended this program and their feedback supports the need for 
continued exposure to serious parenting issues. 

The Community School Association has been instrumental in providing our 
school community with family oriented social functions and fund raisers. The 

134 



funds generated have been distributed so as to impact on a variety of educa- 
tional needs including computer education, library equipment, performances 
in the fine arts, classroom manipulatives and materials to improve the 
school's physical environment. 

Parents demonstrated their eagerness to participate in school related 
activities by joining their children at Parent Lunch Days, Open House, 
classroom visitation days, Flag Day and the winter and spring music festivals. 
Parent-Teacher conferences and Parent In-Service programs were offered to 
enable parents to become more familiar with the academic program at the 
primary level. 

CURRICULUM 

A year of teacher In-Service was culminated with a summer workshop 
resulting in the publication of a "K-3 Writing Skills Curriculum Guide" for 
the Medfield Public Schools. This handbook has established a sequential 
developmental approach to writing. The reading system currently in place, 
resulted in superior results as measured by the California Achievement 
Tests. Enrichment experiences in the language arts continued to be offered, 
along with specialized programs for remediation and reteaching. 

The Computer Science curriculum once again was expanded with the in- 
creased availability of additional hardware. The accessibility of print 
material has improved with the relocation of the library to the Wheelock 
School. Book circulation on a daily basis averaged over one hundred and 
fifty items per day. 

SCHOOL PROGRAMS 

A wide range of experiences were offered to our pupils designed to 
enrich the academic program at each grade level. Each child participated in 
a significant performance for the community, once during the year. Activi- 
ties that were scheduled to acknowledge individual strengths and talents 
included an art festival, field day, specialized computer labs, hobby and 
craft nights, school talent shows, a weather club, and great books discussion 
groups. 

The Thanksgiving environmental project, made possible through the 
combined efforts of the school and the Medfield Girl Scout Council, made a 
long lasting impression on our third grade pupils. In addition to social 
studies lessons presented in each classroom, activities were scheduled to 
promote a love for our country. These activities included a Memorial Day 
observance, a special Flag Day salute and a humanitarian project in which 
seedlings were planted to later be harvested in order to provide food for 
the needy. An awareness of the world community was accomplished through 
child-oriented fund raising activities to sponsor our foster child in Sudan. 

SUMMARY OBSERVATIONS 

The Wheelock School staff is very aware of the need to assess, evaluate 
and modify the existing academic program to best meet the needs of the 
students it serves. This can best be accomplished through continued parent 
involvement. As the number of families with working parents increases, it 
has become more difficult for many parents to participate in school activi- 
ties during school hours. However, a great number of parents continue to 
be active in the school program outside the context of the school day, either 
through their action or by their participation and support. 

135 



It is this interest in children, in learning, and in the need for a 
strong comprehensive curriculum, that makes Medfield a special place in which 
to raise the decision makers of tomorrow. With the leadership of the Superin- 
tendent, and the confidence of the School Committee, we will continue to 
research new ideas, introduce creative strategies and implement those methods 
that have enabled our children to meet with high achievement in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ZLckaAd M. FJXzpcuOUck 

Principal 

REPORT OF THE 
PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit the department report for the year 
ending December 31, 1985. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The census indicated below is in keeping with figures from previous 
years. However, we are finding an increased number of 3 and 4 year olds in 
need of service. The growing numbers of youngsters in this age group during 
the last two years have prompted us to begin exploring program development 
for pre-schoolers with moderate special needs. 

Students December 1, 1984 December 1, 1985 

Ages 3-5 22 23 

Ages 6-17 223 221 

Ages 18-21 7 13 

252 Total 257 Total 

We have experienced a decline in the numbers of children whose needs 
require placement in educational facilities outside of Medfield. The reasons 
include: Students have moved or graduated; students returned to Medfield; 
and others now attend programs at Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School. 

December 1, 1984 December 1, 1985 

Collaborative 24 21 
Private Day 4 2 

Residential 1 

29 Total 23 Total 

After intensive training for our speech and language clinicians, entry 
and exit criteria for special needs were developed. These criteria became 
School Committee policy last fall. 



136 



Our learning specialists and psychologists have participated in similar 
training with another highly qualified consultant. They will be piloting 
criteria for identification of learning disabilities for the remainder of this 
school year. Comments and ideas from the community are encouraged. 

All resource rooms in our schools are equipped with a computer purchased 
with federal funds. Our teachers are trained in their use and are enjoying 
the availability of this teaching device to supplement and enrich their 
regular programs. 

GUIDANCE 

All counselors continue to see students individually and in small groups 
though the frequency of working in a small group is contingent upon the 
schedule and assignments of the guidance counselor. 

The A.C.E.'s computer remains in operation in the guidance suite at the 
High School. This invaluable service assists high school students in making 
career choices and selecting colleges. We continue to be grateful to Mrs. 
Merck for volunteering her time to assist Junior High/Middle School students 
in accessing this computer information. It is also available for use by any 
Medfield resident. 

The Guidance Department was responsible for hosting an exceptionally 
successful College Night last fall. Almost 200 higher educational institu- 
tions were represented. Hundreds of area high school students and their 
parents visited our high school that evening to gather information to assist 
them in choosing the right college. 

BASIC SKILLS TESTING 



The percentages of youngsters meeting minimum competencies during the 
past year were reported to the State Department of Education as follows: 

Reading Writing Math Listening 

1984-1985 1984-1985 1984-1985 1984-1985 

Grade 3 100% 100% 99% 98% 100% 100% 100% 100% 
Grade 6 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 
Grade 8 100% 99% 98% 99% 100% 100% 100% 100% 

Beginning next fall, the State Department of Education will be responsi- 
ble for testing all youngsters at given grade levels across the Commonwealth. 

HEALTH SERVICES 



Because communicable disease control continues to be the primary 
function of our school nurses, we are pleased to report that chicken pox, 
strep throat, pediculosis, impetigo and conjunctivitis were confined to a 
relatively small number of students last year. 

The 126 kindergarten youngsters entered school with the immunizations 
necessary. 

Impedance screening was provided for all youngsters at the primary level 
who receive special education services and those who participated in the 
pre-school screening as well as those who failed the pure-tone screenings. 
Approximately 25 youngsters were referred to their physician for further 

137 



diagnosis or attention. 

Postural screening results indicated that 806 students in Grades 5-9 
were evaluated by our nurses and physical educators. Twenty-two were referred 
to physicians. Eleven of these youngsters were found to be in need of further 
medical treatment. 

Vision and hearing screenings were successfully conducted again this 
year with the assistance of trained parent volunteers. We are most grateful 
for the continued service and support of parent volunteers, the Lions Club 
and Dr. Stewart Galeucia who assist us annually in conducting our vision and 
hearing screenings. 

PERSONNEL 

Mr. William Meehan, a high school guidance counselor, is currently on 
leave and working within the S.A.D.D. organization. 

Ms. Debra Olshever was married last summer and decided not to return to 
her position as school psychologist. Consequently, Mrs. Irene Kaufman has 
remained on staff. 

Mrs. Cheryl Dolan, learning specialist, and Mrs. Karen Campbell, speech 
and language clinician, are both on maternity leaves. Their respective 
replacements for this year are Mrs. Theresa Esper and Mrs. Carol Amato. 

Ms. Kim McNeill returned to the Middle School resource room from the Tri- 
Valley Collaborative. Consequently, Ms. Jacki Starr left for employment in 
another system. 

I wish to take this opportunity to recognize the efforts, services and 
talents of the para-professional and professional staff who contribute daily 
to the successes of this department. I am appreciative also of the coopera- 
tion and support of the parents, School Committee members, and administrators 
in assisting us in the provision of special services for the young people of 
our educational community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LoiA E. LambeA.t 

Director of Pupil Services 



REPORT OF THE 
TRI-VALLEY COLLABORATIVE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I am submitting my ninth annual report as 
Director of the Tri-Valley Collaborative for the 1985-86 school year. Fifty- 
seven students from our member towns and three from non-member towns are 
currently enrolled in Collaborative programs. 

In these classes, which are for students in primary through senior high 
school levels, there are currently six Medfield students. 

138 



Our primary level developmental ly delayed class is housed at Dale Street 
School. There are eight students in this classroom. Mrs. Barbara Jenkins 
is the teacher and Mrs. Sharon Currie is the assistant. 

Mrs. Claudia Michaels-Brodsky, a Medfield teacher assigned to the 
Collaborative is the teacher in our primary level learning disabilities class. 
This program is housed at Memorial School in Millis. 

An occupational education component has been added to our junior and 
senior high level programs. Mr. Marc Fine, occupational education teacher, 
works with our students in pre-vocation and vocation areas. Curriculum 
development is continuing to include the primary level class. This program is 
in its first year of implementation and will hopefully be expanded in future 
years to include on-site work experiences. 

Another new facet of the Collaborative is the Or ton-Gill ing ham tutorial 
program. Ms. Katherine Gordon instructs students in the remedial phonetic 
skills program. 

An ongoing effort is made to evaluate the needs of our member towns and 
to develop programs which respond to students' needs. 

The success of students in the member town's schools is due to the 
support and cooperation of the building administrators and staff members. At 
Dale Street School we are grateful to Mr. Frank Hoffman, the faculty and 
staff members. 

Mr. Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools is a member of Tri-Valley 
Collaborative Board of Superintendents and Ms. Lois Lambert, Director of 
Pupil Services meets with the Collaborative Special Education Administrators 
Advisory Group. 

The continued cooperation of Mr. Reis and Ms. Lambert and the Medfield 
School Committee assists our efforts to provide quality special needs pro- 
grams. We are grateful to all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

UcJiy F. Tafanoiuh 

Director 

REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD 
ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 16, 1985 was the beginning of the second semester of the 1984-85 
Adult Education Program. A total of sixteen classes in fourteen different 
courses were continued by the Director. The courses were Driver Education, 
Slimnastics, Aerobic Dancing, Painting, Word Processing, Woodworking, Golf, 
Typing, Stained Glass, Gym for Men, Microwave Cooking, Quilting, Computer 
Science and Investments. All courses were offered on Tuesday, Wednesday or 
Thursday evenings between 7:00 and 9:30 p.m. 

The 1985-86 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of twenty- 

139 



seven different courses. Seventeen of these courses were established with 
double offerings in Drivers Education, Aerobics and Painting. Three hundred 
and nine students registered and were enrolled in the program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 

Director 



REPORT OF THE 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my first report as the Medfield Public Schools' 
Director of Athletics for the year ending December 31, 1985. The interscho-- 
lastic programs at the Junior High/Middle School and Senior High School 
continue to provide a positive competitive atmosphere for our athletes while 
at the same time recognizing academic priorities. A balanced combination of 
athletics and academics is invaluable to our students and will help to 
adequately prepare them for a successful adult life. 

At the Junior High/Middle School, inter scholastic teams were fielded in 
football, field hockey, girls and boys ninth grade basketball, ninth grade 
baseball and softball and Junior High/Middle School track and field. Follow- 
ing is the Junior High/Middle School Athletic Coaching Staff : Field Hockey - 
8th & 9th grades, Adele Hardy; Football - 8th grade, Andrew Deegan; Football - 
9th grade, Joseph Farroba; Basketball (girls) - 9th grade, Loretta Fahey; 
Basketball (boys) - 9th grade, Ronald Frost; Baseball - 9th grade, Richard 
Nickerson; Softball - 9th grade, Loretta Fahey; Track and Field - 8th grade, 
Robert Amnion; Track and Field - 9th grade, Timothy O'Toole. 

At the High School, girls interscholastic teams were fielded in cheer- 
leading (fall and winter), cross country, field hockey, soccer, volleyball, 
basketball, softball, tennis and track and field. Boys interscholastic teams 
were fielded in cross country, football, soccer, basketball, ice hockey, 
winter track (co-ed), baseball, tennis and track and field. Following is the 
Senior High School Athletic Coaching Staff : (FALL) Cheerleading - Georgeanne 
Iverson-Kelley; Field Hockey - varsity, Loretta Fahey; Field Hockey - assis- 
tant varsity, Whitney Hagins; Cross Country - William Young; Football - 
varsity, Thomas Rezzuti; Football - assistant varsity, Charles Becker and 
David Gibbs; Football - junior varsity, Jeffrey Denman; Soccer (boys) - 
varsity, Thomas Cowell; Soccer (boys) - assistant varsity, Daniel Dimezza; 
Soccer (girls) - varsity, Patricia Scarsciotti; Soccer (girls) - assistant 
varsity - Susan Kelin; Volleyball - varsity and junior varsity - Jonathan 
Kirby. (WINTER) Basketball (boys) - varsity, Joseph Farroba; Basketball 
(boys) - assistant varsity, Jonathan Kirby; Basketball (girls) - varsity, 
Thomas Cowell; Basketball (girls) - assistant varsity, Susan Kelin; Ice 
Hockey - varsity, James Morgan; Winter Track - varsity, Richard Cardoza; 
Winter Track - assistant varsity, Jeffrey Denman; Cheerleading - Georgeanne 
Iverson-Kelley. (SPRING) Baseball - varsity, Jonathan Kirby; Baseball - 
assistant varsity, Gordon Hodne; Softball - varsity, Suzanne Moulton; 
Softball - assistant varsity, Judith Noble; Tennis (boys) - varsity, Richard 

140 



Connolly; Tennis (girls) - assistant varsity, Judith Coppola; Track and 
Field (boys) - varsity, Jeffrey Denman; Track and Field (girls) - varsity, 
Richard Cardoza; Track and Field - assistant varsity (both), Susan Kelin. 

With the formation of a Tri-Valley Girls Soccer League in 1985, all of 
our inter scholastic teams now participate in the Tri-Valley League which 
consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Medway, Millis and Westwood, The League is highly competitive in 
all sports with representative teams consistently performing well in post 
season tournament play. Medfield placed in the top third of all schools in 
Eastern Massachusetts Division III in competition for the prestigious Dalton 
Award given annually by the Boston Globe. Criteria involved is based upon 
winning percentages of both our boys and girls teams in all sports for the 
school year 1984-85. 

Athletic highlights for 1985 begin with the winter season and our boys 
basketball team. Over the past fifteen years, few high school programs can 
match the tradition of "Big Blue" basketball and this year was no different. 
The team again qualified for the M.I. A. A. Tournament and advanced to the 
sectional semifinals before dropping an exciting game (3 points) to eventual 
state champions, Cohasset. In girls basketball, Colleen Neary finished a 
brilliant career at Medfield High School averaging over 19 points per game 
and over 900 points in three seasons. Our winter track team boasted the top 
two girl sprinters in the league, Karen Gould and Glenna Campbell. 

The spring season is traditionally a time for planting but here in 
Medfield three teams and several individual performers in track and field 
brought home a "harvest." Glenna Campbell in the 220 and the 4x110 relay 
team broke school records. Glenna, Wanda Catenacci (100), Yvonne Korff 
(shot put) and the 4x110 relay team all qualified for the State Meet. Both 
the boys (10-6) and girls (10-7) tennis teams qualified for post season 
tournament play. The girls unfortunately were eliminated in the first round 
by a very strong North Reading team. The boys fared better, beating a good 
Manchester club before dropping their second round match to T.V.L. champion, 
Dover-Sherborn. The softball team finished their "storybook" season by 
winning the Division II South Championship defeating Case 5-4. Our Tri- 
Valley champions became only the second team in the school's athletic history 
to win a sectional state championship. 

The 1985 fall season brought a "new" face to the M.I. A. A. field hockey 
tournament. For the first time in many years our varsity club at 9-5-3 
qualified after being involved in an exciting season-long T.V.L. race. With 
an undefeated junior varsity (15-0-1), 1986 looks to be another great year. 
The football team under second year coach Tom Rezzuti, continues to improve 
and for the second consecutive year brought home a winning record. The 
cross country season was highlighted by Lauren Brown twice lowering the 
school record during a 4-4 fall. The boys soccer team, in qualifiying for 
tournament for the eleventh time in the past thirteen years (13-3-1) , reached 
the sectional semifinals before losing to eventual state champion, Rockland, 
2-1 over two days involving 3 half and 6 overtime periods. Jim Kallio closed 
out his Medfield High School career with 35 shutouts, a record unlikely to 
ever be broken. The girls soccer team made the tournament with a tremendous 
late season surge ending at 9-5-3 and 3rd place in the T.V.L. along with 
bringing the J. Watt Cup to Medfield for the first time. The girls reached 
the quarterfinals before losing to Abington 1-0. The volleyball team missed 
tournament by one game, capping an outstanding season with the naming of 
Page Everbeck as a T.V.L. All-Star. 



141 



Our two sports recognition evenings in March and May were well attended 
and included many outstanding presentations on the part of the coaching 
Staff. The annual Athletic Banquet sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters 
was held in June with Raymond Berry of the New England Patriots as the guest 
speaker. During the banquet, in addition to the M.V.P. awards, Christine 
Harney and Scott Tomsik were chosen as scholar athletes. At the graduation 
exercises Bonnie Patterson and Herb Grace were the recipients of Boosters 
Spirit Awards and Christine Harney received the Robert S. Belmont Team 
Spirit Award in track and field. The Robert Porack Memorial Scholarship in 
boys basketball was awarded to Herb Grace. 

Tri-Valley Ail-Star Selections for 1985 are as follows: Boys Basketball, 
Herb Grace; Girls Basketball, Colleen Neary; Ice Hockey , Edward Doherty, 
Patrick Gallagher; Winter Track, Glenna Campbell, Karen Gould, Christina 
Harney, Bill Loughnane; Baseball, Joe Mariani; Softball, Karen McQuillen, 
Colleen Neary, Nancy Powers, Cindy Shaw; Boys Tennis, Blair Baldwin, Bob 
Geiger, Dan Howell; Girls Tennis, Tammy Fitch; Boys Track, Nick Karafotias; 
Girls Track, Glenna Campbell, Wanda Catenacci; Cross Country, Lauren Brown, 
Bill Loughnane; Field Hockey, Michelle Cargen, Betsy Dugan; Football, Chris 
Griffith; Boys Soccer, Brian Garrison, Rob Hyland, Jim Kallio, John Thompson; 
Girls Soccer, Michelle DeVasto, Karen McQuillen, Cindy Powers; Volleyball, 
Page Everbeck. 

It should be noted that the fall and winter cheerleaders under the 
direction of Georgeanne Iverson-Kelley provided spirited support at our foot- 
ball, soccer, basketball and ice hockey games. They also were actively 
involved in the planning of our rallies and Homecoming. 

It is my pleasure to report that over 57% (291) of our entire student 
body participated in interscholastic athletics during the 1984-85 school 
year. Considering the declining enrollment, this is an impressive and 
pleasing statistic. 

So concludes my first Report of the Athletic Director. I speak as a 
coach when I say "Thank you" to Dave Gibbs for the confidence, support and 
professionalism he has given the entire coaching staff over the past six 
years. I look forward to working with the Medfield administration, coaching 
staff and athletes towards the continuation of positive growth through 
academics and athletics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TkomaA E. Cov02Lt 

Director of Athletics 



142 



REPORT OF THE 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit the Annual Report for the Food 
Service Department for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

For the third consecutive year the Department has remained self- 
supporting, requiring no use of Town appropriated funds to function. With 
the available cash flow, lunch prices were able to remain the same as they 
have been since 1981. The Department also funded labor increases, equipment 
repairs and the purchase of a new cash register for the Junior High School 
Cafeteria. 

Income for the School Lunch Program January 1985-December 1985 : $214,127.72 

Expenses for the School Lunch Program January 1985-December 1985 : 

Food and Supplies = $107,664.17 
Labor = 102,104.18 

$209,768.35 = Total Expenses 

Total Student Participation in the School Lunch Program January 1985- 
December 1985 : 132,156 
Student participation increased from 45% to 49% during the year. 

The increased participation is attributed primarily to the staff in each 
school cafeteria. This group of individuals is experienced, talented, 
innovative, and cooperative and without their input the school lunch program 
could not be as successful as it has become. 

Other participation boosters are the ongoing special theme days and meal 
ticket games. Such events as Deli Day, Holiday specials, Make-Your-Own 
Sandwich Day, Lunch in a Boat, Build-a-Burger Day, Coney Island Day, etc., 
all help attract student interest and increase participation. Many students 
are involved in writing the menus to be used in the cafeterias, touring the 
school kitchens and learning how meals are prepared for a large group of 
2,000 students each day. 

I wish to thank the cafeteria staff for their continued support and 
cooperation throughout the year. I would also like to thank the members of 
the School Committee, Mr. Reis, Mr. Hogan, the secretarial staff, custodial 
staff, and all cafeteria substitute workers for their support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cynthia. L. SaAapoj* 

Food Service Director 



143 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to submit my seventeenth annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1985. 

The following is a compilation of repairs, replacements, additions and 
preventative maintenance projects accomplished during the year. 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL : A new roof was installed over the auditorium, cafeteria, 
kitchen and shop areas. All corridor walls and doors were painted. New 
drapes installed in the gymnasium and new skylights installed in the art 
room section. Cracks and joints in the exterior masonry were repaired. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL: Replaced the circulator to the oil tank. New floor 
tile was installed on a section of the cafeteria floor. Four exit signs 
were replaced. Roof repairs were completed where needed. Exterior masonry 
repairs were completed. 

DALE STREET SCHOOL : New fluorescent lighting installed in the first floor 
corridor. Carpet was installed in the guidance room and music room. New 
window shades were installed where needed. Safety stair treads installed on 
all stairways. Sod was installed on the playground area where needed. 

WHEELOCK SCHOOL : A new door and carpeting was installed in room 105. Corridor 
walls and doors were painted. Motors and shafts in the univents were replaced 
where needed. Exterior masonry repairs were completed. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL : Replaced two classroom exit doors. Resealed the auditorium 
roof. Replaced all the light covers in the auditorium. Installed a new 
computerized heat control panel in the boiler room. 

ALL SCHOOLS : All burners, boilers, smoke pipes, chimneys and fire boxes were 
cleaned and repairs made where necessary. Locker rooms and receiving room 
floors were painted. Scoreboards and time clocks were repaired. Replaced 
glass and repaired damages caused by vandalism. Gym floors, bleachers and 
stages were revarnished. Belts and motors were replaced where necessary. 

In addition to the specifics listed above, the maintenance/custodial 
department was happy to provide assistance to all school athletic functions, 
festivals, shows and for other community groups making use of the building. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. Sincere 
appreciation is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent and the 
Assistant Superintendent for their cooperation and assistance during the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaAold VhJJtOYil 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 

144 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
VrTAL STATISTICS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1985 



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156 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, 
the twenty-fifth day of March, A.D. , 1985 at 6:00 A.M., then and there to act 
on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot viz: 

One Moderator, one member of the School Committee, one member of the 
Park and Recreation Commission, all for one year. 

One Town Clerk, one Assessor, one Selectman, two members of the Board 
of Trustees of the Public Library, one member of the School Committee, 
all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 
Authority for five years each. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-ninth day of April, A.D. , 1985, commencing at 7:30 
P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: Articles 2 through 27 will appear 
under report of Adjourned Annual Town Meeting, April 29, 1985. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this fifth day of March, A.D., Nineteen Hundred 
Eighty-five. 



KanneXk M. CkiZdU>, 
Ann B. Thompson, 
Rob&ut J. La/ikin 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



157 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss 



March 15, 1985 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and 
for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less 
than five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before 
the time of holding the meeting. 

Is/ Gzoxge. W. KingtbuAy 
Constable of Medfield 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Nancy J. Pulton 

TOWN CLERK 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Norfolk, ss. 



April 8, 1985 



I posted the paragraph set out above indicating the place and the time of 
meeting to act on Articles 2 thru 27. 

G<LOKQ<L W. K±ng6buAy, Constable 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION 

March 25, 1985 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with 
the reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, 
speciman ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to the 
voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 



PRECINCTS I 
PRECINCT 1. 



PRECINCT 2 



PRECINCT 3, 



PRECINCT 4. 



2, 3 and 4: Anna Murphy, Warden; Mabelle Maguire, Clerk 

Mary MairEtienne, Checker 
John Ganley, Checker 
Mabelle Maguire 

Beverly Hallowell, Checker 
Nancy Munroe, Checker 
Mary Horgan 
Joan Bussow 

Anna Murphy, Checker 
Lennox Brodeur, Checker 
Edna Hinkley 
Margaret Seeley 

Eleanor Anes, Checker 
Kathryn Buchanan, Checker 
Marion Bosselman 
Barbara Connors 

158 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 710. There was 1 absentee ballot. 

Total Registered Voters numbered 6,373, 11% of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows 

PRECINCT 
1 2 3 4 TOTAL 

MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 

Ralph C. Copeland 100 164 161 179 604 

Blanks 15 29 20 42 106 

Scattered 

SELECTMAN (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

William F. Nourse 89 157 142 167 555 

Blanks 26 35 39 54 154 

Scattered — 1 — — 1 7 - 

TOWN CLERK (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Nancy J. Preston 100 174 162 194 630 

Blanks 15 19 19 27 80 



ASSESSOR (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Donald MacDonald 37 70 90 69 266 

William Walsh 71 118 82 141 412 

Blanks 7 5 9 11 32 

Scattered 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Barbara Tupper 79 150 151 174 554 

Blanks 36 43 30 47 156 

Scattered — — — — 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 

Gay D'Amaro 83 156 144 170 553 

Blanks 32 37 37 51 157 

Scattered 

PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 

Robert W. Miller 78 148 142 166 534 

John Nichols 30 38 38 43 149 

Blanks 7 7 1 12 27 
Scattered 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES (three years) VOTE FOR TWO 

Gretchen Childs 78 163 143 178 562 

Marilyn A. Connors 73 130 114 147 464 

Blanks 79 93 105 117 394 

Scattered 

PLANNING BOARD (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 

John K. Gagliani 91 154 150 174 569 

Blanks 24 39 31 47 141 

Scattered 



159 



710 



710 



710 



710 



710 



1420 



710 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Diane E. Nightingale 
Blanks 
Scattered 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 







PRECINCT 




1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTA] 


89 


154 


153 


177 


573 


26 


39 


28 


44 


137 



710 



Tellers for counting the ballots: Mary MairEtienne, Maybelle Maguire, Joan 
Bussow, Lennox Brodeur, Margaret Seeley, Edna Hinkley, Eleanor Anes, Kathryn 
Buchanan, and Marion Bosselman. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked .voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed 
by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Nancy J. Vh.<Li>ton 
TOWN CLERK 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:42 P.M., on Monday, 
April 29, 1985 at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium, after as- 
certaining that a quorum was present. The meeting was led in the singing of 
the National Anthem by High School student Robin Cox followed by the Salute 
to the Flag. 

A tribute was given to Joseph S. Kennedy, who served 41 years on the Board 
of Assessors, after he declined to run for another term. It was also noted 
that he served as Town Counsel for the Town of Medfield, as well as Moderator 
in his earlier days of serving the Town. He was presented with a plaque from 
the Town Offices and citations from Representative Natsios and the State De- 
partment . 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the Meeting, as well 
as a review of the procedural rules by the Moderator, the following action 
was taken on the articles appearing in the Warrant: 

The meeting was briefly adjourned at 8:05 p.m. for a Revenue Sharing Hearing. 
It was recommended that $125,000 be put in the Insurance 155-00-200 account. 

The meeting was reconvened at 8:07 P.M. 

CONSENT CALENDAR: In order to expedite the town meeting proceedings, a 
Consent Calendar was presented and VOTED UNANIMOUSLY as follows: 

4/29/85 VOTE: Voted unanimously that Articles 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 17, and 
19 be passed as presented in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept Article 2, as presented in 

160 



warrant, under the Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipa- 
tion of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1985, in accord- - 
ance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 



4/29/85 



VOTE: 



Voted unanimously to accept Article 3 under the 
Consent Calendar. 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all means 
in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that office. 



4/29/85 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might 
if elected to that office under the Consent Calendar. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Cemetery Commission 
to appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its members as 
Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in the Personnel Administration Plan, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Cemetery Commission) 

4/29/85 VOTE: Voted to authorize the Cemetery Commission to appoint 
one of its members as Cemetery Foreman and one of its 
members as Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out in 
the Personnel Administration Plan as voted under the 
Consent Calendar. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 



Philip and Mary DeCoster 

John McCormack 

Margaret Cashen 

Neil Driscoll 

Charles and Marjorie Sloan 

John and Alma Bertram 

Donald and Virginia Eilertson 

Edwin and Violet Waters 

Sedgwick Laverty 

James Dumas 

George and Genevieve Carreiro 

Catherine Wollack 

Gilda Runci 

Charles and Dorothy Marshall 

Joseph Watkins, and H.T. Mitchell 

Ruth Dornig 

Robert and Marilyn Stokes 

Geoffrey and Angela Camp 

Ronald W. Rioux 

Minna Davis 

Marjorie Young 

Robert and Carol Ness 

Charles Sutton 

161 



$600 
300 
150 
150 
150 
300 
300 
300 
150 
160 
120 
150 
150 
300 
300 
150 
600 
600 
200 
150 
150 
249 
150 



Richard and Barbara Connors 
Donald Reilly 
Marie Jeon 

TOTAL 



$300 

300 

300 

$6,729 



4/29/85 



VOTE: 



Voted unanimously under the Consent Calendar to accept 
Article 6 as presented in the Warrant. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation 
of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Collector of Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing 
Authority, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



4/29/85 



VOTE 



Voted the following salaries for the elected officials, 



Officer 

Moderator 

Housing Authority 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector 

Treasurer 

Selectman, Chairman 

Selectman, Clerk 

Selectman, 3rd Member 

Assessor, Chairman 

Assessor, Clerk 

Assessor, 3rd Member 

School Committee 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Park & Recreation Commission 



Warrant Committee Recommends 

$ 0. 

0. 

8,309. 

11,000. 

8,309. 

700. 

675. 

675. 

750. 

750. 

750. 

0. 

0. 

0. 

0. 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, effective July 1, 1985, to read as follows: 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



SALARIED POSITIONS 

Police Department 
Police Chief 
Police Sergeant 
Police Officer/ 
Detective 
Police Officer/ 
Prosecutor 
Police Officer 
Dog Officer 



Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


$23,807. 








$31,681, 


20,655. 


$21,486. 






22,528, 


16,718. 


17,532. 


$19,190. 




20,431, 


16,718. 


17,532. 


19,190 




20,431. 


16,218. 


17,032. 


18,690. 




19,931. 


15,583. 








16,983. 



162 



Streets, Water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public 
Works 26,973. 



Fire Department 
Chief 



21,609. 



35,965. 
29,726. 



Executive Department 

Town Administrator 25,976. 

Administrative 

Assistant 16,000. 



47,250. 
23,812, 



Board of 


Health 
















Detached 


Social 
















Worker 


16, 


,693 










21 


,047. 


Library 

Library Director 16 


,800 










25 


,253. 


HOURLY POSITIONS 
















Library 


















Children' 


s Librarian 


6. 


,65 




8.34 






9.15 


HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 
















Grade 


Minimum Wage 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


1 


$3.35 




$4.40 


$4.62 


$4.86 


$5.12 




$5.39 


2 






4.62 


4.86 


5.12 


5.39 




5.67 


3 






4.86 


5.12 


5.39 


5.67 




5.99 


4 






5.12 


5.39 


5.67 


5.99 




6.28 


5 






5.39 


5.67 


5.99 


6.28 




6.62 


6 






5.67 


5.99 


6.28 


6.62 




6.97 


7 






5.99 


6.28 


6.62 


6.97 




7.33 


8 






6.28 


6.62 


6.97 


7.33 




7.71 


9 






6.62 


6.97 


7.33 


7.71 




8.13 


10 






6.97 


7.33 


7.71 


8.13 




8.55 


11 






7.33 


7.71 


8.13 


8.55 




9.02 


12 






7.71 


8.13 


8.55 


9.02 




9.48 


13 






8.13 


8.55 


9.02 


9.48 




9.99 


14 






8.55 


9.02 


9.48 


9.99 




10.50 


15 






9.02 


9.48 


9.99 


10.50 




11.06 


16 






9.48 


9.99 


10.50 


11.06 




11.65 


17 






9.99 


10.50 


11.06 


11.65 




12.25 



Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts may also be 
paid. 



163 



GRADE 1 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 

Part Time /Temporary - (PTT) 

Regular - (R) 

GRADE 10 



Swimming Instructor (PTT) 
Lifeguard Instructor (PTT) 

$1055. minimum per season 
Library Aide (PTT) 
Playground Counselor (PTT) 
Lifeguard (PTT) 

$ 879. minimum per season 
Intern/Trainee (PTT) 
Laborer (PTT) 

GRADE 2 



Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 3 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist (PTT) 
Cemetery Foreman (PTT) 

GRADE 5 

Library Sr. Aide (R) 
Skilled Laborer (PTT) 
Secretary (PTT) 

GRADE 6 



Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator (R) 
Municipal Buildings Custodian (R) 
Senior Accounts Clerk (R) 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator (R) 
Heavy Equipment Operator (R) 
Water Technician (R) 
Groundskeeper (R) 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman (R) 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator- in-Charge (R) 

GRADE 14 



Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control (PTT) 
GRADE 15 

Presently no jobs. 
GRADE 16 



Collector /Bookkeeper /Secretary (R) 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron (PTT) 
Skating Supervisor (PTT) 
Traffic Supervisor (PTT) 

GRADE 8 



Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 17 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman (R) 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator-in-Charge (R) 



Presently no jobs 

GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary (R) 
Truck Driver (PTT) 
Special Police Officer (PTT) 
Permanent Intermittent (PTT) 
Police Dispatcher (R) 
Call Firefighters (PTT) 



164 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
PART TIME /TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 



Deputy Collector 

Ambulance E.M.T. (PTT) 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$859. per year 
$2,450. to $3,197. per year 
$153. to $209. per week 
$1,318. minimum per season 

Fee 

$10 per hour 
$1,260. per year 



$1,302. per year 

$ 438. per year 

$ 331. per year 

$ 331. per year 

$2,770. per year 

$170. to $259. per week 

$187. to $245. per week 

$249. per year 

$601 . per year 

$1,058. per year 

$11,577. to $19,741. per year 

$5.36 to $8.66 per hour 

$3, 107. per year 

$12.38 per inspection 
Annual minimum $2,397. 
Annual minimum $ 320. 
Annual minimum $ 662. 
Annual minimum $ 119. 
Annual minimum $1,957. 
Annual minimum $ 448. 
Annual minimum $ 1 , 089 . 
Annual minimum $ 320. 
$12.38 per inspection 
$6.50 per hour 
$12.38 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan be 
amended as set out in the warrant except that the 
rates for Police Sergeants and Police Officers be as 
follows, under the Police Department. 



165 



SALARIED POSITIONS: 



Minimum 
$17,191 



790 
790 



2nd Step 

$18,397 
18,997 
18,997 



17,541 
21,894 



18,747 



3rd Ste{ 

$19,811 
20,411 
20,411 

20,161 



Maximum 

$21,127 
21,727 
21,727 

21,477 
23,880 



Police Officer 
Police Officer/Detective 
Police Officer/Prosecutor 
Police Officer/Photographer 

Fingerprinter 
Police Sergeant 

and that Article XV Special Pay Provisions , Section G. Police Officers be 
amended by changing the amount for night shift differential from $3.00 to 
$3.50 per shift. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule, by deleting the 
hourly rate position Senior Accounts Clerk, and by adding to Grade 13 the 
position of Finance/Data Processing Supervisor (R) , effective July 1, 1985, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

4/29/85 VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, 

Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule, by de- 
leting the hourly rate position Senior Accounts Clerk, 
and by adding to Grade 13 the position of Finance/Data 
Processing Supervisor (R) , effective July 1, 1985. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Adminis- 
tration Plan, Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule, effective July 
1, 1985, by adding the following new category under hourly pay positions: 

Grade 11 Administrative Assistant - Board of Assessors (R) 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administration Plan, effective 
July 1, 1985, by adding the following new categories under hourly paid 
positions : 

Grade 4 Minibus Driver (R) 

Grade 5 Executive Director, Council on Aging (R) 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the Board 
of Selectmen to establish a division under the direction of the Superinten- 
dent of Public Works for the maintenance of all municipally owned trees, 
shrubs and grounds, including the properties of the School Department, the 
Park and Recreation Department, the Streets, Water and Sewer Department and 
the Conservation Commission and to assume the insect pest control duties, to 

166 



become effective July 1, 1985, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Land Management Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses-of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1985, or such other sums as the 
Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to appropriate and/or transfer from available 
funds the following sums of money requested by the 
Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission 
and Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town 
for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1985: 



100-01 Selectmen 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

100-03 Town Administrator 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

100-04 Data Processing 
200 Operations 

TOTAL 100-01, 03, 04 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



2,050. 
7,513. 
9,563. 



264,672. 

800 . 

265,472. 



14,520. 
289,555. 



101-00 Town Counsel 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

102-00 Treasurer 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

103-00 Tax Collector 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

104-00 Town Clerk 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

105-00 Assessors 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

106-00 Planning Board 

100 Operations 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



17,325, 

1,217 , 
18,542, 



8,309, 

3,215 , 
11,524, 



000, 
,902, 



18,902, 



8,309. 
1,515. 
9,824. 



250. 
175. 



36,425, 



8,000. 



167 



107-01 Park & Recreation Administration 

100 Personnel $ 3 410. 

200 Operations 2 720. 





TOTAL 


6,130. 


107-02 Recreation 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


TOTAL 


23,721. 

7,045. 

30,766. 


107-03 Parks 

200 Operations 

500 Capital Expenditure 


TOTAL 


10,650. 

0. 

10,650. 


TOTAL 107-01, 02, 03 




47,546. 


108-00 Elections & Registration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 


TOTAL 


1,353. 
10,536. 




11,889. 


109-00 Town Hall 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 


TOTAL 


21,668. 

22,842. 

800. 

45,310. 


110-04 Highway 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 


TOTAL 


234,674. 

86,720. 

0. 

321,394. 


110-05 Sidewalks 
200 Operations 
500 Capital Expenditures 


TOTAL 


3,420. 
4,588. 
8,008. 


110-06 Snow & Ice 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 
500 Capital Expenditures 


TOTAL 


43,353. 

60,955. 

5,000. 

109,308. 


110-07 Town Garage 
200 Operations 
500 Capital Expenditure 


TOTAL 


12,950. 

0. 

12,950. 


110-08 Equipment, Repair & Maintenance 
100 Personnel 
200 Operation 


TOTAL 


43,715. 

69,146. 

112,861. 


TOTAL 110-04, 05, 06, 07, 08 




564,521. 


111-01 Police Administration 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 




117,574. 
13,900. 



TOTAL 131,474 



168 



111-02 Police Operations 

100 Personnel $ 404,769. 

200 Operations 18,150. 

500 Equipment 0. 

TOTAL 422,919. 

111-03 Cruiser 

200 Operations 24,700. 

500 Equipment 0. 

TOTAL 24,700. 

111-04 Communications 

200 Operations 8,800. 

111-05 Traffic Markings & Signs 

200 Operations 5,500. 

111-06 School Traffic 

100 Personnel 15,831. 

200 Operations 0. 

TOTAL 16,131. 

TOTAL 111-01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06 587,835. 

112-01 Fire Administration 

100 Personnel 33,010. 

200 Operations 700 . 

TOTAL 33,710. 

112-02 Fire Operations 

100 Personnel 53,550. 

200 Operations 17,115. 

500 Equipment 5,660 . 

TOTAL 76,325. 

TOTAL 112-01, 02 110,035. 

114-02 Tree Care 

100 Personnel 13,650. 

200 Operations 3,650 . 

TOTAL 17,300. 

114-03 Insect & Pest Control 

100 Personnel 1,192. 

200 Operations 680 . 

TOTAL 1,872. 

114-04 Dutch Elm 

100 Personnel 1,265. 

200 Operations 550 . 

TOTAL 1,815. 

TOTAL 114-02, 03, 04 20,987. 

115-00 Inspection Department 

100 Personnel 20,310. 

200 Operations 2,334 . 

TOTAL 22,644. 

119-00 Sealer 

100 Personnel 1,058. 

200 Operations 170 . 

TOTAL 1,228. 

169 



- Dog Officer 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 

121-00 Civil Defense 
200 Operations 
500 Equipment 



122-00 Appeals 
200 Operations 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



$ 18,882. 

2,215 . 

21,097. 



1,670. 

500 . 

2,170. 



1,000, 



123-00 Street Lights 

200 Operations 

125-00 Board of Health 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 



125-01 Outreach 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

126-00 Public Health 

200 Operations 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



47 


,000. 


5 

7 


,814. 
,818. 


13 


,632. 


16 

1 


,693. 
,800. 



18,493. 



5,500. 



128-00 Mental Health 
200 Operations 



9,470. 



129-00 Ambulance 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

500 Equipment 

130-00 Landfill & Transfer Station 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

500 Capital Expenditures 

131-01 Sewer Department 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Credits 

500 Capital Expenditures 

132-01 Veterans' Operations 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Benefits 



132-01 Grave Markers 
200 Operations 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



13,792. 

4,235. 

800. 



18,827. 

52,978. 
184,671. 

q. 

237,649. 

83,295. 
100,580. 
(5,676.) 

0. 

178,199. 



3,108. 

1,520. 

7,000. 

11,628. 



133-00 Memorial Day 
200 Operations 



560. 



350. 



170 



134-00 Council on Aging 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

135-00 Library 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Credits 

500 Repairs 



140-00 Water Department 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 New Services 

500 Equipment & Repairs 

145-00 Cemetery Commission 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

400 Credits 

500 Equipment 

146-00 Conservation Commission 

200 Operations 

400 Capital Expenditures 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



0. 
$ 21,385. 

68,336. 

34,279. 

(14,172.) 

6,500 . 

94,943. 

96,280. 
118,909. 

4,950. 

7,500 . 
227,639. 



18,365. 

7,600. 
(18,000.) 

5,530 . 
13,495. 



TOTAL 



1,703. 
2,297 . 
4,000. 



147-00 Development & Industrial Commission 
200 Operations 

148-00 Historical Commission 
200 Operations 

150-01 Town Debt - Principal 
400 Other Charges 

150-02 Town Debt - Interest 
400 Other Charges 

TOTAL 150-01, 02 



25. 

572. 

405,000. 

181,200. 
586,200. 



155-00 Insurance 

200 Operations 

156-00 Unemployment Compensation Fund 

200 Operations 

160-00 Town Report 

200 Operations 

161-00 County Retirement 

200 Other Charges 

162-00 Stabilization Fund 

200 Operations 

163-00 Reserve Fund 

400 Other Charges 

170-00 Town Meetings 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

17 



TOTAL 



425.358. 

15,000. 

5,000. 

301,214. 

15,000. 

70,000. 

846. 
1,400 . 
2,246. 



171-00 Warrant Committee 
100 Operations 

175-00 Personnel Board 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



TOWN 



TOTAL 
SUB TOTAL 



90. 

1,155. 
150, 



1,305. 
4,175,503, 



SCHOOLS 

180-00 Regional Vocation Technical School 

200 Operations 

8000 Vocational Education 

400 Other Intergovernmental 

1000 School Administration 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

2000 Instruction 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

3000 Other School Services 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

4000 Plant Operations 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

7000 Acquisition of Assets 

200 Operations 

9000 Programs with other Districts 

200 Operations 



130,392. 
0. 



TOTAL 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 7000, 9000 



6,655,235, 



TOTAL SCHOOLS 



6,785,627, 



TOTAL TOWN 



TOTAL ARTICLE 



4,175,503. 
$ 10,961,130. 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the planning, designing, equipping and construction of refuse transfer 
facilities, including acquisition by eminent domain or otherwise, of land 
and easements in connection therewith; to determine whether such appropria- 
tion shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 



(Board of Selectmen) 

4/29/85 VOTE: Voted to appropriate $600,000 in addition to the 

appropriation under Article 22 of the warrant for the 
1984 Annual Town Meeting for the construction of re- 
fuse transfer facilities; and that to meet this ap- 
propriation the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow $600,000 under 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (4A) . 

172 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to ac- 
quire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise all rights, titles and in- 
terest in and to that parcel of land shown as lot 120, map 42 of the Medfield 
Assessors' maps located on North Meadows Road containing approximately 4.57 
acres on the southwesterly side of said road belonging now or formerly to the 
Estate of Robert Palson and to see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate on the fiscal 1986 tax levy or borrow or transfer for that pur- 
pose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



4/29/85 



(Cemetery Commission) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money on 
the fiscal 1986 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for Capital 
Expenditures including the following: 



Department 

Streets, Water & Sewer 



Park & Recreation 

Cemetery 
Police 

Fire 

Town Hall 

Assessors 
School 



Item 

Equipment - Street Sweeper 
One-ton Truck 
One Sidewalk Plow 

Drainage - Rocky Lane & Green Street 

Sewer Plant Maintenance 

Resurfacing subdivisions 

2 Softball/Little League Fields 
Restoration of Metacomet Tennis Courts 
Paving of Hinkley Pond 

Road Resurfacing 

2 Police Cruisers 
Communications System 

Ladder Truck 

Forest Fire Squad Truck 

Telephone System 
Word Processor 

Revaluation Program (1/3 funding) 



2 New Fields 
1 New Field 



Wheelock School 
Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee and/or the Park 
and Recreation Commission be further authorized to contract with and other- 
wise treat with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost 
of any capital expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee respectively be authorized to trade or sell toward part of the 
purchase price, the following: 

Trade 

1 - 1950 Pirsch Aerial Ladder Truck 

1 - 1941 Ford Forest Fire Squad Truck 

2 - 1983 Ford LTD-S Police Cruisers 
1 - 1970 Sidewalk Plow 

1 - 1977 Street Sweeper 



or do or act anything in relation thereto 



(Capital Budget Committee) 



173 



4/29/85 VOTE: Voted that the following sume be raised on the fiscal 

1986 tax levy and appropriated for the following capital 
expenditures : 

Department Item Amount 

Streets, Water & Sewer Street Sweeper $ 75,000. 

1-Ton Truck 18,000. 

Drainage-Rocky Lane 10,000. 

Resurfacing Subdivision 30,000. 

Park & Recreation 2 Softball/Little 

League Fields 6,250. 

Cemetery Road Resurfacing 15,000. 

Police 2 Police Cruisers 20,500. 

Communications System 150,000. 

Fire Ladder Truck 14,000. 

Forest Fire Truck 35,000. 

Town Hall Telephone System 12,500. 

Word Processor 5,000. 

School Department 1 New Field 40,000. 

and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to trade or sell toward part 
of the purchase price, the following: 

1 - 1950 Pirsch Aerial Ladder Truck 

2 - 1983 Ford LTD's Police Cruisers 
1 - 1977 Street Sweeper 

and be further authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with any 
federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any of the above 
capital expenditures. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Jefferson Way from Station 0+25 to 4+62.53 
Gary Drive from Station 15+37.11 to 22+63.21 
Hummingbird Way from Station 0+0 to 3+98.10 
Oriole Road from Station 0+23.75 to 12+50.55 
Blacksmith Drive from Station 0+0 to 8+0 
Blacksmith Drive from Station 8+0 to 11+15.52 
Fieldstone Drive from Station 0+25.00 to 5+41.58 
Larkspur Lane from Station 0+28.57 to end 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in 
the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such right, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

4/29/85 VOTE: Voted to accept as public ways the above named streets 
and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to ac- 
quire by eminent domain or otherwise such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements, as 
may be necessary to accomplish such purpose as printed 

174 



in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote as provided in Section 56 of 
Chapter 98 of the Massachusetts General Laws to set the fees for the Sealer 
of Weights and Measures for sealing the following weighing or measuring 
devices: 

(a) Each scale with a weighing capacity of more than ten thousand pounds, 
fifty dollars. 

(b) Each scale with a weighing capacity of five thousand to ten thousand 
pounds, thirty dollars. 

(c) Each scale with a weighing capacity of one thousand to five thousand 
pounds, twenty dollars. 

(d) Each scale with a weighing capacity of one hundred to one thousand 
pounds, ten dollars. 

(e) Scales and balances with a weighing capacity of more than ten pounds 
and less than one hundred pounds, six dollars. 

(f) Scales and balances with a weighing capacity of ten pounds or less, 
four dollars. 

(g) Each liquid capacity measure, except vehicle tanks, of the capacity of 
more than one gallon and measures on pumps, one dollar. 

(h) Each liquid measuring meter, except water meters, the diameter of the 
inlet pipe of which is one-half inch or less, four dollars; more than one- 
half inch but not more than one inch, eight dollars; for each such type of 
liquid measuring meter, the diameter of the inlet pipe of which is more than 
one-inch the following shall apply; vehicle-tank pump, sixteen dollars; ve- 
hicle-tank gravity, twenty dollars; bulk storage user furnishes certified 
prover, twenty dollars. 

(i) Each taximeter or measuring device used upon vehicles to determine 
the cost of transportation, eight dollars. 

(j) Each machine or other mechanical device used for determining linear 
or area measurement, four dollars. 

(k) Milk bottles or jars, eight dollars per gross. 

(1) Vehicle tanks used in the sale of commodities by liquid measures shall 
be charged for each hundred gallons or fraction thereof, two dollars. An 
additional fee of four dollars per sealed indicator shall be received. 

(m) All weights and other measures, forty cents each. 

The Sealer shall also receive reasonable compensation for the use of 
special facilities, necessary repairs, alterations and adjustments made by 
them, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Warrant Committee) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted as provided in Section 56 of Chapter 98 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws to set the fees for the 
Sealer of Weights and Measures for sealing the follow- 
ing weighing or measuring devices: 

(a) Each scale with a weighing capacity of more than ten thousand pounds, 
one hundred dollars. 

(b) Each scale with a weighing capacity of five thousand to ten thousand 
pounds, forty dollars. 

(c) Each scale with a weighing capacity of one thousand to five thousand 
pounds, forty dollars. 

(d) Each scale with a weighing capacity of one hundred to one thousand 
pounds, twenty dollars. 

(e) Scales and balances with a weighing capacity of more than ten pounds 
and less than one hundred pounds, twelve dollars. 

(f) Scales and balances with a weighing capacity of ten pounds or less, 
eight dollars. ,^r 



(g) Each liquid capacity measure, except vehicle tanks, of the capacity 
of more than one gallon and measures on pumps, one dollar. 

(h) Each liquid measuring meter, except water meters, the diameter of the 
inlet pipe of which is one-half inch or less, fourteen dollars; for each such 
type of liquid measuring meter, the diameter of the inlet pipe of which is 
more than one-inch, the following shall apply: vehicle-tank pump, thirty- 
six dollars; vehicle-tank gravity, forty dollars; bulk storage user furnishes 
certified prover, forty dollars. 

(i) Each taximeter or measuring device used upon vehicles to determine 
the cost of transportation, sixteen dollars. 

(j) Each machine or other mechanical device used for determining linear or 
area measurement, eight dollars. 

(k) Milk bottles or jars, sixteen dollars per gross. 

(1) Vehicle tanks used in the sale of commodities by liquid measures shall 
be charged for each hundred gallons or fraction thereof, four dollars. An 
additional fee of eight dollars per sealed indicator shall be received. 

(m) All weights and other measures, eighty cents each. 
The Sealer shall also receive reasonable compensation for the use of special 
facilities, necessary repairs, alterations and adjustments made by them. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town bylaws, Article 
II, Section 20 providing for obtaining bids for contracts by substituting 
"Five Thousand ($5,000)" for the words, "Two Thousand ($2,000) dollars", or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to pass this Article, but the Attorney General 
disallowed it. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste Collection 
Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(League of Women Voters of Medfield) 

4/29/85 VOTE: Voted to raise the sum of $2,000 on the fiscal 1986 

tax levy and appropriate for the purpose of conduct- 
ing a hazardous household waste collection day and 
that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into any 
contracts for that purpose. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaws by add- 
ing a SECTION 12.1.2 to SECTION 12. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING EARTH 
REMOVAL USES as follows: 

12.1.2 If any earth shall be removed without obtaining a special 

permit or otherwise in violation of this Section, the Selectmen 
may order the restoration of the property involved in accord- 
ance with the provisions of this section. Such an order of 
restoration will not constitute a waiver of any other fines or 
penalties for such violations, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted that the Zoning Bylaw be amended as set out 
in the Warrant. 

176 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding 
to SECTION 2 DEFINITIONS a paragraph 2.1.86 as follows: 

2.1.86 Zoning Administrator - a person designated by the Board of 
Appeals pursuant to section thirteen of the Zoning Act to 
assume certain duties of the Board, 

and by substituting the Zoning Administrator for the Board of Appeals as the 
Special Permit Granting Authority in all applicable sections of the bylaw, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw of the 
Town of Medfield by adding the following new sections: 

1. USE R-E R-T R-S R-U B B-I I-E 

Section 5.4.1.2a - Family Apartment SP SP SP YES SP NO NO 
(See Section 2. 1.15. a and Section 14.10.8) 

2. Section 2.1.15a - Family Apartment - A dwelling unit located within a 

single-family residential dwelling containing not more 
than two dwelling units, in which the occupant or oc- 
cupants are related as parents, grandparents, children, 
brothers, sisters, or who bear such other relationships 
as the Board determines to be in keeping with the in- 
tent and purposes of Section 14.10.8, to one or more 
occupant of the other dwelling unit within the struc- 
ture. 

3. Section 14.10.8 - This Section has been included in the Bylaw in order to 

permit Family Apartments in residential districts, and 
in the business district, to provide housing for family 
members within the home of another member of their 
family when situations such as the age, physical con- 
dition or financial circumstances of a member of the 
family of a person occupying what would otherwise be a 
single-family dwelling make it necessary or desirable 
for the establishment of separate living quarters with- 
in that dwelling for said family member. The Board of 
Appeals may grant a special permit for a Family Apart- 
ment as defined in Section 2. 1.15. a of this Bylaw if 
it finds that the use is aesthetically consistent with 
other structures in the neighborhood and that said use 
is consistent with the purpose of this Section as set 
forth above. 

Said special permit may be issued subject to such con- 
ditions as the Board of Appeals may deem appropriate 
and shall terminate upon the happening of any of the 
following events : 

(a) Sale of the property; 

(b) Death of those persons occupying the Family Apart- 
ment; 

(c) Permanent change of domicile of all of the persons 

177 



occupying the Family Apartment from said Family Apart- 
ment to some other location either within or without 
the Town of Medfield. 

85 VOTE: Voted that the Zoning Bylaw be amended as set out in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town vfill vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw of the 

of Medfield by changing paragraph 14.9 to read "three" associate 
members be appointed instead of "two" to the Board of Appeals, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted that the Zoning Bylaw be amended as set out in 
the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw of the 
Town of Medfield by changing paragraph 13.1.3 to read, "A Sign Advisory 
Board shall be appointed by the Planning Board and shall be composed of one 
local business person and two residents at large.", or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning Map 
of the Town of Medfield by changing from Business Industrial district to 
Residential Urban district the following parcel of land on the northeasterly 
side of West Mill Street and the northwesterly side of West Street, the 
parcel of land described as follows: 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon situated at the corner 
of West Street and West Mill Street in Medfield, Norfolk County, Mass- 
achusetts being designated and shown as 91,185 S.F. or 2,093 Acres on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land in Medfield, Mass." dated January 9, 1985 by Norwood 
Engineering Co., Inc. and bounded and described according to said plan as 
follows: 

SOUTHEASTERLY by West Street, by two lines measuring 49.46 feet 
and 296.25 feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by West Mill Street, 73 feet; 

WESTERLY by land marked "Peter A. Fickeisen" on said plan, 
202.98 feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY in part by land marked "Peter A. Fickeisen" and in part 
by in part by (sic) land marked "Joseph A. DiMatteo" on 
said plan, by two lines measuring 100 feet and 235.97 
feet; and 

NORTHEASTERLY by land marked "Richard J. and Elaine Kedski" on said 
plan, 338.66 feet. 

(Petition) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Zoning Map be amended as set 
out in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
1986 Tax rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 
178 



4/30/85 VOTE: Voted that the sum of $550,000 be transferred from 
free cash for the reduction of the 1986 tax rate. 

The Meeting adjourned at 9:25 p.m. 




mt>< 



:4_ « 



ELECTION WORKER, BARBARA CONNORS, DURING QUIET TIME AT THE POLLS 



179 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 30, 1985 



Norfolk, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in the County of Norfolk, 
Greetings. 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town, qualified to vote in elections 
and in Town affairs, to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School Gymnasium in 
said Medfield on Tuesday, the thirtieth day of April next, at 7:30 o'clock 
P.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the Board 
of Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court for a special act, 
authorizing the Town to compensate Joseph Erskine for loss of wages due to 
an injury received in the line of duty as Inspector of Wires for the Town 
and to see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
for this purpose if the special act is enacted, or do or act anything in re- 
lation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to authorize and direct the Board of Selectmen 
to petition the Great and General Court for a special 
act, authorizing the Town to compensate Joseph Erskine 

for loss of wages due to an injury received in the line 
of duty as Inspector of Wires for the Town, and that 
the sum of $732.15 be raised on the 1986 tax levy and 
appropriated for that purpose if the special act is en- 
acted, otherwise to return to free cash. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of the 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 60, Section 106 providing for property 
tax not in excess of $25 to be due and payable in a single payment, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Collector of Taxes and Board of 
Assessors) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 60, Section 106 and require that property 
tax not in excess of $25 be due and payable in a 
single payment. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule, by adding to Grade 
13 the position of Planning Administrator (R) , effective July 1, 1985, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

180 



ARTICLE 4. To see whether the Town will appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds an amount of $20,000 to cover the deficit of the current 
FY 85 school budget, or do or act anything in relation thereto, said amount 
to be applied to the 2000 (instructional) account. 

(School Committee) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted that the sum of $20,000 be transferred from free 
cash for the fiscal 1985 school year budget. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws by adding 
as "Article IX - Sewage Connections" the following: 

There shall be no connections to the Town's public sewage 
system which are not gravity fed. No force mains, pumping 
stations or other similar methods of feeding sewage into 
the system will be permitted, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 



4/30/85 



(Petition) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning Map of 
the Town of Medfield by changing from Industrial Intensive district to 
Business Industrial district the following parcel of land in Medfield, 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts, being more particularly described as follows: 

The land with the buildings thereon, situated on North Meadows Road (also 
known as Route 27) in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts being shown 
as Lots C-2 and C-3 on a plan entitled "Plan of Lots in Medfield, Mass- 
achusetts, Prepared for Owens Trust", dated August 31, 1978 as revised and 
recorded with Norfolk Deeds as Plan No. 967 of 1978 in Plan Book 271, said 
Lots being more particularly described according to said plan, as follows: 



Lot C-2 



NORTHWESTERLY 
NORTHEASTERLY 



SOUTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHWESTERLY 



by Lot C-l 250.13 feet; 

by land now or formerly of G.S.F. Realty Trust, 
by three courses measuring 24.98 feet, 193.02 
feet and 3.99 feet respectively; 

by Lot C-3, 149.79 feet; 

by North Meadows Road, 202.00 feet. 



Containing 40,129 square feet of land. 



Lot C-3 NORTHWESTERLY by Lot C-2, 149.79 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of G.S.L. Realty Trust, 
78.11 feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Richard K. Donahue 

and land now or formerly of Edward J. Stefanick 
et ux, 124.80 feet; and 

SOUTHWESTERLY by North Meadows Road, 71.38 feet. 

Containing 10,004 square feet of land. 

(Petition) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

181 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning map of the Town 

: field so as to change the area bounded as follow from the Residential 
Town (RT) Zoning District to the Residential Estate (RE) Zoning District: 

All of the land included within a boundary commencing at the intersection of 
Harding Street and the Dover line, then following Harding Street in a south 
and southeasterly direction to North Street; then following North Street in 
a northerly direction to the intersection of North and Winter Street; then 
following Winter Street in an easterly direction to its intersection with 
Pine Street; then following Pine Street in a northeasterly direction to its 
point of intersection with the RS Zoning boundary approximately 800 feet to 
the north of the intersection of Tamarack Road and Pine Street; then follow- 
ing the zoning boundary between the present RT and RS Zoning Districts south- 
easterly to a point approximately 200 feet to the north of Main Street; then 
southerly along the zoning boundary between the RS and the RT Zoning District 
to a point 200 feet to the north of Foundry Street; then along Fairview Road 
in a southerly direction for approximately 200 feet to the intersection of 
Foundry Street and Fairview Road; then following Foundry Street in a north- 
easterly and easterly direction to the point where it intersects with the 
Walpole line; then following the Walpole line in a northerly direction to its 
intersection with the Dover line; then following the Dover line in a north- 
erly and westerly direction to the point where it intersects with Harding 
Street at the beginning point, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Petition) 

4/30/85 VOTE: Voted to dismiss this Article. 

The meeting was dissolved at 10:45 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant, by posting up attested copies 
thereof at in said Town, fourteen days at least before the time of holding 
said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant, with your doings there- 
on, to the Town Clerk, at the time and place of meeting, as aforesaid. 
Given under our hands this ninth day of April in the year of our Lord One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-Five. 

Ann B. Thompson 
RobznZ J. LaAkin 
WWUum F. NouAie 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Money J. VmzMon 

TOWN CLERK 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Medfield by posting up attested copies of the same at five 
public places fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as within 
directed. 

WWUum H. Mann, Constable of Medfield 
April 12, 1985 

182 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1985 



183 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1985 the Board of Assessors was responsible for the supervision of 
its third revaluation program, which complied with the state law requiring 
all property in the town to reflect full and fair cash value for fiscal year 
•86. 

External inspections were made of all residential properties to ensure 
that they conformed to recorded information. Interior inspections were made 
of older homes to verify the modernization factors in use. All new con- 
struction was measured and listed and all commercial and industrial pro- 
perties were valued by standard and accepted appraisal methods. Taxpayers 
were notified of the new values and hearings were held to identify areas of 
error . 

This project resulted in an increase of $200 million in the total valu- 
ation of the town over the three years since our 1983 revaluation. Converse- 
ly, the tax rate ranged from a high of $21.65 to 14.60 in this three year 
period. This increase was due, in part, to the growth in new construction 
but primarily to the spiraling housing costs in the greater Boston area dur- 
ing 1985. 

The Board of Assessors consists of three members elected to three year 
terms which are staggered, as one member is elected annually. Serving on 
the current Board are William D. Walsh, elected in March 1985; Susan N. 
Thornton, a former assessors' office staff member, elected in 1983 and Chair- 
man Melville J. Mills, a twenty-year veteran assessor, first elected in 1965. 

Serving part time for an annual stipend of $750, the Board customarily 
meets on the first Thursday of each month. All of the current Board members 
work in the real estate field, one as a real estate agent and the others as 
appraisers. Each brings to the Board varied expertise as an assessor. 

As a part time Board, we must rely heavily on our office staff and are 
extremely fortunate to have C.B. Doub and Marjorie Temple as full time 
assistants who handle the daily office operation and are entrusted to act on 
the Board's behalf in our absence, when necessary. They have served re- 
spectively since 1978 and 1980 and the Board can't thank them enough for 
their contribution over the years. 

Since 1977, Stan Bergeron has been retained by the Board as our valua- 
tion consultant. He has inventoried and valued all new construction, land 
divisions and alterations annually, reviewed and advised us on applications 
for abatement and prepared appraisals to represent the Board in the Appellate 
Tax Court. 

Stan has also completed, for the Board, the revaluations of all real 
property as required by the Massachusetts General Laws for fiscal years '81, 
83, and '86, using the program developed with our consultants, Municipal 

184 



Computer Service of Weymouth. Stan's professional attitude and dedication to 
his work in this town has always been beyond that required of his consulting 
function. It is more reflective of a valued town employee, for which we 
thank, him sincerely. 

For many years Vinson Rasta has been our personal property consultant, 
updating new accounts, doing valuation appraisals on the utility companies 
and, during the coming years, will value the new cable TV network for. the 
Board. 

Our assessors' maps have been updated annually since the town was photo- 
graphed from the air in 1972. We regret that Carlson Associates of Millis 
will not be able to continue the service provided so ably for over ten years. 
We deeply appreciate their past service. 

Since the revaluation mandate was passed, property in Medfield has been 
classified into five classes according to use as of each January 1. The 
total value is used for taxing purposes and each class may be taxed at 
different rates, however, since the law passed, all types of property have 
been taxed at one single rate due to the residential character of the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MoZvUld J. MtfZb, Chairman 
Sua an hi. Th.oA.nton 
WWUjam V. WaLih 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



18.' 



COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORT 1984 
1985, 1986 



1984 

Class 

1) Residential 

2) Open Space 

3) Commercial 

4) Industrial 

5) Personal 

Total Real & Personal 

Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand 



Parcel Count 


Valuation 


3082 


$263,389,050.00 


298 


6,232,450.00 


116 


10,833,350.00 


43 


8,850,850.00 


128 


4,867,750.00 


3667 


$294,173,450.00 




6,368,855.19 




76,420.46 




21.65 



1) 


Residential 


2) 


Open Space 


3) 


Commercial 


4) 


Industrial 


5) 


Personal 


Total Real & Personal 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand 


1986 

Class 


1) 


Residential 


-) 


Open Space 


3) 


Commercial 


4) 


Industrial 


5) 


Personal 



3095 

288 

117 

41 

123 

3664 



3138 

242 

114 

43 

135 



$271,590,550.00 

5,617,200.00 

11,376,100.00 

9,392,950.00 

4,920,552.00 

$302,897,352.00 

6,512,293.07 

73,194.07 

21.50 



$436,041,700.00 

6,011,550.00 

18,955,950.00 

14,255,650.00 

5,092,500.00 



Total Real L Personal 

Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand 



3672 



$480,357,350.00 

7,013,217.30 

119,894.31 

14.60 



186 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



REAL ESTATE TAXES RECEIVABLE 



Personal Property 






Real Estate Taxes 




Levy of 






Levy of 




1980 $ 


71.24 




1977 


$ 39.72 


1981 


473.96 




1978 


1,567.13 


1982 1 


,238.47 




1979 


3,165.60 


1983 


722.67 




1980 


4,095.35 


1984 


758.80 




1981 


3,473.14 


1985 1 


,079.28 




1982 

1983 


12,681.72 
29,626.93 


TOTAL BALANCE $4 


,344.42 




1984 

1985 

TOTAL BALANCE 


46,763.00 
147,074.85 

$248,487.44 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 




Water Liens added 


to Taxes 


Levy of 






Levy of 




1979 


$ 


39.72 


1982 


$ 205.48 


1980 


1, 


,267.17 


1983 


152.80 


1981 


1, 


,133.28 


1984 


116.26 


1982 


2, 


,951.02 


1985 


1,681.00 


1983 
1984 


2, 

5. 


,207.26 
,671.81 


TOTAL BALANCE 


$2,155.54 


1985 


49 : 


,215.28 






TOTAL BALANCE 


$62 ; 


,485.54 






Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 




Special Assessments Water Betterments 


Levy of 






Levy of 




1982 


$ 


30.00 


1978 


$ 395.41 


1983 




20,00 


1979 


182.74 


1985 




714.81 


1984 


205.73 


TOTAL BALANCE 


$ 


764.81 


TOTAL BALANCE 


$ 783.88 


Sewer Betterments 










Levy of 










1981 


$ 


33.16 






1982 




39.24 






1983 




65.53 






1984 




46.90 






1985 




342.81 






TOTAL BALANCE 


$ 


527.64 


Water Rates 
Sewer Rates 


$146,810.37 
90,260.14 



Respectfully submitted, Nancy J. ?iQJ>ton 
187 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1985 - Including Investments $32,597,201.58 
Disbursements Fiscal 1985 - Including Investments $30,609,171.03 



Cash in Banks June 30, 1985 



Including Savings/ 
Money Market Accounts 



$ 2,776,782.11 



STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 



General Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

Federal Revenue Sharing Fund 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Investments June 30, 1985 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 



1985 



439,200.87 

238,192.25 

0.00 

107,784.44 



785,177.57 



$ 3,561,959.75 
STATEMENT OF INTEREST EARNED ON SAVINGS /INVESTMENTS 



General Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

Federal Revenue Sharing Fund 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Interest earned Fiscal 1985 

Interest earned but not received Fiscal/1985 

Total Interest earned Fiscal 1985 



178,220.58 

37,967.06 

17,619.69 

7,034.65 



240,841.98 
2,411.84 



243,253.82 



STATEMENT OF FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUND 



Total Cash, Savings and Investment June 30, 1984 
Adjustment-unexpended balances-various Articles 
Transferred to Revenue Sharing Account-1982 Town 

Meeting 

Distribution received Fiscal 1985 

Interest earned Fiscal 1985 

Total Revenue Sharing Fund Fiscal 1985 

Due to General Fund - Article 18, Voted Annual 

Town Meeting April, 1984 
Total Cash, Savings and investments June 30, 1985 



118,280.39 





216.63 


$ 


118,497.02 

117,234.00 

17,619.69 



253,350.71 
125,000.00) 



128,350.71 



The foregoing report is a record of the cash, investments and interest 
earned for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1985. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EdwaAd F. BaAAeJX, In.. 
TOWN TREASURER 

188 



June 30, 1985 

OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt $ 2,350,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Elm Street (Wheelock) School $ 340,000.00 

Sewers - Longmeadow 125,000.00 

Street Sewers & Construction 1,020,000.00 

Mount Nebo Water Tower 600,000.00 2,085,000.00 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Noon Hill Land Acquisition 100,000.00 

Police Station Construction 75,000.00 

Sewers-Charles River Interceptor 90,000.00 265,000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 
Balance June 30, 1985 $771,839.25 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Library: 

Granville F. Dailey Trust $ 75,294.86 
Library Trust Funds 11,653.50 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 168,145.30 
Stabilization Fund 38,342.90 

Conservation Fund 12,971.68 

Retirement Fund 447,436.86 $ 753,845.10 

Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 9,961.49 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 5,538.37 

Tri-Centennial Trust 817.58 16,317.44 

Funds in Custody of School: 

Essay Fund Account 1,676.71 



189 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 







TOWN OF MEDFIELD 










BALANCE 


SHEET 










June 30, 


1985 






GENERAL FUND 






Debit 




Credit 


Cash 






$2,808,291 


.62 




Investments 






439,200, 


.87 




Taxes Receivable: 












Personal Property Taxes 










Levy of 1980 




$ 71.24 








1981 




470.24 








1982 




1,168.20 








1983 




651.51 








1984 




690.27 








1985 




701.16 


3,752, 


.62 




Real Estate Taxes 












Levy of 1977 




39.71 








1978 




1,808.15 








1979 




3,182.05 








1980 




4,219.39 








1981 




2,099.74 








1982 




12,721.51 








1983 




24,809.77 








1984 




46,684.80 








1985 




127,391.01 








1986 




(700.00) 


222,256. 


.13 




Provision for Abatements/Exemptions: 








Levy of 1976 




98.40 








1977 




141.52 








1978 




3,156.01 








1979 




23,031.46 








1980 




7,227.87 








1981 




15,217.09 








1982 




9,138.76 








1983 




19,175.80 








1984 




20,546.85 








1985 




28,478.82 






$126,212.58 


Reserve Uncollected 


Property Taxes 






226,008.74 


Tax Liens Receivable 






48,254, 


,14 




Reserve for Uncollec 


:ted 


Tax Liens 






48,254.14 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 

Levy of 1979 762.58 

1980 1,399.22 

1981 964.16 

1982 2,968.30 

1983 2,118.46 

1984 5,556.74 

1985 48,424.68 



62,194.14 



Reserve for Uncoil. Motor Vehicle Excise 

190 



62,194.14 



June 30, 1985 

General Fund Continued - 2 Debit Credit 



Forest Products Excise Tax 9.60 

Reserve for Products Excise Tax 

Ambulance Charges Receivable 29,815.11 



App. 


Sewer Bett. 1981 


10.20 




1982 


31.53 




1983 


(210.27) 




1984 


272.31 




1985 


312.12 


App. 


Sew. Pd. in Adv. 


2,348.63 


Comm, 


, Int. Sewer 


799.74 


Comm, 


, Int. Sew. Pd. Adv. 


104.67 


Water: 






App. 


Water Bett. 1978 


395.41 




1979 


182.74 




1984 


205.73 




1985 


55.75 


Comm. 


Int. Water 


868,30 



18,094.97 



State Income Tax 


(180 


.00) 


Annuities 


192 


.31 


Deferred Compensation 


200 


.00 


Health Insurance 


24,785, 


.78 


Life Insurance 


7 


.19 



9.60 



Reserve Uncoil. Ambulance Charges 29,815.11 

Special Betterments Receivable: 
Sewer: 

Unapportioned Sewer Bet. $14,426.04 



1,707.93 

Reserve for Uncoil. Special Betterments 19,802.90 

Amts. to be Prov. Pymts . Notes Payable 34,936.02 
State Sewer Grants Receivable 156,068.00 

State Highway Grants Receivable 300,243.00 

State Grants Unbilled 379,523.00 

Payroll Taxes & Whthholding Payable: 



25,005.28 

Due to County - Dog Fines 326.00 

Guarantee Deposits 3,689.96 

Tailings 7,509.80 

Reimb. Anticipation Notes Payable 35,000.00 

Due to Other Funds 678,399.08 



191 



June 30, 1985 

General Fund continued - 3 Debit Credit 



Reserved Fund Balances: 

Treasurer's Tax Title $ 5,543.65 

Collector's Tax Title 5,149.05 

Premium on Loans 2 25.00 

Abatement /Exempt ion Surplus 14,053.05 

Miscellaneous Appropriation Reimb . 234.32 

Over (Under) Assessments (2,193.46) 

Expenditures 1,128,392.61 

Unreserved Fund Balance 1,331,669.60 

TOTAL GENERAL FUND $4,124,824.15 $4,124,824.15 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Police Off Duty Detail Revenue (4,834.04) 

Reserve Uncollected Police Detail (4,834.04) 

Due from General Fund 291,275.82 

Federal Grants: 

Federal Revenue Sharing Entitlements 128,350.71 

Federal Ambulance Grant 1,000.00 

Federal Educational Grants 20,877.67 

State Grants : 

Public Works Highway Funds 81,620.56 

Reimbursement Sewer Chemicals 4,301.00 

Energy Grant 2,872.32 

Census Grant 7,665.00 

Right to Know 1,094.00 

Arts Lottery . 574.50 

Seniors State Grant 1,231.40 

Private Grants and Gifts: 



National Dairy Council 140.00 

Corning Library 32.68 

Library Building Fund Gifts 23.00 

Library Bicentennial Gift 200.00 

Ambulance Gift Fund 155.71 

Corning/Selectmens' Gift Fund 4.00 

Town Meeting Gift Fund 75.00 

Conservation Gift Fund 55.00 

Care of Animals Donation 34 3.00 

Corning/Best Way Fund 569.80 

Outreach Gift Fund 110.00 

Park ^Recreation Gift Fund 4,446.73 

Library Gift Fund 1,658.53 

Miscellaneous Gift Fund 40.00 



192 



June 30, 1985 

Special Revenue Fund Continued 

Revolving Accounts: 
School: 
Lunch 
Athletic 

Intramural Athletics 
Adult Education 
Custodian Detail 

Park & Recreation: 

Self-Supporting Programs 

Tennis 

Swim Pond 



Debit 



Credit 



12,397.25 

2,395.26 

19.59 

3,867.82 

1,684.59 



1,080.40 
1,251.15 
1,500.00 



Police: 

Special Detail 

Cemetery/Sale of Lots 

County Dog Refund 

TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 



$ 286,441.78 



(4,039.10) 
13,399.00 

279.25 

S 286,441.78 



WATER AND SEWER FUND 

Water Receivables : 

Sale of Water 

Water Services 

Water Liens 19 81 

1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 



146,810.37 

3,041.10 

(419.14) 

336.82 

(764.26) 

373.22 

1,661.00 



Reserve for Water Receivables 

Sewer Receivables: 
Sewer Rates 
Septic Waste Charges 
Installer's License Fee 
Sewer Liens 1982 

1983 

1984 

1985 

Reserve for Sewer Receivables 

Due from General Fund 

Water/Sewer Fund Balance 
Reserved for Expenditures 

TOTAL WATER AND SEWER FUND 



151,039.11 



90,260.14 
7,319.20 
100.00 
176.76 
376.60 
(32.82) 
1,180.22 



496,160.95 



$ 746,580.16 



99,380.10 



496,160.95 



$ 746,580.16 



193 



June 30, 1985 



TRUST AND AGENCY FUND Debit Credit 



Due From General Fund $ (109,037.69) 

Trust & Agency Fund Balances: 

Stabilization $ (199,849.36) 

Retirement (3,540.63) 

Special Unemployment Insurance 55,774.58 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 6,057.60 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest 2,898.64 

Library Trusts Interest 3,412.29 

Group Health Insurance 26,163.88 

Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. 16.25 

Luke Memorial 29.06 

TOTAL TRUST AND AGENCY FUND $ <W9.037.69) $ (109,037.69) 

TOTAL ALL FUNDS $5,048,808.40 $5,048,808.40 



Free Cash as of 7/01/84 $ 909,750.00 

Voted at Annual Town Meeting 1985 

to Reduce Tax Rate 550,000.00 

Voted at Special Town Meeting 1985 

from free cash 20,000.00 for schools 

7 32.15 for town 



194 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Ames, Harold & Martha Lot $ 600. 

Colello, James R. Lot 150. 

Procop, Thomas & Mildred Lot 600. 

Norton, Robert T. Lot 150. 

Thayer, Horace M. Lot 150. 

Jackson, Mildred & Arthur Lot 300. 

Hinkley, Daniel Lot 100. 

Wills, Arthur & Doris Lot 800. 

Carroll, Frank & Elleanor Lot 400. 

MacKay, Edward & Rita Lot 100. 

Tedford, Robert B. Lot 150. 

Greenman / Renoni Lot 200. 

McGrath, Allan Lot 150. 

Meager, Winifred Lot 10. 

Brewster, Kenneth & Cecilia Lot 150. 

Dugan, F. Joseph Lot 400. 

Rieger, William & Norma Lot 200. 

Kosc, Michael & Maryann Lot 800. 

Taggart, Victor & Martha 300. 

Belmont, John & Georgia Lot 600. 

O'Brien, James & Margaret Lot 600. 

Conners, Kathleen Lot 300. 

Harding, Donald H. Lot 200. 

Ray, Junior W. Lot 400. 

Cheney, Barbara Lot 400. 

Haney, Cecelia M. Lot 800. 

Blinn, Frederick W. Lot 800. 

Lamb, John & Lois Lot 200. 

Crooker, Mina Lot 200. 

Monaco, Richard Lot 600. 

Tascione, Camillo A. Lot 400 , 

$11,210. 



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198 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN 

MEETING 
1986 



199 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN 
MEETING 1986 



Norfolk, ss . 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said 
County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote 
in the elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial 
School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the thirty-first day of 
March, A.D. 1986 at 6:00 A.M., then and there to act on the 
following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected 
annually by ballot, viz: 



One Moderator, one Library Trustee and one member of the 
Park and Recreation Committee, all for one year. 

One Tax Collector, one Assessor, one Selectman, two members 
of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library, two members 
of the School Committee, two members of the Park and Recrea- 
tion Commission, one member of the Housing Authority, all 
for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board for five years. 

QUESTION OF PUBLIC POLICY - OVERRIDE OF PROPOSITION 2 1/2 



Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to assess an 
additional $325,000. in real estate and personal property 
taxes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1986? 

YES NO 

If 2/3 (two-thirds) of the persons voting on this 
question vote "yes", the Town may assess a total tax 
levy for the fiscal year 1987 of 102-1/2*/. of the 1986 
total levy, plus $325,000. in addition to any other 
increases allowed by law. 



200 



The polls shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-eighth of April , A.D., 1986 commencing at 
7:30 P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos 
Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 



ARTICLE 8: To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of 
the several Town Officers for the past year. 



ARTICLE 3: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning July 1, 1986; in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44 , Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44 , Section 17. 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to 
use all means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might 
if elected to that office. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Ceme- 
tery Commission to appoint one of its members as Cemetery Foreman 
and one of its members as Cemetery Laborer at the salary set out 

in the Personnel Administration Plan, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Cemetery Commission) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following 

named sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the 

Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be necessary for 
said care, viz: 

Ames, Harold & Martha * 600.00 

Colello, James R. 150.00 

Procop, Thomas & Mildred 600.00 

Norton, Robert T. 150.00 

Thayer, Horace M. 150.00 

Jackson, Mildred &< Arthur 300.00 

Hinkley, Daniel 100.00 

Wills, Arthur & Doris 800.00 

Carroll, Frank &. Eleanor 400.00 

MacKay, Edward 8< Rita 100.00 

Tedford, Robert B. 150.00 

Greenman/Renoni 800.00 

McGrath, Allan 150.00 
Meager, Winifred 10.00 

Brewster, Kenneth 8. Cecilia 150.00 

Dugan, F. Joseph 400.00 

Rieger, William & Norma 800.00 
201 



Kosc, Michael &. Maryann 800.00 

Taggart, Victor &■ Martha 300.00 

Belmont, John ?» Georgia 600.00 

O'Brien, James & Margaret 600.00 

Connors, Kathleen 300.00 

Harding, Donald H. 200.00 

Ray, Junior W. 400.00 

Cheney, Barbara 400.00 

Haney, Cecelia M. 800.00 

Blinn, Frederick W. 800.00 

Lamb, John 8, Lois 200.00 

Crooker, Mina 200.00 

Monaco, Richard 600.00 

Tascione, Camillo A. 400.00 



TOTAL $11,210.00 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 26G of Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
providing for adequate systems of automatic sprinklers in 
buildings, other than used for residential purposes, which exceed 
7,500 square feet and which were constructed after July 1, 1983, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town 

bylaws, Article II, Section 20 providing for obtaining bids for 

contracts by substituting "Four Thousand ($4,000.)" for the 

words, "Two Thousand ($2,000.) dollars", or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 



(Board of Selectmen) 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to close the following 

unexpended appropriation balances to the General Fund Unreserved 
Fund Balance: 

North Street, Article 11, ATM 1975 $ 1,452.36 
Orchard St. Bridge Design, Article* 14, 

ATM 1978 7,721.00 

Police Console, Article 9, ATM 1978 630.15 

Regional Refuse, Article 27, ATM 1974 939.92 

Land Acquisition, Article 1, STM 1965 5,374.83 

Philips Street, Article 5, STM 1965 2,348.70 

Standpipe, Article 13, STM 1977 440.82 

Rolling Lane Easement, Article 1, STM 1980 830.00 
Sewer Construction, Article 9, ATM 1976 and 

Article 23, ATM 1977 1,646.33 

Noon Hill, Article 10, ATM 1974 756.25 
Elm Street Land Purchase, Article 25, 

ATM 1979 3,384.86 

Wood End Lane, Article 6, STM 1979 21,029.15 

Fire Truck, Article 46, ATM 1983 5,000.00 



202 



$51 ,554.37 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and 
compensation of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town 
Clerk, Treasurer, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, 
Trustees of the Public Library, Collector of Taxes, Park and 
Recreation Commission, Planning Board and Housing Authority, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1986, to read as follows: 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS 

Minimum End Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Police Department 

Police Chief 25,235 33,582 

Police Sergeant 21,894 22,775 23,880 

Police Officer/ 

Detective 17,790 18,997 20,411 21,727 

Police Officer/ 

Prosecutor 17,790 18,997 20,411 21,727 

Police Officer/ 

Photographer/ 

Fingerprinter 17,541 18,747 20,161 21,477 

Police Officer 17,191 18,397 19,811 21,127 

Dog Officer 16,518 18,002 

Streets, Hater and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public 

Works 28,591 38,123 

Fire Department 

Chief 22,906 33,630 

Executive Department 

Town Administrator 27,535 50,085 

Admin istrative 

Assistant 16,960 25,241 



Board of Health 
Detached Social 

Worker 17,981 22,310 

Library 

Library Director 17,808 26,768 

203 



HOURLY POSITIONS 

Library 

Children's Librariar 

Reference Librarian 

HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 
Grade Minimum Ult 

1 3.55 

2 
3 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
1 1 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



7.04 




8.84 




9.69 


7.04 

IS 




8.84 




9.69 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th St 


ep Maximum 


4.66 


4.89 


5. 15 


5.42 


5.71 


^♦.89 


5. 15 


5.42 


5.71 


6.01 


5. 15 


5.42 


5.71 


6.01 


6.35 


5.42 


5.71 


6.01 


6.35 


6.65 


5.71 


6.01 


6.35 


6.65 


7.01 


6.01 


6.35 


6.65 


7.01 


7.38 


6.35 


6.65 


7.01 


7.38 


7.76 


6.65 


7.01 


7.38 


7.76 


8.17 


7.01 


7.38 


7.76 


8.17 


8.61 


7.38 


7.76 


8.17 


8.61 


9.06 


7.76 


8.17 


8.61 


9.06 


9.56 


8.17 


8.61 


9.06 


9.56 


10.04 


8.61 


9.06 


9.56 


10.04 


10.58 


9.06 


9.56 


10.04 


10.58 


11 . 13 


9.56 


10.04 


10.58 


11. 13 


11.72 


10.04 


10.58 


11.13 


11 .72 


12.34 


10.58 


11 . 13 


11.72 


12.34 


12.98 



Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
may also be paid. 



204 



GRADE 1 



Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 

$1118 minimum per season 
Library Aide 
Playground Counselor 
Lifeguard 

$932 minimum per season 
In tern /Trainee 
Laborer 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 
GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs 
GRADE 11 



Light Equipment Operator 
Municipal Buildings Custodian 
Administrative Secretary 

GRADE 15 



GRADE 5 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 3 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist 
Cemetery Foreman 

GRADE 5 

Library Sr . Aide 
Skilled Laborer 
Secretary 

GRADE 6 

Co 1 lee tor /Book keeper/ 
Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 8 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 9 



Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Grounds keeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator-in-Charge 
Finance/Data Processing 

Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Tree Warden/ Insect Pest Control 

GRADE 15 

Presently no jobs 



GRADE 16 
Presently no jobs 

GRADE 17 

Street/Water /Sewer Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator-in-Charge 



Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 



205 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 

PART TIME/TEMPORARY 

Animal Inspector $911 per year 

Waterfront Director $2597 to $3389 per year 

Assistant Waterfront Director $162 to $222 per week 

$1,397 minimum per season 

Deputy Collector Fee 

Ambulance E.M.T. $10.60 per hour 

Assistant Dog Officer $1,336 per year 

Fire 

Deputy Chief $1,380 per year 

Captain $ 46*+ per year 

Lieutenant $ 351 per year 

Clerk $ 351 per year 

Youth Coordinator $2,936 per year 

Playground Director $180 to $275 per week 

Police Intern $198 to $260 per week 

Registrar $264 per year 

Registrar, Clerk $637 per year 

Sealer of Weights and Measures $1,121 per year 

Town Counsel $12,272 to $20,925 per yeai 

Tree Climber $5.68 to $9.17 per hour 

Veterans' Agent $3,293 per year 

Inspectors $13.12 per inspection 

Inspector of Buildings Annual Minimum $2,541 

Local Inspector of Buildings Annual Minimum $ 339 

Gas Inspector Annual Minimum $ 702 

Assistant Gas Inspector Annual Minimum $ 126 

Plumbing Inspector Annual Minimum $2,074 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector Annual Minimum $ 475 

Wiring Inspector Annual Minimum $1,154 

Assistant Wiring Inspector Annual Minimum $ 339 

Health Agent $13.12 per inspection 

Street Inspector $6.89 per hour 

Zoning Enforcing Officer $13.12 per inspection 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



206 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classifi- 
cation of Positions and Pay Schedule of the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan, effective July 1, 1986 by adding the following new 
categories under hourly paid positions: 

Grade <->> Minibus Driver 

Grade 5 Executive Director, Council on Aging 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging and Personnel 
Board ) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, Section XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS. H. To 
increase the special detail rate for special and permanent 
intermittent officers from $10. to $1^., or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 1^. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS , Section E. 
Lonqevi ty as follows: 

"Regular full-time employees shall receive an 
annual longevity payment of $125. after 5 years' continuous 
regular full-time employment plus $25. for each additional 
year of service up to a total maximum of $500. payable on 
the 2nd pay day of December." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or 
transfer from available funds sums of money requested by the 
Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission and 
Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 1986, or such other sums as the Town may 
determine as required by General Laws, Chapter ^+1, Section 108, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money on the fiscal 1987 tax levy, and/or transfer from available 
funds for Capital Expenditures including the following: 

Department I tern 

Cemetery Land Acquisition 

Storage Shed Completion 

Civil Defense Building 

Assessors' Department Triennial Recertifica- 

tion/evaluation 
207 



Planning Drainage/Watershed Study 

Park & Recreation Tennis Court Renovation 

Town Hall Gas Tank Replacement 

Town Hall Improvements 

Police Department Police Cruisers 

Computer 
Traffic Lights 

Dog Replace Van 

Library Access Minuteman Database 

Highway Department 1 Ton Truck 

2 - 3/^+ Ton Trucks 

Backhoe 

6-wheel Dump 

Sidewalk Plow 

Rocky Lane Resurfacing 

Stone seal subdivisions 

Drainage Farm &. North Streets. 

Bridge Street water pipe cleaning 

School Department Field Renovat ion/ teachers ' 

lavator ies 
Handicapped lifts 

Selectmen Former St. Edward's Park &. Library 

Parking Spaces 

and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee 
and/or the Park and Recreation Commission be further authorized 
to contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and state 
agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital expendi- 
tures; and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to trade 
toward part of the purchase price, or sell the following: 

Trade : 

1 1980 1 Ton G.M.C. 

1 1981 3/*+ Ton G.M.C. 

1 1978 Backhoe 

1 1981 3/4- Ton G.M.C. 

1 1975 F600 Ford Dump 

1 1962 Bobcat Sidewalk 

Plow 

2 1983 Ford LTD Police 

Cruisers 
1 1980 Ford Dog Van 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 

208 



ARTICLE 17. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on 
the fiscal 1987 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for 
the purpose of obtaining plans and specifications for improve- 
ments to South Street from High Street to the Norfolk town line 
and for the purpose of constructing a 28-foot roadway and side- 
walk within the existing 60-foot layout and to authorize the 
Selectmen to treat with federal, state and other agencies to 
obtain grants and other funds as reimbursement towards the costs, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town 
Bylaws the following new section under Article IV. Police 
Regulat ions : 

"Section 28. Blasting Operations . No blasting operations 
shall be conducted in the Town until all requirements of 
state law and of the Fire Chief have been complied with and 
until a survey of the condition of all property within 500 
feet of all proposed blasting sites has been made by a 
surveyor qualified, in the opinion of the Fire Chief , to 
make such a survey. The condition shall be documented on 
such forms and with such evidence, such as photographs, as 
the Fire Chief finds to be necessary. The owner or owner's 
representative of each property shall be given an opportuni- 
ty to accompany the surveyor and shall be furnished a copy 
of the documentation and evidence. The cost of the survey 
and production of the documentation shall be borne by the 
blasting operator. The survey shall include, but not be 
limited to, a record of all cracks in foundations, walls, 
floors, walks, driveways, patios and similar paved areas, 
the condition of all glass and the function of septic, sewer 
and other underground utilities. Every reasonable effort 
shall be made to locate and/or notify the owner or owner's 
representative for each structure, including inquiring of 
town officials and at neighboring premises, so that the 
surveyor may gain access to the structure and the owner or 
owner's representative shall be given reasonable opportunity 
to accompany the surveyor, including evening hours or 
weekends, if necessary. If such efforts have been made to 
locate the owners without success, the blasting operator or 
surveyor shall leave a notice at the structure in a promi- 
nent place, at least five (5) days before any blasting is 
done, two (2) of which shall be weekend days, that the 
survey is being offered and a telephone number where the 
surveyor can be reached, including on weekends or during the 
evening hours to make the necessary arrangements. No 
blasting shall be done until the Fire Chief has had an 
opportunity to review all surveys and has been given a 
complete report of all instances where access was refused or 
no owner or owner's representative could be located." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 
209 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public 
mjvs the following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Wood End Lane from Station 0+0 to Station 28 + ^*9.33 

Country Way from Station 0+0 to Station 2+^.17 

Trailside Road from Station 13 + 50 to Station 15 + <+2.^1 

Shawnee Road from Station 0+22.50 to Station 9+52.28 

Algonquin Road from Station 5+50.00 to Station 11+75.53 

Donnelly Drive from Station 59+00.38 to Station 

^6+72.32 

Dover Farm Road from Station 0+0 to Station 10+12.25 

Fieldstone Drive from Station 5+^1.58 to Station 

6+08.36 

Plympton Circle from Station + to Station 2+3^.73 

Brastow Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 10+65.50 

Newell Drive from Station + to Station ^+ + 2^.84 

Marsh Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 8+73.93 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
referred to in the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's 
office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, 
including drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish 
such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 20. To see what sums the Town will vote to transfer from 
free cash to departmental budgets to replace extraordinary 
expenses caused by Hurricane Gloria, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Public Works Superintendent) 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to adopt as Article XI 
of the Town bylaws proposed regulations for underground storage 
of hazardous materials, the full text of which is available for 
examination at the Town Hall and the Public Library, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Hazardous Waste Committee) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer to enter into written agreements for a period not to 
exceed one year with banking institutions having their principal 
offices in the Commonwealth, to maintain on deposit in said 
institutions specified amounts of the funds of the Town, in 
return for said institutions providing banking services as 
permitted by General Laws Chapter ^U , Section 53F , or do or act 
-.^ing in relation thereto. 

( Treasurer ) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to acquire a parcel of land adjacent to Causeway 
Street, belonging now or formerly to the Trustees of Reservations 
by gift, purchase, eminent domain or otherwise for the purpose of 
realigning Causeway Street, bounded and described as follows: 



210 



"Beginning at a brass bolt on the westerly line of 
Causeway Street about 400 feet southerly of Dwight Street; 
thence southeasterly, southerly and southwesterly by the 
westerly line of Causeway Street about 5S0 feet to a brass 
bolt; thence N 49 degrees- 1 3 ' -32E , 22.53 feet to a stone 
bound; thence to the left by a 300.00 foot radius curve, 
452.34 feet to the brass bolt at the point of beginning, 
containing 21,000+ or - square feet" 

and to see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
for this purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Street, Water, and Sewer Department) 

ARTICLE 24. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on 

the fiscal 1987 tax levy for the purpose of employing engineering 

services for the Highway Department, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate on the 1987 tax levy to be used in conjunction with 
and in addition to any funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the 
construction, reconstruction and improvement of roads under the 
provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the General Laws, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sum of money for the purpose of constructing a sidewalk on 
Easterly side of Spring Street (Route 27) from Curve Street 
southerly for a distance of approximately five hundred (500) feet 
to the new entrance to St. Edward's church and to install storm 
drainage in connection with said sidewalk, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Pet i tion) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
bylaw by changing Section 3.3.4 to read as follows: 

"When a District boundary line divides a lot that 
is in one ownership of record at the time such line is 
adopted, a use that is permitted on one portion of the lot 
may be extended 30 feet opposite the front lot line into the 
other portion provided the first portion includes the 
required lot width and depth. This allowance does not apply 
to Flood Plain or Watershed Protection Districts described 
in Sections 10 and 11." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

211 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
bylaw by changing Section 8.3.6.f to read as follows: 

"No portion of any entrance or exit driveway shall 
be within 150 feet of the point of intersection of the 
center lines of two or more adjoining and/or intersecting 
s t ree t s . " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
bylaw by substituting the following sections for section 
5.4.2. IS: 

"5.4.2. IS a) Licensed day car~e facility for the 
day care of six or fewer chi ldren. 

YES in residential districts 
SP in B, B-I & I-E districts 

5 . *+ . 2 . 1 2 b) Licensed day care facility for the 
day cars of more than six children. 

SP in all districts." 

and by adding to the Table, Section 8.12, following "School or 
college," the following section: 

"USE Day Care facility for children. 

NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES One space for each full-time 
employee and each full-time position shared by part-time 
employees, plus one space for each 300 square feet of 
classroom space." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

( PI anni ng Board ) 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
b/law by adding to Section 2.1.2^+, at the end of the first 
sentence, the words: 

", which is bounded by front, side and rear lot 
lines as defined in this Bylaw." 

By changing Section 2.1.27, first sentence, to read as follows: 

"The line dividing a lot from a street right of 

Wd / . 



212 



and by adding to the end of Section 2.1.27 the following sen- 
tence : 

"The front lot line must be located so as to be 
able to provide primary access to the lot." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
bylaw by adding to Section 14.10, third sentence, following the 
words, "special permits required by", the following words: 

"Section 7 - Cluster Residential Zoning," 

and by adding in the same sentence, following the words "by the 
provisions of Sections", the number "7," 

and by inserting in Section 7.1.1, following the first sentence, 
a second sentence as fallows: 

"Such permit process shall be governed by the 
provisions of Section 7 of this Bylaw." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
bylaw by adding Section 14.10.5.2 as follows: 

"Upon proper application pursuant to Section 13, 
and after a public hearing following the procedure required 
by Section 14.10.3j the Board of Appeals may grant a Special 
Permit to allow a sign to be erected that would otherwise 
not be permitted, if the Board concludes that a Special 
Permit is warranted by the application and the evidence 
produced at the public hearing and if the Board makes the 
following specific findings of fact: 

"a) The proposed sign will not have an adverse 
effect upon property values in the 
ne ighborhood . 

"b) The proposed sign is architecturally and 

aesthetically consistent with the other signs 
and structures in the area.. 

"c) The proposed sign will not create any hazard 
to public safety or health in the 
neighborhood . 

"d) The proposed sign does not create a nuisance. 

"In no case shall a Special Permit be granted for 
a sign specifically prohibited in any subsection of Section 
13.3. " 



213 



and by changing Section 13.1.3 to read as follows: 

-ign Advisory Board shall be appointed by the 
Planning Board and shall be composed of one Planning Board 
member, one Master Plan Implementation Committee member, two 
business persons and one resident at large." 

or act or do anything in relation thereto. 

( Planni ng Board ) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning 
bylaw by adding to Section 6.2.1, after the words "Except for," 
the following words: 

"multifamily residential developments," 

and by adding to Section 1*+.13.1 the following paragraph: 

"For multifamily site plans, the size, number and 
placement of structures on the site shall be appropriate to 
the site and compatible with its surroundings." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

( Planning Board ) 

ARTICLE 3*+. To see what vote the Town will take on the following 
petition: 

"The By Laws of the Town of Medfield shall be amended by 
adding to Article I (Town Meetings) Section <+ the following 
1 anguage : 

'Votes taken at any Annual or Special Town Meeting of 
the Town of Medfield may be taken by voice, show of 
hands or by standing vote, at the discretion of the 
Moderator. No vote by Australian ballot, secret ballot 
or any other form of written vote shall be permitted 
unless a motion shall have been made requesting such 
Australian ballot, secret ballot or written vote at the 
Town Meeting at which it is proposed that such ballot 
or vote occur, which motion shall specify the article 
or articles for which an Australian Ballot, secret 
ballot or written vote is proposed. It shall be 
sufficient if said motion carries by a simple 
majority. ' " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

I Pet l t ion) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sum of money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous 
Household Waste Collection Day, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto . 

(Pet i t ion) 



214 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official 
Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield by changing from Industrial 
Intensive district to Business Industrial district the following 
parcel of land in Medfield, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, being 
more particularly described as follows: 

The land with the buildings thereon, situated on North Meadows 
Road (also known as Route 27) in Medfield, Norfolk County, 
Massachusetts being shown as Lots C-2 and C-3 on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Lots in Medfield, Massachusetts, Prepared for Owens 
Trust", dated August 31, 1978 as revised and recorded with 
Norfolk Deeds as Plan No. 967 of 1978 in Plan Book 271, said Lots 
being more particularly described according to said plan, as 
f o 1 lows : 

Lot C-2 NORTHWESTERLY by Lot C-l 250.13 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of 
G.S.F. Realty Trust, by 
three courses measuring 
2^.98 feet, 193.02 feet 
and 3.99 feet 
respec t i ve 1 y ; 

SOUTHEASTERLY by Lot C-3, 1^9.79 feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY by North Meadows Road, 
202.00 feet. 

Containing ^0,129 square feet of land. 

Lot C- 3 NORTHWESTERLY by Lot C-2, 1^+9.79 feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY by Land now or formerly of 

G.S.L. Realty Trust, 78.11 

feet ; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land now for formerly 

of Richard K. Donahue and 

land now or formerly of 

Edward J. Stefanick et ux, 

12<4.80 feet; 

and 
SOUTHWESTERLY by North Meadows Road, 

71 .38 feet. 

Containing 10,00^ square feet of land. 

(Petit ion) 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Medfield 
Zoning Map by extending the RU-Res ident ial Urban District to 
include all of lots 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 
l*+4j 14-5 and 1^6 on Assessors Map ^t2 or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury 
for the reduction of the fiscal 1987 Tax rate or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 



215 



Town Officers Elected 



INDEX 

Page 



APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen g 

Assessors lg 

Fire Chief 19 

Board of Health 19 

Planning Board 20 

Moderator 19 

Tax Collector lg 

Town Accountant lg 

Town Clerk lg 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 70 

Ambulance Department 46 

Animal Control 50 

Animal Inspector 51 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 61 

Architectural Barriers Committee 75 

Bicycle Path Committee 62 

Cemetery Commissioners g6 

Civil Defense Department 47 

Conservation Commission 76 

Fire Department 39 

Hazardous Waste Committee 7g 

Health, Board of 79 

Historical Commission 67 

Housing Authority 73 

Inspection Department 96 

Jury List 99 

Library Trustees 63 

Memorial Public Library . 64 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County . 54 

Park and Recreation Commission 87 

Planning Board , 55 

Police Department . 42 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 95 

Selectmen, Board of 22 

Sign Advisory Board 59 

South Street Committee 34 

Streets, Water and Sewer 30 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 53 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School . 102 

Veterans' Services 93 

Reuse of 458 Main Street 35 

Youth Advisory Commission 92 

Medfield Prison Project 90 



Page 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 



Assistant Superintendent for Business Affairs 123 

Adult Education 139 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 125 

Athletic Director 140 

Buildings and Grounds Director 144 

Ralph Wheelock School 134 

Junior High School 131 

Graduation Exercises, High 127 

Pupil Services Department 136 

School Committee 108 

School Lunch Program 143 

Superintendent of Schools 110 

Teachers' Directory 113 

Tri-Valley Collaborative 138 

Dale Street School 132 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 146 

Marriages 150 

Deaths 154 



TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 25, 1985 157 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 29, 1985 . . 160 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting 1986 200 

Special Town Meeting April 30, 1985 180 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report 184 

Contracts for Professional Services 196 

Perpetual Care 195 

Tax Collector 183 

Town Accountant 190 

Treasurer 188 

Water and Sewer 52